Feed aggregator

ILRI Vacancy: Post-Doctoral Scientist – Feed and Forages Biosciences (closing date 15 May 2016)

Jobs -

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) seeks to recruit a Post-doctoral Scientist for its Feed & Forage Biosciences program, a new research program established to build capacity in upstream research on feeds and forages. The program aims to take advantage of opportunities afforded by recent scientific developments in genomics and related sciences, together with the extensive collection of genetic resources held in ILRI’s forage genebank.

ILRI works with partners worldwide to enhance the roles that livestock play in food security and poverty alleviation, principally in Africa and Asia. The outcomes of these research partnerships help people in developing countries keep their farm animals’ alive and productive, increase and sustain their livestock and farm productivity, find profitable markets for their animal products, and reduce the risk of livestock-related diseases. www.ilri.org

ILRI is a not-for-profit institution with a staff of approximately 700 and in 2016, an operating budget of around USD 83 million. A member of the CGIAR Consortium working for a food-secure future, ILRI has its headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya, a principal campus in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and offices in other countries in East, West and Southern Africa and in South, Southeast and East Asia. www.cgiar.org

Responsibilities:

The role will contribute to the team working in the area of forage genetic resource evaluation and exploitation, more specifically to carry out research related to gene discovery and genomics assisted improvement of Napier grass. Activities will include:

  • Mining genomic databases and publications of related grass species for candidate genes and gene variants associated with target traits.
  • RNA sequencing to generate a comprehensive unigene collection as a mapping reference for differential gene expression analysis. These data will also be utilized to extract polymorphisms existing between genotypes.
  • Initial development of GBS-derived markers which, together with gene-based SSR and SNP markers developed from the RNA-seq results will be used to begin genotyping accessions.

Requirements:

  • A PhD and up to 3 years’ experience in plant molecular biology/molecular breeding or a related discipline. Specific knowledge in the area of improvement of tropical and sub-tropical forages would be considered an advantage.
  • Experience in interrogating genomic databases and the design of molecular markers, preferably with expertise in Genomic Selection or Genotyping by Sequencing technologies.
  • Excellent communication skills in English (both written and oral), with demonstrated ability to communicate complex information to a range of audiences in a clear and confident manner.
  • Strong organizational skills and a demonstrated ability to deliver successful project outcomes (both independently and within a team environment), taking initiative, being proactive at problem solving and prioritizing and organizing your own work as required.

Post location: The position will be based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Position level: Post-doctoral level.

Duration: The position is on a 2 years fixed term contract.

Benefits: ILRI offers a competitive salary and benefits package which includes medical insurance, life insurance and allowances for: education, housing, home leave, and annual holiday entitlement of 30 days + public holidays.

Applications:

Applicants should send a cover letter and CV explaining their interest in the position, what they can bring to the role and the names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience to the Director, People and Organizational Development through our recruitment portal http://ilri.simplicant.com/ before 15 May, 2016.   The position title and reference number: F&F/Bios/04/2016 should be clearly marked on the subject line of the online application.

We thank all applicants for their interest in working for ILRI. Due to the volume of applications, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

ILRI does not charge a fee at any stage of the recruitment process (application, interview meeting, processing or training). ILRI also does not concern itself with information on applicants’ bank accounts.

To find out more about ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/

 ILRI is an equal opportunity employer.

More ILRI jobs

Subscribe by email to ILRI jobs alert


‘Wonder Women’ of Bhubaneswar

Spotlight from ILRI news -

DSC_4496_TempleCarving_Cropped.jpg

Temple carving in Bhubaneswar (this and all photos on this page by ILRI/Susan MacMillan).

Note: This is the fifth in a series of articles on
‘Curds and goats, lives and livelihoods—
A dozen stories from northern and eastern India’.
PART 5: The ‘Wonder Women’ of Bhubaneswar

By Susan MacMillan, of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

8 Mar 2016: 5:30 am
My communications colleague at the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) Jules Mateo and I are in the lobby of our hotel in New Delhi checking out. I’m groggy, having been up all night catching up on emails and finalizing a blog article to celebrate ‘women in livestock development’ (aka, WILD) on this day, which happens to be International Women’s Day. I’m a few minutes late getting down to the lobby to check out.

