Feed aggregator

NBDC key message: Consider downstream costs and benefits of land and water management interventions

Nile Basin Development Challenge: Project Outputs -

NBDC key message: Consider downstream costs and benefits of land and water management interventions ILRI; IWMI This digital story was produced to communicate the key messages resulting from the Nile Basin Development Challenge (NBDC). Key message 7 is to attend to downstream and off-site benefits of rainwater management as well as upstream or on-farm benefits and costs.The Nile BDC aimed to improve the livelihoods of farmers in the Ethiopian highlands through land and water management and was funded by the Challenge Program for Water and Food. The eight key messages constitute a 'new integrated watershed rainwater management paradigm' and are based on the outputs and outcomes of trans-disciplinary scientific research for development. For more information see: http://nilebdc.org

NBDC key message: Integrate multiple interventions at watershed and basin scales

Nile Basin Development Challenge: Project Outputs -

NBDC key message: Integrate multiple interventions at watershed and basin scales ILRI; IWMI This digital story was produced to communicate the key messages resulting from the Nile Basin Development Challenge (NBDC). Key message 6 is integrate multiple rainwater management interventions at watershed and basin scales to benefit rainwater management programs. The Nile BDC aimed to improve the livelihoods of farmers in the Ethiopian highlands through land and water management and was funded by the Challenge Program for Water and Food. The eight key messages constitute a 'new integrated watershed rainwater management paradigm' and are based on the outputs and outcomes of trans-disciplinary scientific research for development. For more information see: http://nilebdc.org

NBDC key message: Create, align and implement incentives

Nile Basin Development Challenge: Project Outputs -

NBDC key message: Create, align and implement incentives ILRI; IWMI This digital story was produced to communicate the key messages resulting from the Nile Basin Development Challenge (NBDC). Key message 4 is to create, align and implement incentives for all parties to successfully implement sustainable innovative programs at scale. The Nile BDC aimed to improve the livelihoods of farmers in the Ethiopian highlands through land and water management and was funded by the Challenge Program for Water and Food. The eight key messages constitute a 'new integrated watershed rainwater management paradigm' and are based on the outputs and outcomes of trans-disciplinary scientific research for development. For more information see: http://nilebdc.org

NBDC key message: Strengthen and transform institiutional and human capacities

Nile Basin Development Challenge: Project Outputs -

NBDC key message: Strengthen and transform institiutional and human capacities ILRI; IWMI This digital story was produced to communicate the key messages resulting from the Nile Basin Development Challenge (NBDC). Key message 3 is to strengthen and transform institutional and human capacities among all stakeholders to achieve the potential benefits of sustainable land management. The Nile BDC aimed to improve the livelihoods of farmers in the Ethiopian highlands through land and water management and was funded by the Challenge Program for Water and Food. The eight key messages constitute a 'new integrated watershed rainwater management paradigm' and are based on the outputs and outcomes of trans-disciplinary scientific research for development. For more information see: http://nilebdc.org

NBDC key message: Empower local communities and develop their leadership capacities

Nile Basin Development Challenge: Project Outputs -

NBDC key message: Empower local communities and develop their leadership capacities ILRI; IWMI This digital story was produced to communicate the key messages resulting from the Nile Basin Development Challenge (NBDC). Key message 1 is to empower local communities and develop their leadership capacities to achieve long-term benefits and sustainable outcomes. The Nile BDC aimed to improve the livelihoods of farmers in the Ethiopian highlands through land and water management and was funded by the Challenge Program for Water and Food. The eight key messages constitute a 'new integrated watershed rainwater management paradigm' and are based on the outputs and outcomes of trans-disciplinary scientific research for development. For more information see: http://nilebdc.org

Maize, Pigs, Plums and Tea – Linking Smallholder Farmers to Markets in Northwest Vietnam

CRP1.2Program news -

Vietnam Maize Harvest 2One of the key recommendations emerging from a situational analysis conducted in four provinces of Northwest Vietnam is to use existing success stories of marketing business models to replicate those within value chains for indigenous local foods targeting niche markets.

