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Introducting Solomon Muasa

Latest ILRI announcements -

Solomon MuasaSolomon Muasa joined the People and Organizational Development Directorate on the 15 July, 2015 in the Compensation and Benefits Unit.

Solomon holds a Bachelor of Arts degree with a specialization in Economics, a Diploma in Human Resources Management and is taking an MBA in strategic Management. He is a certified mentor and a member of the Institute of Human Resources Management (IHRM).

He has diverse experience with numerous HR management generalist areas having established HR departments for various organizations in several sectors including; Oil and gas, service sector and the agricultural sector, specifically agro-forestry. He also has a wide knowledge of the operations in the micro-finance sector in Kenya.

Over the past half of the year 2015 he has been a mentor to two HR Officers in both public and private sectors under a USAID & IHRM sponsored mentorship programme.

We are excited to have Solomon aboard. Kindly join us in welcoming him to the ILRI family.

Index-based insurance: Insurance or lottery tickets?

IBLI News -

Environmental shocks are drivers of poverty as well as a fact of life in many rural areas of the developing world. In the developed world, agricultural insurance provides protection from such calamities. But conventional insurance products have not reached many rural households in developing countries due to the high costs of gathering information relative to the size of policies demanded and well-known moral hazard and adverse selection issues that complicate product design and pricing.

Recently, there has been much excitement around the use of index-based insurance as an alternative to conventional insurance products that may extend the rural poor’s access to formal insurance coverage in developing countries (Alderman & Haque 2007; Barnett, Barrett & Skees 2008; Mahul & Stutley 2010). Index insurance provides indemnity payments based on a signal that is related to covariate losses rather than actual and observed individual losses. When signals are chosen properly—easy to observe, exogenous, highly correlated with the insured risk—suppliers of index insurance face much fewer costs associated with adverse section, moral hazard monitoring, and validation of claims than they would if they were offering conventional policies.

Read the full blog post by Nathan Jensen, a Postdoctoral Associate at Cornell’s Dyson School working with the Index  Based Livestock Insurance (IBLI) project at the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI).


New Report: Water, Food Security and Human Dignity

CRP 5: Program news -

The tenth volume of the Swedish FAO Committee’s series of discussion papers has recently been published. Authored by Jan Lundqvist and Jenny Grönwall of the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) and Anders Jägerskog at Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida), the report discusses the global significance of water for food security for different groups of people.

WLE Program Director Andrew Noble contributed to the report by outlining some specific criteria for sustainable agricultural intensification. Pointing out that it is no longer enough to just increase yields without adverse environmental impacts and the cultivation of more land, he argues that it is also important to:

  • manage land, water and ecosystems in a way that enhances field, watershed and regional scales to deal with more frequent multiple shocks
  • secure long-term viability by ensuring that agricultural impacts on Earth system processes are minimized, to avoid disrupting the Earth system. Instead, he suggests that it is critical to consider the earth’s planetary boundaries and to eradicate hunger poverty while considering the what it means to have resilient earth systems

Read SIWI’s announcement.

Read the full report.

The post New Report: Water, Food Security and Human Dignity appeared first on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

ILRI vacancy: Livestock value chain manager (closing, 21 August 2015)

Jobs -

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) seeks to recruit a Livestock value chain manager to lead the implementation and monitoring of a livestock value chain development project in selected counties in Kenya (Garissa, Marsabit, Wajir, Isiolo and Turkana).

As part of a larger USAID-funded agriculture development program, ILRI is leading a project to accelerate the impact of livestock market interventions on household incomes, with the goal to reduce poverty and hunger in these five USAID Resilience Zones of Influence counties of Kenya.  The focus is on taking successful interventions to scale to achieve broad impact on agricultural incomes and nutrition.  The interventions span four areas: Enhancing market access, increasing livestock productivity, enhancing the enabling environment and improving nutrition for women and children.