A taxi waits to take us to the airport for our early morning flight to Bhubaneswar, capital of India’s eastern state of Odisha (formerly, and still commonly, known as ‘Orissa’). On arriving at the Delhi airport and quickly entering, we find we’re in time for our flight but I’m still relieved when two women from Air Vistara, the newish domestic airline we’re using, approach us to ask us to move a new queue. I assume our check-in is being expedited.

But no, that’s not what’s happening. What’s happening is that we’re both being bumped up to business class. It turns out that Air Vistara (‘vistaar’ means ‘limitless expanse’ in Sanskrit) is making a big effort to celebrate International Women’s Day, and Jules and I have just been selected to receive some special treatment. This felicitous pre-dawn airport incident will turn out to be just the first of many day-long occasions marking this special day in India.

DSC_4508_Delhi_Airport_FestiveUpgradedTicket_Cropped

Memento of the upgrade!

On receipt of our new business class tickets and boarding cards (stapled with festive yellow ribbons), we’re each handed a little bouquet of flowers. The airline women ask if we’d mind having our pictures taken with them (of course not!) and then we make our way, giddy with excitement about our unwarranted upgrade, to the gate. The whole airport appears to be conspiring in this celebration: the woman who pats us down at the security check, for instance, wishes us a ‘Happy International Women’s Day’, as do several others.

Boarding our plane, we’re directed to our comfy business class seats and offered a selection of the day’s morning papers and a freshly squeezed juice before take off. The stewardesses give us every possible attention on our (now too short) flight. (I spend most of the 1.5 hours catching up on my sleep and am sad to miss the elaborate Indian breakfast.)

As we land, our ever-attentive stewardesses ask if we’d mind staying behind as everyone else gets off the plane so that another series of pictures can be taken. This time the pilot comes back to join us in the selfies and other mobile snaps—and it turns out the pilot is another Indian woman. In fact, everyone handling this flight appears to be a woman, reminding me of the news splash the previous Nov about an all-female crew on an Ethiopian Air flight from Addis Ababa to Bangkok, with—the media reported breathlessly—‘the daughters of Lucy’ fully operating the journey, from ground to sky, on the eve of that airline’s 70th anniversary.

A delicate fact that I have as yet omitted to mention is that Jules and I are travelling with three of our superiors, our director general Jimmy Smith and his wife Charmaine as well as ILRI’s representative for South Asia, Alok Jha. Our embarrassment about travelling business as they sit back in coach, and about getting so much attention from everyone all morning, becomes a joke as Braja Swain, an ILRI scientist and project leader in this state, packs us all into a vehicle to take us to the Bhubaneswar hotel where Jules and I will be staying that night.

As the joke continues on our way from the airport, we pass billboard signs promoting International Women’s Day (the whole country has been infected!). This reminds Jha that he once spent a few months working for an institute in Bhubaneswar that solely serves women farmers, the only such institute in all of Asia, he says.

8:30 am
Alok Jha gets out his cell phone and puts a call in to a colleague he still knows there, suggesting that as our ILRI delegation is in town for the day, we could pay a visit to the institute that afternoon, at their convenience. Jha’s call is transferred to the head of this institute, who immediately extends us a warm invitation for us to visit her after lunch.

Bhubaneswar_Collage_VIPvenues

Scenes of our series of morning courtesy calls on government and university VIPs in Bhubaneswar.

10:00 am
Which is what—following a morning spent making courtesy calls on various senior government officials and university professors to discuss livestock research collaborations—we do.

Bhubaneswar_Collage_VIPvisits

Memento of some of the VIPs the ILRI delegation visited in Bhubaneswar.

