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Save the date: Integrated Nutrition Conference 2016

CRP 4 program news -

November 14-16, 2016 | Nairobi, Kenya

Integrated Nutrition Conference 2016 (INC2016)

Save the date for the Integrated Nutrition Conference 2016 (INC2016) - Responding with the Private Sector for Greater Nutrition Impact: Innovate, Integrate, Motivate, hosted by Catholic Relief Services (CRS). Join global leaders in nutrition, water and sanitation, health and early childhood development, agriculture, gender, and education from academia, other NGOs, the private sector, and donor community in sharing experiences about responding with the private sector for greater nutrition impact.  The goal of the conference is to share tools, technologies, business models, and multi-sectoral strategies that improve the nutritional health of vulnerable populations.

Learn more and apply today. The Call for Abstracts has been extended to June 30th 2016. For more information visit the conference webpage.

New PIM brochure: what we do in four pages

CRP 2: program news -

The CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM) leads action-oriented research for a food-secure present and future. Our research provides support for policies that help poor farmers, both men and women, improve their lives; produce nutritious and affordable foods; and protect the soil, water, and biodiversity in rural landscapes. 

Sound policies, robust institutions, and well-functioning markets complement new discoveries of agricultural science to create dynamic and resilient food systems. The combination of strong agricultural science and good policy is especially important in poor rural areas, where many people depend on farming for their livelihoods. Agricultural growth creates new jobs both on and off farms as rural economies diversify. Consumers benefit from more affordable food. Landscapes recover as farmers, fishers, herders, and forest dwellers adopt better management regimes and develop new institutions for collaborative governance.

Our research results and capacity development efforts contribute to poverty reduction, better nutrition and health, and good stewardship of natural resources. These are the three system-level outcomes sought by CGIAR, a global research partnership for a food secure future.

PIM is led by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), and brings together the 15 CGIAR Centers and many international, regional, and national partners.

PIM is a global program, with special emphasis on Africa south of the Sahara, Bangladesh, India, and selected countries in East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.

To learn more about the program, download the brochure (pdf, 140kb) >> or view it on SlideShare:

Policies, Institutions, and Markets CGIAR Research Program from IFPRI-PIM

2016 Great Run—Notice to CGIAR staff

Latest ILRI announcements -

The first 60 CGIAR staff members who would like to take part in the 2016 Ethiopian great run will be sponsored by ILRI. CGIAR Staff who would like to take part should sign-up at the Zebu club before Tuesday June 22nd, 2016 at the latest. Others who did not get a chance to be in the first 60 may sign-up and pay 150 birr registration fee at signing and the club will assist to collect the race T-shirt

Please note that staff are not allowed to book on behalf of other staff.

Thank you

Berhanu Abebe | Sports Supervisor | Coach

Kenyan cattle found to have much smaller faecal carbon footprints than those used in climate change inventories

East Africa News -

CCAFS_Mazingira_Collage3

A visitor (left) tours an ILRI Mazingira Centre lab (left),
Mazingira scientist David Pelster (right)
(photo credit: CCAFS/Vivian Atakos).

Greenhouse gases emitted
by Kenyan cattle excreta
are found to be much lower
than estimates derived from
models in industrialized countries. African cattle nitrous oxide (N2O) faecal emissions are 10–20 times lower—
and their faecal methane (CH4) emissions two times lower—
than IPCC estimates now being used to determine
the carbon footprints of African livestock agriculture.
§ § § ‘The diets used in this study were consistent with those used
in smallholder farms in the region and similar in digestible energy
to the low-quality fodder category used
by the IPCC to estimate livestock emissions,
suggesting that emission factors used for
GHG inventories in this region may need to be revised.’
—From the conclusions to the paper
More studies—performed under different climatic seasons,
linked with measurements of enteric fermentation
and with measurements performed over extended periods—
will be needed to confirm these results. § § §

The following is excerpted from ILRI’s Livestock Systems and Environment blog site:
‘For a long time, African countries have relied on default emission factors provided by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), to develop strategies on reductions of greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions. This is because there are very limited GHG measurements from cropping and livestock systems in most developing countries. However, there has been a growing concern on the applicability (or lack thereof) of data from IPCC to sub-Saharan African agricultural systems, and the subsequent development of mitigation interventions that may not be tailored to these systems. . . .