As a result, Humidtropics scientists from ILRI partnered with the Agriculture Economics and Value Chains Department of the Centre for Agrarian Systems Research and Development (CASRAD) to conduct a value chain assessment on four agricultural products: maize, pigs, plums and tea. This assessment provided crucial insights into functioning business models linking smallholder farmers to dynamic markets, and will help determine future Humidtropics Research for Development (R4D) interventions on policies, institutions and markets. Read the full story here.

The post Maize, Pigs, Plums and Tea – Linking Smallholder Farmers to Markets in Northwest Vietnam appeared first on Humidtropics.

ILRI Vacancy: Program Leader – Policy Trade and Value Chains (open until filled)

Jobs -

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) seeks to recruit a Senior Economist and Program Leader within its Integrated Sciences Division to lead ILRI’s evolving and expanding portfolio of research in Policy, Trade and Value Chains. The program leader will lead team members with expertise in devising tailored tools and methods for policy monitoring, policy evaluation, and value chains analysis. The research objective of the Policy, Trade and Value chains program is to understand how public policies on one hand and institutions and organizations created by market stakeholders on the other hand, impact on the performance of domestic and international agrifood value chains, with a strong focus on livestock products.

ILRI works to enhance the roles livestock play in pathways out of poverty in developing countries. ILRI is a member of the CGIAR Consortium, a global research partnership of 15 centres working with many partners for a food-secure future. ILRI has two main campuses in East Africa and other hubs in East, West and Southern Africa and South, Southeast and East Asia. www.ilri.org.

CGIAR is a global agricultural research partnership for a food-secure future. Its science is carried out by 15 research centres that are members of the CGIAR Consortium in collaboration with hundreds of partner organizations. www.cgiar.org.

Responsibilities:

  • Lead and manage a geographically-dispersed international team of economists, social scientists, and modelers addressing a range of research on livestock policy, trade and value chain development in developing countries;
  • Lead the conceptual development of analytical frameworks, methods and tools for the study of livestock product markets, value chains, trade regimes, and regulatory and investment policy environments relevant to livestock development. Such work includes action-oriented piloting of value chain interventions and strategies;
  • Build collaborations with relevant institutions and organizations internationally and nationally to conduct and deliver World class research;
  • Coordinate the Policy, Trade and Value Chains program with ILRI’s participation in the CGIAR Research Programs (CRPs);
  • Policy research and evidence-based advocacy;
  • Participate in ILRI management, particularly in achieving co-ordination with other programs and in provision of economics and other social science support to multi-disciplinary initiatives;
  • Support development projects led by NGOs and other development partners to ensure use of best practice value chain interventions, and to generate objective evidence from piloting those interventions;
  • Conduct and support the communication and promotion of research products and processes;
  • Develop proposals to raise resources to support new research addressing the policy, trade and value chain program agenda.

Requirements:

  • A passion for the generation of scientific knowledge that advances pro-poor development;
  • A PhD in Agricultural Economics, Economics, Agribusiness or other Social Science with application to agriculture or rural development, with a minimum of 8 years of experience post-PhD;
  • A proven research record reflecting experience in research design, quantitative and qualitative analytic methods and producing peer-reviewed outputs;
  • Experience in managing a multi-disciplinary and multi-national team of researchers and development practitioners, and in the associated human resource and financial management;
  • Demonstrated strong experience with analysis of smallholder value chain performance, sector and trade modeling, returns on investment, consumer demand, and access to markets and services;
  • Understanding of outcome-oriented research design and implementation with pro-poor and gender orientation, including communication and advocacy strategy development;
  • Strong econometric and/or mathematical modeling skills, and the ability to apply them in pro-poor development research;
  • Demonstrated ability to deliver multi-disciplinary research outputs and to initiate and manage cross-disciplinary research activities;
  • Familiarity with aspects of livestock production and marketing, crop-livestock systems, and rural market institutions and services in developing countries;
  • Strong English language skills, both written and spoken (proficiency in other languages is an advantage);
  • Willingness and ability to travel frequently, sometimes to rural areas in developing countries.