ILRI works with partners worldwide to enhance the roles that livestock play in food security and poverty alleviation, principally in Africa and Asia. The outcomes of these research partnerships help people in developing countries keep their farm animals’ alive and productive, increase and sustain their livestock and farm productivity, find profitable markets for their animal products, and reduce the risk of livestock-related diseases. www.ilri.org

ILRI is a not-for-profit institution with a staff of about 700 and in 2015, an operating budget of about USD 83 million. A member of the CGIAR Consortium working for a food-secure future, ILRI has its headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya, a principal campus in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and offices in other countries in East, West and Southern Africa and in South, Southeast and East Asia. www.cgiar.org

Responsibilities

The Livestock Value Chain Manager will coordinate the overall project with responsibilities as follows:

  • Lead the identification and development of appropriate technological and institutional innovations required to achieve the project set targets, working with stakeholders, partners and researchers.
  • Coordinate the implementation of the agreed interventions by developing contracts with local partners and monitoring partners’ interventions.
  • Ensure that USAID and county government’s priorities are included in the design and implementation of the project.
  • Liaise with the USAID Partnership for Resilience and Economic Growth.
  • Coordinate Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) activities with the lead M&E team at the consortium level, in particular in relation to the design and collection of monitoring data at partners’ level, as well as for the overall monitoring surveys.
  • Lead the write up of the livestock value chain reports and other M&E activities as per the set M&E framework.

Requirements

  • PhD in Agricultural Economics, Agri-business, development studies or related field and 4 years field experience OR MSc in relevant field plus 8 years field experience.
  • Experience in designing and/or implementing value chain development interventions for livestock in developing or emerging economies.
  • Experience working with implementing development partners.
  • Excellent inter-personal skills and proven ability to lead a team.
  • Good knowledge of monitoring & evaluation framework and systems. (Knowledge of USAID Feed the Future M&E framework will be an advantage).
  • Willingness to travel frequently in rural areas in Kenya.
  • Spoken Kiswahili skills strongly desired.

Post location: The position is based in ILRI Nairobi, Kenya.

Position level: Scientist Level 1, dependent on qualifications and experience.

Duration: 3 years with the possibility of renewal, contingent upon individual performance and continued funding.

Benefits: ILRI offers a competitive salary and benefits package which includes 15% Pension, Medical insurance, Life insurance and allowances for: Education, Housing, Relocation, Home leave, Annual holiday entitlement of 30 days + public holidays.

How to apply: Applicants should send a cover letter and CV explaining their interest in the position, what they can bring to the job and the names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience to the Director, People and Organizational Development. The position title and reference number REF: LSE/ 07/2015 should be clearly marked on the subject line of the cover letter.

All applications to be submitted online on our recruitment portal: http://ilri.simplicant.com by 21 August 2015.

ILRI is an equal opportunity employer.

To find out more about ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org

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ILRI Kenya: Closure of the children playing ground

Latest ILRI announcements -

Please note that we shall be closing the ILRI Children’s playing ground from today, Tuesday, July 21, 2015 to Friday, July 24, 2015. This shall enable us do some works on the lowering of the see saw heights and other finalizations.

The facility shall be reopened for normal use on Saturday, July 25, 2015.

Apologies for the inconveniences that may be caused.

Kind regards.
Wanjawa, W. B.
Engineering

Sign up for the Great Ethiopian Run

Latest ILRI announcements -

We are glad to inform you that ILRI will sponsor the first 50 staff members to take part in the 2015 Ethiopian great run events (http://www.ethiopianrun.org/). Staff who would like to take part in the event can sign-up at the Zebu club before Thursday July 23, 2015 up to 4:00 pm. Staff who are not in the first 50 and family who are not staff can sign-up on a separate registration book by paying Birr 150.

Please note that staff are not allowed to book on behalf of other staff in the first 50 which ILRI will sponsor.

Thank you,
Berhanu Abebe (coach)
Email: b.abebe@cgiar.org

 

 

UK chief scientific adviser visits Kenya: Part 1—Legacy of British-ILRI partnerships in animal health research

Spotlight from ILRI news -

Sir Mark Walport, UK chief science advisor

Sir Mark Walport, the UK chief scientific adviser, listens to ILRI researchers make presentations on international projects to improve livestock and human health in developing countries; Sir Mark visited ILRI’s headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya, and toured its state-of-the-art biosciences laboratories on 15 July 2015 (photo credit: ILRI/Paul Karaimu).