DSC_4400_Bhubaneswar_CIWA_SignboardForIWD_Cropped

Poster advertising celebrations at Bhubaneswar’s Central Institute for Women in Agriculture to mark International Women’s Day.

2:00 pm
The Central Institute for Women in Agriculture belongs to the vast network that makes up the Indian Council for Agricultural Research. As we enter the large building housing the institute, we’re immediately shown to the director’s office. Jatinder Kishtwaria is waiting for us and serves us chai and an assortment of India’s milk-based sweets. We introduce ourselves and enquire about her institute’s programs, which, she explains, she herself is just getting to know as she took up her position just 20 days previously. After 20 minutes or so, we thank her and begin to make polite noises about taking our leave.

As our host walks us out her door, we catch something she says about a ‘program’. We dutifully follow her down a hallway and enter a large conference room filled with people seated, where, it quickly transpires, the senior members of our little delegation have been made honoured guests at an event about to start. The Smiths and Alok Jha are handed bouquets of flowers and shown to their seats on the raised dais at the front, along with the other speakers on what, we now understand, is a whole afternoon’s program marking International Women’s Day.

Bhubaneswar_Collage_SmithJhaSmith

Jimmy Smith, Alok Jha and Charmaine Smith all made impromptu speeches at an event held on 8 Mar 2016 celebrating International Women’s Day at the Central Institute for Women in Agriculture, in Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India.

The afternoon’s proceedings could not have been more delightful, nor we more delighted to be taking part. Jimmy Smith, Alok Jha and Charmaine Smith each gave a little impromptu speech (Jha noting that ‘Every day should be International Women’s Day!’). One of the women who spoke received an award for her agricultural entrepreneurship. Several staff of the institute recounted the history of women in Indian agriculture, what the institute had achieved in working for them, and how far the world had advanced in helping agricultural women advance. And how much remained to be done.

At the close of the program, we leave the conference room to take chai, consumed with a box of milk sweets, while chatting with the other guests and taking in several special exhibits and poster displays.

Bhubaneswar_Collage_Women

(Top) Nehru quote hung above an office door at CIWA; (bottom left) Jatinder Kishtwariathe, director of CIWA, reflects on the day with ILRI’s Charmaine Smith; (top right) two of the many women guests at the event; (centre right), the CIWA staff member who was master of ceremonies at the event; (bottom right) the woman bestowed an award for her agricultural entrepreneurship .

Among the exhibits set up were several tables displaying small replicas of agricultural implements designed to reduce the labour or danger of farm work traditionally done by women in India. While inspiring to see that such improvements are being made, and that the prices of the tools are subsidized by the government to make them more affordable by poor women, it also broke the heart a bit to see how rudimentary are the advances and how heavy remains the menial load and drudgery work of India’s hundreds of millions of farm women.

Bhubaneswar_Collage_FarmTools3

As Nehru so rightly indicated, it is the women of India who, once on the move, will get the nation moving. Certainly, we met some of these ‘Wonder Women’ of Bhubaneswar on this auspicious day.

With many thanks to Jatinder Kishtwaria and her colleagues at ICAR’s Central Institute for Women in Agriculture for the great work they are doing and for their inspiring afternoon’s event.

Read previous parts in this blog series
‘Curds and goats, lives and livelihoods—A dozen stories from northern and eastern India’

Part 1, Colourful convocation: Jimmy Smith addresses graduates of India’s prestigious National Dairy Research Institute, 30 Mar 2016.

Part 2: Elite buffaloes and other exemplars of advanced Indian dairy science at the National Dairy Research Institute, 31 Mar 2016.

Part 3: Culture of the cow: Curds in the city—Better living through smallholder dairying in northern India, 5 Apr 2016.

Part 4: Building better brands and lives through peri-urban dairying and smart crop-dairy farming, 6 Apr 2016

View all photos of the ILRI delegation in Bhubaneswar: ILRI Flickr album.

