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CIP Vacancy: Junior Accountants (2) – (Closing date: 02 May 2015)

Jobs -

The International Potato Center – Ethiopia (CIP) seeks to recruit two Junior Accountants who will be members of CIP for its regional programs in Ethiopia. 

The Center: The International Potato Centre (CIP) is an international non-profit agricultural research organization with a global mandate to conduct research on potatoes, sweet potatoes, Andean root and tuber crops, and sustainable management of natural resources. CIP’s vision is to contribute from its areas of expertise to the fulfillment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), in particular those goals that relate to poverty, hunger, child and maternal mortality, and sustainable development. CIP has its headquarters in Lima, Peru with staff and activities in locations across Africa, Asia and Latin America. CIP is a member of the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research, a network of 15 research centers mostly located in the developing world and supported by more than 60 donor members. 

Key Responsibilities:

  • Under the direct supervision of the Research Associates for the Amhara and Oromia regions, manages all financial matters for the respective office; prepares payments in accordance with the procedures of USAID, Irish Aid ILRI and CIP rules and in accordance with the approved budgets:
  • Prepares requests to the CIP Addis Ababa Office for the replenishment of funds for the office;
  • Manages the petty cash float and ensures correct documentation of all transactions;
  • Ensures that all payments are authorized by the Research Associates; codes the expenditure in accordance with the budget allocated to the office;
  • Is responsible for timely payment of travel claims, utilities, material purchase, office supplies and transport for sub grantees. Ensures that all financial and contractual documentation is legal and in accordance with the donor rules;
  • Compiles monthly financial return to the CIP Addis Ababa Office at the end of every month which includes the monthly cash/Bank account balance. In close coordination with CIP Addis Ababa, contributes to the preparation of financial reports and other reports as required;
  • Responds to queries from internal units or staff members.

Logistics and Administration;

  • In coordination with the Office and Finance Manager in Addis Ababa, receives requests for services from sub grantees internal clients, promptly prepares the required paperwork for their processing by either internal units or governmental departments;
  • Facilitates the procurement of goods and services from local suppliers and ensures that relevant procurement guidelines and mandatory documentation are adhered to;
  • Ensures that the contracts for office and other services are renewed on time;
  • Monitors vehicle movement and submits vehicle reports with copies of the vehicle log book to the CIP Addis Ababa Office at the end of every moth along with the financial return;
  • Performs any other task as required.

Skills and Competencies:

  • Integrity and capacity to keep information confidentially;
  • Good skills in MS Excel;
  • Good computer skills;
  • Ability to organize assigned duties and respect deadlines;
  • Ability to organize one’s paperwork and archives efficiently;
  • Ability to establish and maintain good relations with a wide array of personalities both within and outside the organization.
  • For the Oromia position – excellent Oromiffa language skill (oral and written);

Education:

  • Diploma or BA degree in Accounting/Finance or in related field.

Experience:

  • At least 2 years of relevant work experience,
  • Good understanding of budgeting and financial management procedures with good knowledge of accounting software – use of Agresso Business World is desirable.

Duty Station: Amhara Region – will be based at Bahir Dar.

Oromia Region – will be based at Addis Ababa.

Grade: 2A

Minimum Base: Birr 9,326 (Negotiable, depending on experience, skill and salary history of the candidate).

Terms of appointment: This is Nationally Recruited Staff (NRS) positions, initial appointment is fixed term for one year with the possibility of renewal, contingent upon individual performance and the availability of funding. The ILRI remuneration package for nationally recruited staff in Ethiopia includes very competitive salary and benefits such as life and medical insurance, offshore pension plan, etc. The ILRI campus is set in a secure, attractive campus in Addis Ababa. Dining and sports facilities are located on site.

Applications: Applicants should provide a cover letter and curriculum vitae; names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience to be included in the curriculum vitae. The position, duty station and reference number for the position should be clearly indicated in the subject line of the cover letter. All applications to be submitted online on our recruitment portal: http://ilri.simplicant.com/ on or before 02 May 2015.

To find more about CIP, visit our Website at www.cip.cgiar.org.

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/

Suitably qualified women are particularly encouraged to apply.

More ILRI jobs

Subscribe by email to ILRI jobs alert


CIP Vacancy: Filing Clerks (2) – (Closing date: 02 May 2015)

Jobs -

The International Potato Center – Ethiopia (CIP) seeks to recruit two Filing Clerks who will be members of CIP for its regional programs in Ethiopia.

The Center: The International Potato Centre (CIP) is an international non-profit agricultural research organization with a global mandate to conduct research on potatoes, sweet potatoes, Andean root and tuber crops, and sustainable management of natural resources. CIP’s vision is to contribute from its areas of expertise to the fulfillment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), in particular those goals that relate to poverty, hunger, child and maternal mortality, and sustainable development. CIP has its headquarters in Lima, Peru with staff and activities in locations across Africa, Asia and Latin America. CIP is a member of the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research, a network of 15 research centers mostly located in the developing world and supported by more than 60 donor members.

Key Responsibilities:

  • Assists in managing financial matters and for partner offices and financial review and follow up;
  • Assists in checking documentation of transactions, authorization of payments, in compiling monthly financial report;
  • Assists in timely payment of travel claims, utilities, material purchases, office supplies and transport for sub grantees;
  • Assist timesheet and vehicle performance report
    Scanning and document photocopy and preparation for settlement;
  • To deliver to sign documents ,purchase request, Bid analysis and financial document of partners with PI and Authorized person;
  • Assists the junior accountant in organizing workshops;
  • Performs any other task as required.