Longstanding ILRI-UK collaborations in animal health research
There has been a long-term, consistent and highly productive engagement between research institutions and funding bodies of the United Kingdom and the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and its predecessors, the International Laboratory for Research on Animal Diseases (ILRAD) and the International Livestock Centre for Africa (ILCA).

In the area of animal health, this ILRI-UK engagement stretches back to the Britain’s support of early-phase basic research on African sleeping sickness, a wasting disease of ruminants, and East Coast fever, a commonly fatal disease of cattle that is similar to malaria and cancer. While vaccine-mediated control of sleeping sickness remains a global challenge, an improved live-parasite-based vaccine made by ILRI is being used to control East Coast fever. ILRI is helping the UK-based Global Alliance for Livestock Veterinary Medicines (GALVmed) to commercialize this product, which was initially developed over 40 years ago at the East African Veterinary Research Organization, the predecessor of the Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (now called the Kenya Agriculture and Livestock Research Organization [KALRO]), which also holds the distinction of being the institute that developed a tissue-culture vaccine that led to eradication of rinderpest.

Slide in presentation by Jimmy smith to UK chief scientific adviser

Slide from a presentation ILRI Director General Jimmy Smith made to UK Chief Scientific Adviser Sir Mark Walport on the latter’s visit to ILRI’s headquarters on 15 Jul 2015.

More recently, a multi-institutional research consortium led by ILRI and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), the Department for International Development (DFID) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)/United States Department of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) has begun working on development of a subunit vaccine to protect Africa’s cattle against East Coast fever. This consortium includes key collaborators from the University of Edinburgh and Oxford and the Royal Veterinary College.

ILRI’s vaccine platform, called ILVAC, also conducts research on other important livestock diseases, such as African swine fever, contagious bovine/caprine pleuropneumonia, peste des petits ruminants and Rift Valley fever. Because these diseases are already endemic in Kenya, ILRI’s animal health research can be carried out in Kenya under bio-containment regulations less stringent than those in the UK. ILRI’s enhanced Biosafety-Level 2 animal facilities have been used to support prototype vaccine trials for peste des petits ruminants and Rift Valley fever in collaboration with scientists at the UK’s Pirbright and Jenner institutes, respectively.

Jimmy Smith gives an overview of ILRI

ILRI director general Jimmy Smith (photo credit: ILRI/Susan MacMillan).

Jimmy Smith, director general of ILRI, welcomed Sir Mark Walport and provided him with an overview of ILRI’s global livestock-research-for-development agenda.

Smith explained that ILRI is one of 15 international agriculture research centres of the CGIAR Consortium and the only centre dedicated entirely to animal agriculture research for the developing world. In addition to its Nairobi headquarters, ILRI has a principal campus in Addis Ababa and regional or country offices offices in 20 other locations in Africa; South, Southeast and East Asia; and Latin America.

‘Drawn from 40 nationalities, ILRI has a work force of about 750 staff globally and operates on an annual budget of almost USD90 million. The institute works through extensive partnership arrangements with research and development institutions in both the developed and developing world.

ILRI’s research-for-development work ranges from laboratory-based biosciences (animal health, genetics and feeds) to field-based integrated sciences in the areas of animal productivity, food safety and zoonotic diseases (transmitted from animals to people), livestock and the environment, gender and livelihoods, and policy and markets. Capacity development is an important part of the institute’s mandate and cuts across all its research and development areas.

‘With the Africa Union/New Partnerships for Africa’s Development (AU/NEPAD), ILRI co-founded the Biosciences eastern and central Africa-ILRI Hub (BecA-ILRI Hub) on its Nairobi campus where world-class facilities for biotechnology research are in use by ILRI, other international as well as national research centres and partners. The platform increases access to world-class laboratories for African and international scientists conducting research on African agricultural challenges.

‘Sharing ILRI’s Nairobi campus are nodes of other CGIAR centres, including the International Potato Center (CIP), the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) and the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT).’


UK chief scientific adviser visits Kenya: Part 1—Legacy of British-ILRI partnerships in animal health research

News from ILRI -

Sir Mark Walport, UK chief science advisor

Sir Mark Walport, the UK chief scientific adviser, listens to ILRI researchers make presentations on international projects to improve livestock and human health in developing countries; Sir Mark visited ILRI’s headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya, and toured its state-of-the-art biosciences laboratories on 15 July 2015 (photo credit: ILRI/Paul Karaimu).