Read more about ILRI work in India and work in India conducted by the ILRI-led multi-institutional CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish, which works to improve the livelihoods of India’s smallholder dairy farmers by increasing participation of poor producers, processors and sellers in the country’s dairy value chains, improving access to markets by poor dairy producers and training small-scale dairy producers in more efficient production methods.

 

 

 


‘Wonder Women’ of Bhubaneswar

News from ILRI -

DSC_4496_TempleCarving_Cropped.jpg

Temple carving in Bhubaneswar (this and all photos on this page by ILRI/Susan MacMillan).

Note: This is the fifth in a series of articles on
‘Curds and goats, lives and livelihoods—
A dozen stories from northern and eastern India’.
PART 5: The ‘Wonder Women’ of Bhubaneswar

By Susan MacMillan, of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

8 Mar 2016: 5:30 am
My communications colleague at the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) Jules Mateo and I are in the lobby of our hotel in New Delhi checking out. I’m groggy, having been up all night catching up on emails and finalizing a blog article to celebrate ‘women in livestock development’ (aka, WILD) on this day, which happens to be International Women’s Day. I’m a few minutes late getting down to the lobby to check out.

A taxi waits to take us to the airport for our early morning flight to Bhubaneswar, capital of India’s eastern state of Odisha (formerly, and still commonly, known as ‘Orissa’). On arriving at the Delhi airport and quickly entering, we find we’re in time for our flight but I’m still relieved when two women from Air Vistara, the newish domestic airline we’re using, approach us to ask us to move a new queue. I assume our check-in is being expedited.

But no, that’s not what’s happening. What’s happening is that we’re both being bumped up to business class. It turns out that Air Vistara (‘vistaar’ means ‘limitless expanse’ in Sanskrit) is making a big effort to celebrate International Women’s Day, and Jules and I have just been selected to receive some special treatment. This felicitous pre-dawn airport incident will turn out to be just the first of many day-long occasions marking this special day in India.

DSC_4508_Delhi_Airport_FestiveUpgradedTicket_Cropped

Memento of the upgrade!

On receipt of our new business class tickets and boarding cards (stapled with festive yellow ribbons), we’re each handed a little bouquet of flowers. The airline women ask if we’d mind having our pictures taken with them (of course not!) and then we make our way, giddy with excitement about our unwarranted upgrade, to the gate. The whole airport appears to be conspiring in this celebration: the woman who pats us down at the security check, for instance, wishes us a ‘Happy International Women’s Day’, as do several others.

Boarding our plane, we’re directed to our comfy business class seats and offered a selection of the day’s morning papers and a freshly squeezed juice before take off. The stewardesses give us every possible attention on our (now too short) flight. (I spend most of the 1.5 hours catching up on my sleep and am sad to miss the elaborate Indian breakfast.)

As we land, our ever-attentive stewardesses ask if we’d mind staying behind as everyone else gets off the plane so that another series of pictures can be taken. This time the pilot comes back to join us in the selfies and other mobile snaps—and it turns out the pilot is another Indian woman. In fact, everyone handling this flight appears to be a woman, reminding me of the news splash the previous Nov about an all-female crew on an Ethiopian Air flight from Addis Ababa to Bangkok, with—the media reported breathlessly—‘the daughters of Lucy’ fully operating the journey, from ground to sky, on the eve of that airline’s 70th anniversary.

A delicate fact that I have as yet omitted to mention is that Jules and I are travelling with three of our superiors, our director general Jimmy Smith and his wife Charmaine as well as ILRI’s representative for South Asia, Alok Jha. Our embarrassment about travelling business as they sit back in coach, and about getting so much attention from everyone all morning, becomes a joke as Braja Swain, an ILRI scientist and project leader in this state, packs us all into a vehicle to take us to the Bhubaneswar hotel where Jules and I will be staying that night.

As the joke continues on our way from the airport, we pass billboard signs promoting International Women’s Day (the whole country has been infected!). This reminds Jha that he once spent a few months working for an institute in Bhubaneswar that solely serves women farmers, the only such institute in all of Asia, he says.