Post location: The position is based at ILRI’s Headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya. Extensive travel to other countries and regions will be required.

Position level:The position is Scientist/Research Level 3 dependent on qualifications and experience.

Duration:3 years with the possibility of renewal, contingent upon individual performance and continued funding.

Benefits: ILRI offers a competitive international salary and benefits package which includes 15% Pension, Medical insurance, Life insurance and allowances for: Education, Housing, Relocation, Home leave, Annual holiday entitlement of 30 days + public holidays.

*Benefits are tax free subject to compliance with tax regulations of country of citizenship.

Applications:Applicants should provide a cover letter and curriculum vitae: a list of publications and names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience should be included in the curriculum vitae. The position title and reference number: PL/PTVC/04/2014 should be clearly indicated in the subject line of the cover letter.

All applications to be submitted online on our recruitment portal: http://ilri.simplicant.com. Screening of applications will start on 1 May 2014 and continue until the position is filled.

To find out more about ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/

Suitably qualified women and citizens of developing countries, with experience of working internationally, are particularly encouraged to apply.

More ILRI jobs

Subscribe by email to ILRI jobs alert


New project addresses worries about drought in Guatemala

CRP 7 News -

According to climate models, the probability of El Niño is going up, and there are concerns about how well Guatemala will cope.

Just in time to address the minister’s worries, the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) recently launched a project to analyze how well Guatemala’s Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock (MAGA) will deal with extreme climatic conditions. The idea is to use the research to improve planning and decision-making through a joint learning process.

During the workshop Climate Resilient Planning: Interdisciplinary Research to Improve Information Provision for Decision Making a policy brief published by CCAFS and MAGA, with the support of the Central American Agricultural Council (CAC) and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) were also highlighted.

The document talks about the state-of-the-art of climate change, agriculture and food security in Guatemala, and shows that the country has made ​​efforts in both policy and research to address the different challenges in its territory, particularly with framework legislation on climate change and an increase in the trend of research and development projects towards adaptation and mitigation. Download the document here (in Spanish).

During the launch of the project, Carlos Anzueto, the vice-minister of rural development, emphasized how the project would strengthen the ministry’s work by helping to create protocols to deal with agro-climatic risks.

How so? To begin with, the project will use “simulation” exercises to prepare people for future events. Like a fire drill, the simulation exercise will help spot any response problems and train government workers in the process. The goal is to avoid learning by “trial-and-error”, which has a very high cost in this case. Unlike many other natural disasters, drought is a slow onset disaster. It can be predicted using climate models, but its effect on food security creeps in unnoticed until it suddenly becomes very visible. Simulations for more sudden events, like floods, have been done before in Guatemala, but this is a first for drought simulation. 

Minister Elmer López. Inaugural speech during the launch of the project. Photo: v. mora

During the launch of the project, participants from across the ministry and different parts of the country participated in a dynamic exercise to define how the drought simulation exercise should look like. Most participants did not previously know about the recently formulated drought response protocol in detail and based on their comments and ideas to improve the current system, many creative suggestions came up about the content of the simulation, including technical aspects such as involving computers to process data, as well as social aspects such as using role-play.

The project will also establish an online learning platform, where experts and practitioners can discuss their experiences and improve responses to climatic events.

The project will be led by Bioversity International, with the participation of the Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center (CATIE), the International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) and Action contre le Faim – Spain, who are collaborating intensively with the Guatemalan Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock through its Climate Change Unit. The project is being financed by CCAFS and the Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research (IAI).

External links:

Propose an experimental impact evaluation to show evidence on the impact of CGIAR technologies

CRP 3.7 News -

‘The CGIAR Independent Science and Partnership Council‘s Standing Panel on Impact Assessment (SPIA) is soliciting expressions of interest for experimental impact evaluation projects. SPIA invites researchers from academic institutions and from CGIAR Centers/CRPs to submit proposals for impact evaluation projects that are based on an experimental design (randomized design or natural experiments).’

The overall budget available for this call is USD 900,000, 2 to 4 proposals will be awarded.

