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CIP-Ethiopia Vacancy: Driver (2) – (Closing date – 6 April 2015)

Jobs -

The International Potato Center – Ethiopia (CIP) seeks to recruit two Drivers to its Amhara and Oromia regional programs.

The Center: The International Potato Centre (CIP) is an international non-profit agricultural research organization with a global mandate to conduct research on potatoes, sweet potatoes, Andean root and tuber crops, and sustainable management of natural resources. CIP’s vision is to contribute from its areas of expertise to the fulfillment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), in particular those goals that relate to poverty, hunger, child and maternal mortality, and sustainable development. CIP has its headquarters in Lima, Peru with staff and activities in locations across Africa, Asia and Latin America. CIP is a member of the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research, a network of 15 research centers mostly located in the developing world and supported by more than 60 donor members.

Key Responsibilities:

  • Undertakes driving assignments of vehicles as and when assigned by his/her supervisor;
  • Operates, maintains and cleans assigned vehicles with care and reports any damage and/or suspected fault immediately to his/her supervisor;
  • Responsible for safe transport of staff, guests and materials assigned to him/her;
  • Ensures that the vehicle is kept overnight in a secure location and that the vehicle key is handed over to the supervisor, unless explicitly agreed on otherwise by the supervisor;
  • Records and maintains the transport log-book for any vehicles assigned to him/her;
  • Responsible for the vehicles and all tools, equipment and spare parts on the vehicle assigned to him/her;
  • Liaises with his/her supervisor to ensure that routine service and maintenance is undertaken timely;
  • Carries out errands and performs as required.

Education and Experience:

  • Completion of secondary education;
  • At least 5 years of relevant experience and safe driving record.

Training:

  • Training on automotive with good  practical background is advantageous

Skills and Competencies:

  • Valid driving license for land cruisers;
  • For the Oromia position – excellent Oromiffa language skill (oral and written);
  • Good working knowledge of written and spoken English is essential.

Duty Stations:  Amhara Region – will be based at Bahir Dar city;

Oromia Region – will be based Hawassa.

PLEASE NOTE THAT APPLICANTS NEED TO SPECIFY THE REGION THEY ARE APPLYING FOR AND THE APPLICATIONS WHICH DON’T HAVE THIS INFORMATION WILL BE DISREGARDED.

Grade: 1B

Minimum Base: Birr 5,596 (Negotiable, depending on experience, skill and salary history of the candidate)

Terms of appointment:  This is a Nationally Recruited Staff (NRS) position, initial appointment is fixed term for one year with the possibility of renewal, contingent upon individual performance and the availability of funding. The ILRI remuneration package for nationally recruited staff in Ethiopia includes very competitive salary and benefits such as life and medical insurance, offshore pension plan, etc. The ILRI campus is set in a secure, attractive campus on the outskirts of Addis Ababa. Dining and sports facilities are located on site.

Applications: Applicants should provide a cover letter and curriculum vitae; names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience to be included in the curriculum vitae. The position and reference number: REF: A/015/15 should be clearly indicated in the subject line of the cover letter. All applications to be submitted online on our recruitment portal: http://ilri.simplicant.com/ on or before 06 April 2015.

To find more about CIP, visit our Website at http://www.cip.cgiar.org

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/       

Suitably qualified women are particularly encouraged to apply.

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CIP-Ethiopia Vacancy: Research Associates (2) – (Closing date: 6 April 2015)

Jobs -

The International Potato Center – Ethiopia (CIP) seeks to recruit two Research Associates to its Tigray and SNNPR regional programs in Ethiopia.

The Center: The International Potato Centre (CIP) is an international non-profit agricultural research organization with a global mandate to conduct research on potatoes, sweet potatoes, Andean root and tuber crops, and sustainable management of natural resources. CIP’s vision is to contribute from its areas of expertise to the fulfillment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), in particular those goals that relate to poverty, hunger, child and maternal mortality, and sustainable development. CIP has its headquarters in Lima, Peru with staff and activities in locations across Africa, Asia and Latin America. CIP is a member of the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research, a network of 15 research centers mostly located in the developing world and supported by more than 60 donor members. 

Key Responsibilities:

  • Liaises with sub-grantees and partners;
  • Ensures the successful and cost-effective implementation of project activities;
  • Organizes and follows up on out-scaling activities which involves procurement and distribution of planting material;
  • Manages project funds in accordance with approved budgets and facilitates payment requests;
  • Contributes to the timely preparation of project Action Plans, Budgets and Progress Reports;
  • Contributes to the development of Concept Notes and Proposals;
  • Provides technical backstopping to partner organizations;
  • Plans and executes field activities, including well designed research, crop cuts, seed multiplication and post-harvest activities;
  • In coordination with partner organizations, plans and organizes field and promotional activities;
  • Contributes to the enhancement of seed and ware value chains of both crops;
  • Facilitates the establishment of technically and economically viable Seed Producer Cooperatives;
  • Identifies training needs, prepares, plans and implements relevant training courses and workshops;
  • Contributes to project M&E activities and report writing;
  • Identifies, documents and shares best practices and innovations;
  • Performs other duties as required.

Skills and Competencies:

  • Team worker with staff management experience;
  • Problem solving skills and strong result-orientation;
  • Proven negotiation and interpersonal skills;
  • Excellent organizational skills;
  • Capacity to work under pressure with minimum supervision;
  • Excellent English (oral and written);
  • Fully computer literate;
  • For the Tigray position – excellent Tigregna language skill (oral and written).

Education:

  • Master of Science degree in Agriculture (Horticulture) or first degree plus a relevant post graduate qualification.