‘Part of the research at the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) focuses on understanding and managing the environmental footprint of livestock. At ILRI’s Mazingira Centre, this research aims to provide accurate context-specific information on the environmental impacts, particularly on nutrient cycles and GHG emissions of current livestock production systems, to enable predictions of intensification in these systems, and opportunities to mitigate GHG emissions. . . .’

In an important first for Kenya,
research from ILRI’s Mazingira Centre
has generated greenhouse gas data
measured and analyzed for Kenya, in Kenya.

The Mazingira Centre is a state-of-the-art environmental research and education centre established at the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI). The goal of the Mazingira Centre (mazingira is the Kiswahili word for ‘environment’) is to enhance the infrastructure and capacity for environmental research in East Africa with a focus on livestock systems and land use change. It has capacity to measure and analyze environmental parameters brought about by agricultural and livestock production. Established in 2014 and now fully operational, the centre promises a step change in Africa’s environmental research infrastructure and capacity.

Read the full ILRI article about this new paper on ILRI’s Livestock Systems and Environment blog: Greenhouse gas emissions from livestock waste in East Africa are significantly lower than global estimates: New study reveals, 16 Jun 2016.

Access the ILRI paper here: Methane and nitrous oxide emissions from cattle excreta on an East African grassland, by David Pelster, Betty Gisore, John Goopy, Daniel Korir, James Koske, Mariana Rufino and Klaus Butterbach-Bahl.

For further information about the study and Mazingira Centre, contact Lutz Merbold (L.Merbold[at]cgiar.org) or David Pelster (D.Pelster [at] cgiar.org).

The CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security (CCAFS) and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) project on ‘In situ assessment of GHG emissions from two livestock systems in East Africa’ provided technical and financial support for this ILRI project.


Kenyan cattle found to have much smaller faecal carbon footprints than those used in climate change inventories

Spotlight from ILRI news -

CCAFS_Mazingira_Collage3

A visitor (left) tours an ILRI Mazingira Centre lab (left),
Mazingira scientist David Pelster (right)
(photo credit: CCAFS/Vivian Atakos).

Greenhouse gases emitted
by Kenyan cattle excreta
are found to be much lower
than estimates derived from
models in industrialized countries. African cattle nitrous oxide (N2O) faecal emissions are 10–20 times lower—
and their faecal methane (CH4) emissions two times lower—
than IPCC estimates now being used to determine
the carbon footprints of African livestock agriculture.
§ § § ‘The diets used in this study were consistent with those used
in smallholder farms in the region and similar in digestible energy
to the low-quality fodder category used
by the IPCC to estimate livestock emissions,
suggesting that emission factors used for
GHG inventories in this region may need to be revised.’
—From the conclusions to the paper
More studies—performed under different climatic seasons,
linked with measurements of enteric fermentation
and with measurements performed over extended periods—
will be needed to confirm these results. § § §

The following is excerpted from ILRI’s Livestock Systems and Environment blog site:
‘For a long time, African countries have relied on default emission factors provided by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), to develop strategies on reductions of greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions. This is because there are very limited GHG measurements from cropping and livestock systems in most developing countries. However, there has been a growing concern on the applicability (or lack thereof) of data from IPCC to sub-Saharan African agricultural systems, and the subsequent development of mitigation interventions that may not be tailored to these systems. . . .

‘Part of the research at the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) focuses on understanding and managing the environmental footprint of livestock. At ILRI’s Mazingira Centre, this research aims to provide accurate context-specific information on the environmental impacts, particularly on nutrient cycles and GHG emissions of current livestock production systems, to enable predictions of intensification in these systems, and opportunities to mitigate GHG emissions. . . .’

In an important first for Kenya,
research from ILRI’s Mazingira Centre
has generated greenhouse gas data
measured and analyzed for Kenya, in Kenya.

The Mazingira Centre is a state-of-the-art environmental research and education centre established at the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI). The goal of the Mazingira Centre (mazingira is the Kiswahili word for ‘environment’) is to enhance the infrastructure and capacity for environmental research in East Africa with a focus on livestock systems and land use change. It has capacity to measure and analyze environmental parameters brought about by agricultural and livestock production. Established in 2014 and now fully operational, the centre promises a step change in Africa’s environmental research infrastructure and capacity.