Visit the SPIA website for more details

 


Filed under: CGIAR, Impact Assessment

Big Facts: Climate impacts on production

CRP 7 News -

This story spotlights some of the Big Facts on food emissions, and is part of a special blog series to complement the new Big Facts infographics website.

It is clear that climate change will have an impact on crops, livestock and fishing – and it is clear that this impact will be fairly large in some areas – what is not clear is how this impact will play out.

Some areas will benefit from increased temperatures; this will probably be the case in the relatively cold Northern/Northwestern Europe. Other areas will develop novel climates, completely new combinations of temperatures and seasonality of rainfall that have never before been experienced in human history. The challenge of adapting to climate change and finding suitable crops will be especially challenging in those areas, which Williams et al. 2007 estimated will cover as much as 12-39 % of the earth’s terrestrial surface at current high emissions levels.

In general, it is expected that climate change will impact agricultural production in two ways. First, there will be an impact due to increasing levels of climate variability: increased risk of climate-related disasters, which result from a combination of climate extremes and the exposure and vulnerability of natural- and human systems; more seasonal climate-variability (e.g. shift in runoff, unpredictable precipitation and seasonal warming). Second, there will be an impact due to long-term trends in climatic means, which could involve gradual change or, when thresholds are reached, non-linear changes.

Drought and floods to come hand-in-hand

With higher temperatures and changes to precipitation patterns, it is expected that by 2050, climate change will cause an increase in extreme droughts, especially in the subtropics and low- and mid-latitudes. Some areas will see increased precipitation, which will generally be concentrated into shorter rainfall periods - that is, more intense rain, increasing the risk of floods, but overall, the land areas experiencing increased water stress will be twice the size of those areas that will experience less water stress.

Uncertain crop changes to come

It is without doubt that climate change will impact crop yields, but due to large variation among locations and crop types, the resulting impacts are hard to estimate. Changes in yields of rainfed crops will be driven by changes in both precipitation and temperature, while changes in yields on irrigated land will be driven by temperature changes alone, provided enough water will be available to maintain irrigation, which in many regions is less than certain.

As climate change progresses and changes in temperature and precipitation sets in, it is increasingly likely that current cropping systems will no longer be viable in many locations. A study by Jones and Thornton (2009) found that, in Africa, maize cultivation will no longer be viable across up to 3% of the continent under both high and low emissions scenarios. These areas, which support 35 million people at present, are expected to switch from mixed crop–livestock systems to livestock only.

Livestock impacted through feed and pastures

Although switching to livestock systems will be an option for some people in some places, changes in climate and climatic variability is also expected to affect livestock farming, inevitably having an impact on the 1.3 billion poor people whose livelihoods are wholly or partially dependent on them. Thornton et al. (2009) found that climate change may affect livestock production most strongly by altering the quantity and quality of pastures and harvested feed available for animals.

Impact on fisheries not an even spread

The impact of climate change on marine fisheries is expected to differ significantly across the major marine fishing regions, as can be seen in the below map, developed by Cheung et al (2010) and reproduced by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS). Some regions will experience a relative decline in catch and others a relative growth, but the outcome for people dependent on fisheries will also depend heavily on which fisheries policies are enacted in their region.

Forests ecosystems already responding

Increased CO2-concentration might have a ‘greening’ impact in some forests areas, but although climate change might be beneficial to some forest areas, it could prove disastrous for other areas. For instance, Allen et al. (2010) found that “forest ecosystems are already responding to climate change, raising concern that forests around the world are becoming increasingly vulnerable to higher tree mortality rates and die-off as a response to increases in drought-events and higher temperatures, even in areas that are – under normal circumstances – not considered to be water-limited”.

Sea level rise will lead to inundation and flooding of agricultural land

In the newest report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) it was found that global mean sea level rise for the 2081−2100-period relative to the 1986–2005-period, will likely be in the ranges of 0.26 to 0.82 m. This could lead to inundation and recurrent flooding in association with storm surges and saltwater intrusion in surface water, aquifers and agricultural land, posing problems for people who are dependent on these areas for drinking water, irrigation and farming.