Longstanding ILRI-UK collaborations in animal health research
There has been a long-term, consistent and highly productive engagement between research institutions and funding bodies of the United Kingdom and the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and its predecessors, the International Laboratory for Research on Animal Diseases (ILRAD) and the International Livestock Centre for Africa (ILCA).

In the area of animal health, this ILRI-UK engagement stretches back to the Britain’s support of early-phase basic research on African sleeping sickness, a wasting disease of ruminants, and East Coast fever, a commonly fatal disease of cattle that is similar to malaria and cancer. While vaccine-mediated control of sleeping sickness remains a global challenge, an improved live-parasite-based vaccine made by ILRI is being used to control East Coast fever. ILRI is helping the UK-based Global Alliance for Livestock Veterinary Medicines (GALVmed) to commercialize this product, which was initially developed over 40 years ago at the East African Veterinary Research Organization, the predecessor of the Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (now called the Kenya Agriculture and Livestock Research Organization [KALRO]), which also holds the distinction of being the institute that developed a tissue-culture vaccine that led to eradication of rinderpest.

Slide in presentation by Jimmy smith to UK chief scientific adviser

Slide from a presentation ILRI Director General Jimmy Smith made to UK Chief Scientific Adviser Sir Mark Walport on the latter’s visit to ILRI’s headquarters on 15 Jul 2015.

More recently, a multi-institutional research consortium led by ILRI and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), the Department for International Development (DFID) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)/United States Department of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) has begun working on development of a subunit vaccine to protect Africa’s cattle against East Coast fever. This consortium includes key collaborators from the University of Edinburgh and Oxford and the Royal Veterinary College.

ILRI’s vaccine platform, called ILVAC, also conducts research on other important livestock diseases, such as African swine fever, contagious bovine/caprine pleuropneumonia, peste des petits ruminants and Rift Valley fever. Because these diseases are already endemic in Kenya, ILRI’s animal health research can be carried out in Kenya under bio-containment regulations less stringent than those in the UK. ILRI’s enhanced Biosafety-Level 2 animal facilities have been used to support prototype vaccine trials for peste des petits ruminants and Rift Valley fever in collaboration with scientists at the UK’s Pirbright and Jenner institutes, respectively.

Jimmy Smith gives an overview of ILRI

ILRI director general Jimmy Smith (photo credit: ILRI/Susan MacMillan).

Jimmy Smith, director general of ILRI, welcomed Sir Mark Walport and provided him with an overview of ILRI’s global livestock-research-for-development agenda.

Smith explained that ILRI is one of 15 international agriculture research centres of the CGIAR Consortium and the only centre dedicated entirely to animal agriculture research for the developing world. In addition to its Nairobi headquarters, ILRI has a principal campus in Addis Ababa and regional or country offices offices in 20 other locations in Africa; South, Southeast and East Asia; and Latin America.

‘Drawn from 40 nationalities, ILRI has a work force of about 750 staff globally and operates on an annual budget of almost USD90 million. The institute works through extensive partnership arrangements with research and development institutions in both the developed and developing world.

ILRI’s research-for-development work ranges from laboratory-based biosciences (animal health, genetics and feeds) to field-based integrated sciences in the areas of animal productivity, food safety and zoonotic diseases (transmitted from animals to people), livestock and the environment, gender and livelihoods, and policy and markets. Capacity development is an important part of the institute’s mandate and cuts across all its research and development areas.

‘With the Africa Union/New Partnerships for Africa’s Development (AU/NEPAD), ILRI co-founded the Biosciences eastern and central Africa-ILRI Hub (BecA-ILRI Hub) on its Nairobi campus where world-class facilities for biotechnology research are in use by ILRI, other international as well as national research centres and partners. The platform increases access to world-class laboratories for African and international scientists conducting research on African agricultural challenges.

‘Sharing ILRI’s Nairobi campus are nodes of other CGIAR centres, including the International Potato Center (CIP), the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) and the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT).’


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