8:30 am
Alok Jha gets out his cell phone and puts a call in to a colleague he still knows there, suggesting that as our ILRI delegation is in town for the day, we could pay a visit to the institute that afternoon, at their convenience. Jha’s call is transferred to the head of this institute, who immediately extends us a warm invitation for us to visit her after lunch.

Bhubaneswar_Collage_VIPvenues

Scenes of our series of morning courtesy calls on government and university VIPs in Bhubaneswar.

10:00 am
Which is what—following a morning spent making courtesy calls on various senior government officials and university professors to discuss livestock research collaborations—we do.

Bhubaneswar_Collage_VIPvisits

Memento of some of the VIPs the ILRI delegation visited in Bhubaneswar.

DSC_4400_Bhubaneswar_CIWA_SignboardForIWD_Cropped

Poster advertising celebrations at Bhubaneswar’s Central Institute for Women in Agriculture to mark International Women’s Day.

2:00 pm
The Central Institute for Women in Agriculture belongs to the vast network that makes up the Indian Council for Agricultural Research. As we enter the large building housing the institute, we’re immediately shown to the director’s office. Jatinder Kishtwaria is waiting for us and serves us chai and an assortment of India’s milk-based sweets. We introduce ourselves and enquire about her institute’s programs, which, she explains, she herself is just getting to know as she took up her position just 20 days previously. After 20 minutes or so, we thank her and begin to make polite noises about taking our leave.

As our host walks us out her door, we catch something she says about a ‘program’. We dutifully follow her down a hallway and enter a large conference room filled with people seated, where, it quickly transpires, the senior members of our little delegation have been made honoured guests at an event about to start. The Smiths and Alok Jha are handed bouquets of flowers and shown to their seats on the raised dais at the front, along with the other speakers on what, we now understand, is a whole afternoon’s program marking International Women’s Day.

Bhubaneswar_Collage_SmithJhaSmith

Jimmy Smith, Alok Jha and Charmaine Smith all made impromptu speeches at an event held on 8 Mar 2016 celebrating International Women’s Day at the Central Institute for Women in Agriculture, in Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India.

The afternoon’s proceedings could not have been more delightful, nor we more delighted to be taking part. Jimmy Smith, Alok Jha and Charmaine Smith each gave a little impromptu speech (Jha noting that ‘Every day should be International Women’s Day!’). One of the women who spoke received an award for her agricultural entrepreneurship. Several staff of the institute recounted the history of women in Indian agriculture, what the institute had achieved in working for them, and how far the world had advanced in helping agricultural women advance. And how much remained to be done.

At the close of the program, we leave the conference room to take chai, consumed with a box of milk sweets, while chatting with the other guests and taking in several special exhibits and poster displays.

Bhubaneswar_Collage_Women

(Top) Nehru quote hung above an office door at CIWA; (bottom left) Jatinder Kishtwariathe, director of CIWA, reflects on the day with ILRI’s Charmaine Smith; (top right) two of the many women guests at the event; (centre right), the CIWA staff member who was master of ceremonies at the event; (bottom right) the woman bestowed an award for her agricultural entrepreneurship .

Among the exhibits set up were several tables displaying small replicas of agricultural implements designed to reduce the labour or danger of farm work traditionally done by women in India. While inspiring to see that such improvements are being made, and that the prices of the tools are subsidized by the government to make them more affordable by poor women, it also broke the heart a bit to see how rudimentary are the advances and how heavy remains the menial load and drudgery work of India’s hundreds of millions of farm women.

Bhubaneswar_Collage_FarmTools3

As Nehru so rightly indicated, it is the women of India who, once on the move, will get the nation moving. Certainly, we met some of these ‘Wonder Women’ of Bhubaneswar on this auspicious day.

With many thanks to Jatinder Kishtwaria and her colleagues at ICAR’s Central Institute for Women in Agriculture for the great work they are doing and for their inspiring afternoon’s event.