Read the full ILRI article about this new paper on ILRI’s Livestock Systems and Environment blog: Greenhouse gas emissions from livestock waste in East Africa are significantly lower than global estimates: New study reveals, 16 Jun 2016.

Access the ILRI paper here: Methane and nitrous oxide emissions from cattle excreta on an East African grassland, by David Pelster, Betty Gisore, John Goopy, Daniel Korir, James Koske, Mariana Rufino and Klaus Butterbach-Bahl.

For further information about the study and Mazingira Centre, contact Lutz Merbold (L.Merbold[at]cgiar.org) or David Pelster (D.Pelster [at] cgiar.org).

The CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security (CCAFS) and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) project on ‘In situ assessment of GHG emissions from two livestock systems in East Africa’ provided technical and financial support for this ILRI project.


Kenyan cattle found to have much smaller faecal carbon footprints than those used in climate change inventories

News from ILRI -

CCAFS_Mazingira_Collage3

A visitor (left) tours an ILRI Mazingira Centre lab (left),
Mazingira scientist David Pelster (right)
(photo credit: CCAFS/Vivian Atakos).

Greenhouse gases emitted
by Kenyan cattle excreta
are found to be much lower
than estimates derived from
models in industrialized countries. African cattle nitrous oxide (N2O) faecal emissions are 10–20 times lower—
and their faecal methane (CH4) emissions two times lower—
than IPCC estimates now being used to determine
the carbon footprints of African livestock agriculture.
§ § § ‘The diets used in this study were consistent with those used
in smallholder farms in the region and similar in digestible energy
to the low-quality fodder category used
by the IPCC to estimate livestock emissions,
suggesting that emission factors used for
GHG inventories in this region may need to be revised.’
—From the conclusions to the paper
More studies—performed under different climatic seasons,
linked with measurements of enteric fermentation
and with measurements performed over extended periods—
will be needed to confirm these results. § § §

The following is excerpted from ILRI’s Livestock Systems and Environment blog site:
‘For a long time, African countries have relied on default emission factors provided by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), to develop strategies on reductions of greenhouse gas (GHGs) emissions. This is because there are very limited GHG measurements from cropping and livestock systems in most developing countries. However, there has been a growing concern on the applicability (or lack thereof) of data from IPCC to sub-Saharan African agricultural systems, and the subsequent development of mitigation interventions that may not be tailored to these systems. . . .

‘Part of the research at the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) focuses on understanding and managing the environmental footprint of livestock. At ILRI’s Mazingira Centre, this research aims to provide accurate context-specific information on the environmental impacts, particularly on nutrient cycles and GHG emissions of current livestock production systems, to enable predictions of intensification in these systems, and opportunities to mitigate GHG emissions. . . .’

In an important first for Kenya,
research from ILRI’s Mazingira Centre
has generated greenhouse gas data
measured and analyzed for Kenya, in Kenya.

The Mazingira Centre is a state-of-the-art environmental research and education centre established at the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI). The goal of the Mazingira Centre (mazingira is the Kiswahili word for ‘environment’) is to enhance the infrastructure and capacity for environmental research in East Africa with a focus on livestock systems and land use change. It has capacity to measure and analyze environmental parameters brought about by agricultural and livestock production. Established in 2014 and now fully operational, the centre promises a step change in Africa’s environmental research infrastructure and capacity.

Read the full ILRI article about this new paper on ILRI’s Livestock Systems and Environment blog: Greenhouse gas emissions from livestock waste in East Africa are significantly lower than global estimates: New study reveals, 16 Jun 2016.

Access the ILRI paper here: Methane and nitrous oxide emissions from cattle excreta on an East African grassland, by David Pelster, Betty Gisore, John Goopy, Daniel Korir, James Koske, Mariana Rufino and Klaus Butterbach-Bahl.

For further information about the study and Mazingira Centre, contact Lutz Merbold (L.Merbold[at]cgiar.org) or David Pelster (D.Pelster [at] cgiar.org).

The CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security (CCAFS) and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) project on ‘In situ assessment of GHG emissions from two livestock systems in East Africa’ provided technical and financial support for this ILRI project.