Experience:

  • At least 3 years of work experience in agriculture/agricultural development programs involving GO and NGO stakeholders;
  • Solid work experience with potato and/or sweetpotato agronomy and seed production;
  • Previous work experience with NGOs or the private sectors a strong plus.

 

Duty Stations:  Tigray Region – will be based at Mekele city;

SNNP Region – will be based at Hawassa city;

PLEASE NOTE THAT APPLICANTS NEED TO SPECIFY THE REGION THEY ARE APPLYING FOR AND THE APPLICATIONS WHICH DON’T HAVE THIS INFORMATION WILL BE DISREGARDED.

Grade: 2D

Minimum Base: Birr 19,078 (Negotiable, depending on experience, skill and salary history of the candidate)

Terms of appointment:  This is a Nationally Recruited Staff (NRS) position, initial appointment is fixed term for one year with the possibility of renewal, contingent upon individual performance and the availability of funding. The ILRI remuneration package for nationally recruited staff in Ethiopia includes very competitive salary and benefits such as life and medical insurance, offshore pension plan, etc. The ILRI campus is set in a secure, attractive campus on the outskirts of Addis Ababa. Dining and sports facilities are located on site.

Applications: Applicants should provide a cover letter and curriculum vitae; names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience to be included in the curriculum vitae. The position and reference number: REF: A/014/15 should be clearly indicated in the subject line of the cover letter. All applications to be submitted online on our recruitment portal: http://ilri.simplicant.com/ on or before 06 April 2015.

To find more about CIP, visit our Website at http://www.cip.cgiar.org

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/           

Suitably qualified women are particularly encouraged to apply.

More ILRI jobs

Subscribe by email to ILRI jobs alert


A review of environmental impact assessment frameworks for livestock production systems

CRP 3.7 News -

This study, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, reviews the currently available tools for and approaches to assessing the environmental impacts of livestock production systems.

The demand for food from animal sources is expected to double by 2050, driven by population growth, urbanization and rising incomes. Demand in developing countries will account for the major part of the increase in both production and consumption of animal products.

As a result, competition for land and water is likely to be fierce, with potentially profound outcomes for both the environment and food security. Furthermore, it will be imperative to limit agricultural expansion into vulnerable ecosystems to avoid irreversible changes in the resilience of agroecosystems. Thus, a large part of the demand must be met by the “sustainable intensification” of agriculture.

There are many frameworks and methods for evaluating the environmental sustainability of farm systems. However, few of these initiatives are concerned solely with livestock systems, and these tend to focus on one or two areas rather than address all potential livestock-related environmental impacts.

Hence, to fully capture these impacts, a multidimensional framework is needed to underpin environmental impact assessments of livestock production, and of livestock value chains.

The authors aim to identify the key parameters included in sustainability or impact assessment methods, and whether these parameters differ between different sectors and objectives. The study concludes with recommendations on what features are necessary for developing a successful and comprehensive environmental assessment framework for livestock production.

Download the report


Filed under: Cattle, CRP37, Dairying, East Africa, Environment, ILRI, Livestock, LSE, Research, Systems Analysis, Tanzania, Targeting

Climate adaptation effort cuts hunger in African villages

CRP 7 News -

Feeding the projected 9 billion people in 2050 requires a radical transformation of agriculture. Since 2011, the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) East Africa, together with partners such as International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and the International Potato Centre (CIP), development organizations and local government have been working with smallholder farmers in Africa towards a shift in farming techniques that include improved crop varieties and resilient livestock breeds. Initial results point to a reduction in the number of households eating one or no meals a day. Read more from this Nature news commentary published in the run up to the CSA Global Conference held in March 16 - 18.

An ambitious project to help smallholder farmers to adapt to climate change has significantly reduced hunger at test sites in East Africa. In seven villages in Kenya, for example, the number of households that experience at least two months per year with one or no meals per day fell by roughly 60 percentage points over a period of four years.

The African sites are part of an effort to turn villages on five continents into labs, testing new farming techniques, crop varieties and livestock breeds to improve food security in the face of climate change. Run by the CGIAR, a global partnership focused on agricultural research for food security, the project will present initial results from its 22 'climate-smart villages' at a conference in Montpellier, France, on 16–18 March.

Krystyna Swiderska, a researcher in agricultural and biodiversity at the International Institute for Environment and Development in London, says that climate change is already affecting farmers in developing countries, creating a clear need for better information and resources to help them to cope. “Those areas that are already finding it hard to produce food will be worst affected by climate change. More erratic rainfall and greater incidence of pests and disease is making it harder to grow food,” she says.

One of the longest-running test sites is a set of seven villages in the Nyando district of Kenya. There, the latest data show that the number of households eats just one or even no meals per day is falling. When 139 households in the area were surveyed in 2010-2011, 81% experienced up to two such 'hunger months' per year; that has since dropped to just 23%. And 3% of the households now have food year-round, compared to 1% in 2010-2011.

“The amount of food farmers are able to produce and consume is growing. The extra crops are filling that food deficit,” says James Kinyangi, who leads the CCAFS project in East Africa.

Farmers in the 22 test sites pick from a portfolio of approaches to help them to adapt to their individual environmental challenges, such as improved seeds or better access to fertilizer. The farmers also participate in research studies, such as testing whether growing legumes such as the pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) in addition to staple crops such as maize (corn) can improve food security.

When the project began in Nyando, just 32% of households grew 'improved' crop varieties, and just a handful of farmers used inorganic fertilizer. Then CCAFS helped to make fertilizer and drought- and pest-resistant seeds accessible to the farmers through a nearby shop. By 2013, the average annual use of fertilizer had risen to 16 metric tonnes. And by 2014, around 92% of the 340 households surveyed were growing improved seed varieties.

Read the full story on Nature News Website.

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