Read previous parts in this blog series
‘Curds and goats, lives and livelihoods—A dozen stories from northern and eastern India’

Part 1, Colourful convocation: Jimmy Smith addresses graduates of India’s prestigious National Dairy Research Institute, 30 Mar 2016.

Part 2: Elite buffaloes and other exemplars of advanced Indian dairy science at the National Dairy Research Institute, 31 Mar 2016.

Part 3: Culture of the cow: Curds in the city—Better living through smallholder dairying in northern India, 5 Apr 2016.

Part 4: Building better brands and lives through peri-urban dairying and smart crop-dairy farming, 6 Apr 2016

View all photos of the ILRI delegation in Bhubaneswar: ILRI Flickr album.

Read more about ILRI work in India and work in India conducted by the ILRI-led multi-institutional CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish, which works to improve the livelihoods of India’s smallholder dairy farmers by increasing participation of poor producers, processors and sellers in the country’s dairy value chains, improving access to markets by poor dairy producers and training small-scale dairy producers in more efficient production methods.

 

 

 


Endemicity of zoonotic diseases in pigs and humans in lowland and upland Lao PDR: Identification of socio-cultural risk factors

Our latest outputs -

Endemicity of zoonotic diseases in pigs and humans in lowland and upland Lao PDR: Identification of socio-cultural risk factors Holt, H.R.; Inthavong, P.; Boualam, K.; Blaszak, K.; Keokamphe, C.; Somoulay, V.; Phongmany, A.; Durr, P.A.; Graham, K.; Allen, J.; Donnelly, B.; Blacksell, S.D.; Unger, F.; Grace, D.; Alonso, S.; Gilbert, J. In Lao People’s Democratic Republic pigs are kept in close contact with families. Human risk of infection with pig zoonoses arises from direct contact and consumption of unsafe pig products. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Luang Prabang (north) and Savannakhet (central-south) Provinces. A total of 59 villages, 895 humans and 647 pigs were sampled and serologically tested for zoonotic pathogens including: hepatitis E virus (HEV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and Trichinella spiralis; In addition, human sera were tested for Taenia spp. and cysticercosis. Seroprevalence of zoonotic pathogens in humans was high for HEV (Luang Prabang: 48.6%, Savannakhet: 77.7%) and T. spiralis (Luang Prabang: 59.0%, Savannakhet: 40.5%), and lower for JEV (around 5%), Taenia spp. (around 3%) and cysticercosis (Luang Prabang: 6.1, Savannakhet 1.5%). Multiple correspondence analysis and hierarchical clustering of principal components was performed on descriptive data of human hygiene practices, contact with pigs and consumption of pork products. Three clusters were identified: Cluster 1 had low pig contact and good hygiene practices, but had higher risk of T. spiralis. Most people in cluster 2 were involved in pig slaughter (83.7%), handled raw meat or offal (99.4%) and consumed raw pigs’ blood (76.4%). Compared to cluster 1, cluster 2 had increased odds of testing seropositive for HEV and JEV. Cluster 3 had the lowest sanitation access and had the highest risk of HEV, cysticercosis and Taenia spp. Farmers which kept their pigs tethered (as opposed to penned) and disposed of manure in water sources had 0.85 (95% CI: 0.18 to 0.91) and 2.39 (95% CI: 1.07 to 5.34) times the odds of having pigs test seropositive for HEV, respectively. The results have been used to identify entry-points for intervention and management strategies to reduce disease exposure in humans and pigs, informing control activities in a cysticercosis hyper-endemic village.

Zero deforestation and sustainable production: a tenable couple?

CRP 7 News -

Pablo Pacheco and Sophia Gnych, scientists from the Centre for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) and the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), analyzed long-term efforts and the ways forward for reducing deforestation in Brazil and Indonesia in a recent analysis post called Why ‘zero deforestation’ is only one piece of the sustainability puzzle. CIFOR, CCAFS and partners also produced the short video below.