ILRI Vacancy: Administrative Assistant – Capacity Development (Re-advertisement) (closing date 1 July 2016)

Jobs -

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) seeks to recruit an Administrative Assistant to provide administrative support to the Capacity Development Unit and support the administration of the graduate fellowship programme.

ILRI works with partners worldwide to enhance the roles that livestock play in food security and poverty alleviation, principally in Africa and Asia. The outcomes of these research partnerships help people in developing countries keep their farm animals’ alive and productive, increase and sustain their livestock and farm productivity, find profitable markets for their animal products, and reduce the risk of livestock-related diseases www.ilri.org

ILRI is a not-for-profit institution with a staff of about 700 and in 2016, an operating budget of about USD83 million. A member of the CGIAR Consortium working for a food-secure future, ILRI has its headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya, a principal campus in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and offices in other countries in East, West and Southern Africa and in South, Southeast and East Asia www.cgiar.org

Key responsibilities

  1. Provide support to the management of ILRI graduate fellowship program including;
  • Provide administrative support as required during the graduate/research fellows’ recruitment process.
  • Inducting new graduate fellows to ILRI and liaise with relevant units i.e. IT, health and safety Unit, Finance and HR to ensure all the relevant procedures are followed.
  • Providing on-going administrative support to the graduate/research fellows.

Regularly maintain up-to-date records of graduate/research fellows.

2. Provide support for CapDev training activities.

  • Provide logistical support in the organization, coordination and implementation of meetings, trainings (group trainings, special workshops etc.)
  • Assist in the preparation of certificates for participants;
  • Keep records of participants for future communication;
  • Take minutes and compile reports for workshops;
  • Evaluate training activities and use the feedback  to improve the quality of service offered by the CapDev unit.
  1. Maintaining the training databases and other records for Capacity Development Unit
  • Maintaining an up to date electronic trainee’s database;
  • Keeping proper file records of the trainees;
  • Maintaining the Direct Links in the Global Address list;
  • Maintaining a database of University/partners contacts.
  1. Providing day to day administrative support to the CapDev team
  • Liaising with all ILRI administrative Units, Research themes, projects and support units as required to deal with CapDev administrative matters;
  • Assist visitors on general administrative matters, provide advice and ensure administrative support as required;
  • Maintaining and updating a proper filing system for the Unit documents;
  • Receiving, screening, logging, routing and attending to phone calls;
  • Drafting routine correspondence; and
  • Organizing travel arrangements and preparing travel expense reports;

Any other support/administrative tasks as required by supervisor or Head of CapDev

Requirements

  • A Diploma in either business administration, secretarial studies, office management or a related field;
  • A minimum of 2 years’ recent experience in an administrative role;
  • Front office experience and public relations or customer relations skills would be an added advantage;
  • Proficiency in Microsoft Office packages;(Excel use a must)
  • Excellent communication skills; written and verbal communication in English, including web based communications;
  • Excellent interpersonal skills and ability to work within a multicultural environment;
  • Superior multi-tasking skills with the ability to coordinate prioritize and organize tasks to meet deadlines with minimal supervision; and
  • Confident, outgoing personality, highly articulate and able to relate with people at all levels.

Terms of Appointment

This is a Nationally Recruited Staff (NRS) position based at ILRI’s Nairobi campus. It is open to Kenyan nationals only. The position is on a 3-year contract, renewable subject to satisfactory performance and availability of funding.

Job Level

This position is job level 1C, ILRI offers a competitive salary and benefits package which includes; pension, medical and other insurances for ILRI’s Nationally Recruited Staff.

How to apply: Applicants should send a cover letter and CV explaining their interest in the position, what they can bring to the job and the names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience to the Director, People and Organizational Development by clicking on the “Apply Now” tab above on or before 1 July 2016. The position title and reference number REF: AA/ CAPDEV /06/2016 should be clearly marked on the subject line of the cover letter.

We thank all applicants for their interest in working for ILRI. Due to the volume of applications, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

ILRI does not charge a fee at any stage of the recruitment process (application, interview meeting, processing or training). ILRI also does not concern itself with information on applicants’ bank accounts.

To find out more about ILRI, visit our websites at http://www.ilri.org/

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/

ILRI is an equal opportunity employer.