HAVE YOUR SAY

As is probably clear from the above, the impacts from climate change on various aspects of food production will be numerous. Because of the inherent uncertainties of climate change, even our best predictions of those future changes are more or less uncertain. With Big Facts, we have tried to collect the best, most scientifically thorough and up-to-date research in various areas. I encourage you to explore the data on the Food Impacts Production page of the Big Facts website, and to consult the various references if you would like to know more. Should you have any comments on any of the findings, these are more than welcome. Simply comment below or send us an email. 

From Transition to Transformation: Food Security in Central Asia

CRP 2: program news -

CentralAsia2

Source: flickr (United Nations Development Programme in Europe and CIS)
Harvesting barley (Kyrgyzstan)

Cross-posted from IFPRIApril 7, 2014, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan— A conference organized by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) and the University of Central Asia (UCA) to be held from April 8-9 will explore how Central Asian countries can best meet the needs of present and future populations for adequate access to nutritious and safe foods and improve food and nutrition security.  

During the two-day event, government officials, development partners, and researchers from the region and abroad will share perspectives on agricultural and structural transformation, value chains, food safety and nutrition, agricultural markets and trade, modern input use and constraints on agricultural productivity improvements, climate change, remittances, and other emerging issues in agriculture and food security in Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, and the region as a whole.

“An adequate diet of safe and nutritious food is a necessity—both for individuals to fulfill their human potential and for nations to meet targets for growth and prosperity,” said Karen Brooks, Director of CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM). “How to feed a growing population now and in the future remains a challenge, but it is one that can be met. This conference opens a joint effort to explore how evidence can be applied to decisions on food security in the specific context of Central Asia.”

The conference will also unveil IFPRI’s new Central Asia Research and Capacity Strengthening Program, implemented in partnership with the Eurasian Center for Food Security at Moscow State University, the University of Central Asia, and other research institutions in the region, in collaboration with PIM and the CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health. The new program will contribute to ensuring food and nutrition security, improving livelihoods, and conserving natural resources through sustainable agricultural development in Central Asia.

“The University of Central Asia is pleased to partner with IFPRI and co-host this conference,” said UCA Director General Bohdan Krawchenko. “Our research institutes are working to generate both information and skills that can be directly applied to addressing critical issues facing the region, and there can be no more urgent issue than food security within the context of the region’s other vulnerabilities.”

For his part, Kamiljon Akramov, the program leader and research fellow at IFPRI, commented: “We hope the conference will shed some light on how to boost the agricultural sector and improve food and nutrition security in Central Asia, and inform future research and capacity building activities for IFPRI and its partners.”

In the last decade, Central Asia has experienced significant agricultural and economic growth as well as improvements in household welfare. However, food and nutrition insecurity persists among the most vulnerable. Stunting (low height for age) rates for children under five—a common indicator of malnutrition—remain relatively high in Central Asia, ranging from 13 percent in Kazakhstan to 39 percent in Tajikistan, according to the most recent data from UNICEF and the World Bank.

#

The University of Central Asia (UCA) was founded in 2000 by the Presidents of Tajikistan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Kazakhstan and His Highness the Aga Khan to offer an internationally-recognized standard of higher education in Central Asia and prepare graduates to contribute leadership, ideas and innovation to the economies and communities of the region. For more information on the UCA, please visit: www.ucentralasia.org.

The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) seeks sustainable solutions for ending hunger and poverty. IFPRI was established in 1975 to identify and analyze alternative national and international strategies and policies for meeting the food needs of the developing world, with particular emphasis on low-income countries and on the poorer groups in those countries. www.ifpri.org

The CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM) leads action-oriented research to equip decisionmakers with the evidence required to develop food and agricultural policies that better serve the interests of poor producers and consumers, both men and women. PIM combines the resources of 13 CGIAR centers and numerous international, regional, and national partners. The program is led by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). www.pim.cgiar.org

The CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (A4NH) helps realize the potential of agricultural development to deliver gender-equitable health and nutritional benefits to the poor. This program is led by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). www.a4nh.cgiar.org

Download press-release (English)

Download press-release (Russian)

 

Pages

Subscribe to International Livestock Research Institute aggregator