In Brazil, the authors credit stabilization of deforestation rates to the substantial synergy created by government and private sector stakeholders committing to common goals and increasing accountability through effective monitoring. However, they counsel that ensuring economic opportunities for smallholder and landless women and men in forested regions remains a challenge. Pacheco finds that the joint goals of smallholder inclusion and sustainable supply may play a more catalytic role in Indonesia. They write:

For a solution to be long lasting, it needs certain characteristics: It should make economic sense for all stakeholders, it should support the equitable sharing of costs and benefits related to the new policy environments and market constraints, and it should empower local stakeholders to use natural resources in more sustainable ways.

Solutions

CIFOR and CCAFS are collaborating with public and private actors in the transition towards more sustainable beef cattle and agricultural production through enhanced landscape governance in the “Green Municipality” of Paragominas, State of Pará, in the Brazilian Amazon. In this project, 'Linking sustainable production and enhanced landscape governance in the Amazon: Towards territorial certification (TerraCert),' stakeholders are forming innovative partnerships and exploring production options within the cattle and agricultural sectors to reduce deforestation and greenhouse gas emissions.

The authors summarize learning from Brazil that should guide forest management in the Amazon, Indonesia and elsewhere, with foci on how to develop legal frameworks and support cooperative interactions among public and private sector stakeholders.

According to Pacheco and Gnych:

Key lessons from effective institutional arrangements indicate that it is important to:  
  • Have clear legal frameworks with little scope for ambiguity that can be consistently enforced.
  • Build a transparent monitoring system that is accepted by wider society.
  • Adopt a stepwise approach, mainly with regard to land regularization and commitments to forest restoration.
  • Use economic policy instruments, mainly fiscal transfers and credit, to enforce environmental regulations
  • Further tighten policies constraining land uses, while creating incentives for good practice.
  • Support agreements between the different key actors, such as retailers, industry and the state.

Brazil has achieved an effective solution because they have been able to find complementarities between public regulations and private commitments. Key for the solution to be long lasting is that stakeholders must have common notions of sustainability.

Remaining challenges

While frameworks and policies in Brazil - such as the soybean moratorium, land registration, and industry certifications tied to the farmers' registrations - have certainly been successful, a remaining challenge is to develop a climate-smart system of sustainable intensification in the beef industry that will effectively meet countries' needs to increase production and support small farmers. Currently, intensification is limited to large-scale ranchers and is often based on chemical inputs. Small- and medium-scale ranchers are less involved due to lack of access to capital, insecure land rights, and poor infrastructure.

Pacheco has found that sustainability of supply chains may lead to exclusion of smallholders if it is more expensive for a) industry to trace supplies from smallholders and b) smallholders to adopt recommended practices. Thus, innovation is needed to involve more smallholders - by making the route to sustainability easier for smallholders or by increasing positive incentives, for example.

Challenges remain at the institutional level as well, in Brazil and elsewhere. How can appropriate territorial and jurisdictional approaches under ‘produce and protect’ be systematically developed and scaled up? How can agricultural development and biodiversity conservation be balanced in a way that takes into consideration local socio-economic constraints and trade-offs? How can forest conservation and business models work together to also achieve greater social inclusion?

Read more

Gendered pathways need gendered approaches

CRP 4 program news -

Women watering crops in Ethiopia. (IFPRI/F.G.Mariam)

A new magazine article in Rural 21: The International Journal for Rural Development references the A4NH gender strategy in presenting why really gender matters when it comes to achieving food and nutrition security. Co-authors, Hazel Malapit, A4NH Gender Research Coordinator, and Agnes Quisumbing, IFPRI Senior Research Fellow, demonstrate how the pathways through which agriculture and health can improve nutrition are gendered. Research shows that even within households, the constraints that limit access to nutritious foods, and the preferences on food and resource allocation can both be differentiated by gender, which is why approaches to improving nutrition must also consider gender roles in order to succeed.

Read the full article on the Rural 21 website and learn more about A4NH’s gender work on the Gender-Nutrition Idea Exchange (GNIE) blog.

 

 

 

Pages

Subscribe to International Livestock Research Institute aggregator