 


Insurance for vehicles

Latest ILRI announcements -

Vehicle insurance coverage for ILRI and hosted institute official vehicles will be expired on July 31, 2016. The insurance proclamation states that all insurance coverage to be provided against advance settlement of the required premium. To do so, we are under process to renew and update our current list of vehicles at ILRI and Hosted Institutions.

This is therefore kindly requesting you to update the vehicle list and charge code under your units/project as per the attached form. Please fill the form carefully and return before 24, June, 2016.

Best Regards,

Kebede Assefa |Supply Cahin |Stores Supervisor

Job Posting

POD announcement -

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) seeks to recruit an Economist – Resilience and Innovation for Dryland Systems to support and lead a range of empirical research projects related to the economics of rural development, livelihood resilience, social protection and graduation, income generation, and access to markets and services. Click on the link below for more details:

ILRI Vacancy: Economist, Resilience and Innovation for Dryland Systems – IBLI (closing date 14 July 2016)

Kindly circulate widely.

Regards,

Emily Kerandi | People & Organizational Development – Learning & Performance

 

 

Job Posting

Latest ILRI announcements -

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) seeks to recruit an Economist – Resilience and Innovation for Dryland Systems to support and lead a range of empirical research projects related to the economics of rural development, livelihood resilience, social protection and graduation, income generation, and access to markets and services. Click on the link below for more details:

ILRI Vacancy: Economist, Resilience and Innovation for Dryland Systems – IBLI (closing date 14 July 2016)

Kindly circulate widely.

Regards,

Emily Kerandi | People & Organizational Development – Learning & Performance

 

 

Effects of White Spot Disease and biosecurity on shrimp farming in Bangladesh

CRP 3.7 News -

Shrimp culture is of central importance in Bangladesh, shrimp being the cash component of many smallholder, polyculture fish farming systems. Shrimp also contributes substantial income through exports. However, production remains low compared with other countries for a number of reasons, including low availability of good quality post larvae (PL) seed stock, lack of credit facilities, and disease problems.

Ensuring access to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) free PL combined with the implementation of best management practices at farm level will help reduce disease risk and stimulate investment, leading to improved shrimp production and improved farmer livelihoods, as argued in this paper by the WorldFish aquaculture science team in Bangladesh.

Download the open access article

Debnath, P.P., Karim, M., Keus, H.J., Mohan, C.V. and Belton, B. 2016. Effects of white spot disease and bio-security on shrimp farming in Bangladesh. Fish Pathology 51:S60-S65. http://dx.doi.org/10.3147/jsfp.51.s60

 


Filed under: Animal Diseases, Animal Health, Aquaculture, Asia, Bangladesh, CRP37, Research, South Asia, WorldFish

Aerobics classes at Zebu Club

Latest ILRI announcements -

We are delighted to invite all members to participate in the different aerobics classes (step, insanity and circuit) free of charge until July 31, 2016 with the exception of the Yoga and Zumba classes. We would like to extend THREE free pass YOGA class tickets for the first 10 members who will register at the housing.

Please come and enjoy the classes!

Thank you,

 

Admassu Wondimu  |Housing, Catering and Conference Services Manager  |

 

Introducing Leah Symekher

Latest ILRI announcements -

LeahJoyceLeah has over 10 years’ experience in instruction, training & development and research. A Kenyan, Leah started her career as a research assistant at the Constitution of Kenya Review Commission supporting the Commission’s task forces on various research activities in constitution and constitutional themes. She was further engaged in public policy research in education while working at the Institute of Economic Affairs as a project manager on a project: Public Service Delivery in the Education Sector in Kenya. Leah then went into instruction of undergraduate student teachers at Kyambogo University – Kampala, Uganda. She instructed courses on Curriculum Design & Development and Education Technology under the Teacher Development Department, Faculty of Education. Immediately before joining ILRI, Leah worked in the corporate sector as a training manager and head of business support at Equity Bank.

Leah has a Masters of Education with a specialty in Curriculum Studies from the University of Nairobi and a Bachelors in Education (Science) from Egerton University.

Leah’s role will be to manage the ILRI Fellowship program, support day to day management of the Capacity Development Unit, and provide capacity development technical inputs to a range of ILRI projects and CRPs.

Please join me in welcoming Leah to the ILRI family.

Best wishes

Iddo Dror  Head of Capacity Development

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