Skills and Competencies:

  • Integrity and capacity to keep information confidentially;
  • Good skills in MS Excel;
  • Good computer skills;
  • Ability to organize assigned duties and respect deadlines;
  • Ability to organize one’s paperwork and archives efficiently;
  • Ability to establish and maintain good relations with a wide array of personalities both within and outside the organization.
  • Communication skill in English language,
  • Good organization skills,
  • For the Tigray position – excellent Tigregna language skill (oral and written).

Education:

  • High school completed plus certificate in Bookkeeping / Accounting from Technical & Vocational school

Experience:  

  • At least 2 years relevant work experience.

Duty Station: Tigray Region – will be based at Mekele.

SNNP Region – will be based at Hawassa.

Grade:  1B.

Minimum Base: Birr 5,596 (Negotiable, depending on experience, skill and salary history of the candidate).

Terms of appointment: This is a Nationally Recruited Staff (NRS) positions, initial appointment is fixed term for one year with the possibility of renewal, contingent upon individual performance and the availability of funding. The ILRI remuneration package for nationally recruited staff in Ethiopia includes very competitive salary and benefits such as life and medical insurance, offshore pension plan, etc. The ILRI campus is set in a secure, attractive campus in Addis Ababa. Dining and sports facilities are located on site. 

Applications: Applicants should provide a cover letter and curriculum vitae; names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience to be included in the curriculum vitae. The position, duty station and reference number for the position should be clearly indicated in the subject line of the cover letter. All applications to be submitted online on our recruitment portal: http://ilri.simplicant.com/ on or before 02 May 2015.

To find more about CIP, visit our Website at www.cip.cgiar.org.

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/             

Suitably qualified women are particularly encouraged to apply.

More ILRI jobs

Subscribe by email to ILRI jobs alert


CIP Vacancy: Accountant – Partnership – (Closing date: 02 May 2015)

Jobs -

The International Potato Center – Ethiopia (CIP) seeks to recruit Accountant-Partnership who will be a member of CIP at its office in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

The Center: The International Potato Centre (CIP) is an international non-profit agricultural research organization with a global mandate to conduct research on potatoes, sweet potatoes, Andean root and tuber crops, and sustainable management of natural resources. CIP’s vision is to contribute from its areas of expertise to the fulfillment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), in particular those goals that relate to poverty, hunger, child and maternal mortality, and sustainable development. CIP has its headquarters in Lima, Peru with staff and activities in locations across Africa, Asia and Latin America. CIP is a member of the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research, a network of 15 research centers mostly located in the developing world and supported by more than 60 donor members.

Key Responsibilities:

  • Maintains and updates a data base of all partners/sub grantees by Donor which includes the allocation and periodic reporting deadlines normally 10 days after the end of each quarter;
  • Follows up with partners on timely submission of periodic financial reports and communicates to the Office and Finance Manager on issues requiring attention;
  • Receives financial liquidation and validates documents, ensuring that the expenses reported are approved in partnership the agreements, they comply with the respective donor/ILRI/CIP and partner rules and regulations;
  • Ensures that documents are legal and complete, validates the financial detailed and summary reports, correctness of opening balances, expenditure for the period and the ending balances;
  • Validates the budget versus actual expenditure report and correctness of exchange rates use.
  • Reconciles the transactions in OCS with the partner reports;
  • Maintains an up-to-date record of all in kind contribution for each partner on a monthly basis;
  • In close coordination with CIP Addis Ababa, contributes to the preparation of financial reports and other reports as required;
  • Responds to queries from internal units or staff members, assists in clearing queries for Audits.

Asset Control

  • In coordination with the Admin Assistant and Junior Accountants with the Regions, Coordinates semi- annual inventory of assets;
  • For the Addis office in coordination with the Admin Assistant conducts checking of stock movements and ensures that the stock/ bin cards are up to date and in agreement with the physical inventory;
  • Ensures that all assets are tagged and are recorded in the fixed assets registers on a monthly basis. Reconciles the register with the procurement documents in the office. Reports any discrepancies to the Office and Finance Manager;
  • Performs any other duties as assigned by the Country programme Manager and Office and Finance Manager.

Skills and Competencies:

  • Demonstrated integrity and capacity to keep confidential information
  • Strong analytical skills
  • Very organized and methodical
  • Self-starter, initiative and sound problem-solving capacity
  • Ability to present data and financial reports
  • Good planning and organizational skills
  • Demonstrated constant attention to detail
  • Demonstrated capacity to question one’s work, seek continual improvement in the services, systems or one’s knowledge
  • Flexible and enjoys challenges
  • Superior problem solving skill
  • Experience with a computerized financial systems
  • Interest for agricultural research for development or development work
  • Must be an IT literate in use of Microsoft packages and conversant with ERP application software such as Agresso Business World used for financial management and integration systems.

Education:

  • Bachelor’s degree in Accounting, Finance or Business Administration from a recognized university or college. Completion of ACCA or equivalent is a plus.

Experience:

  • At least 5 years relevant work experience post qualification in part of an International NGO or an International organization.

Duty Station: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Grade: 2C 

Minimum Base: Birr 14,839 (Negotiable, depending on experience, skill and salary history of the candidate)

Terms of appointment: This is Nationally Recruited Staff (NRS) positions, initial appointment is fixed term for one year with the possibility of renewal, contingent upon individual performance and the availability of funding. The ILRI remuneration package for nationally recruited staff in Ethiopia includes very competitive salary and benefits such as life and medical insurance, offshore pension plan, etc. The ILRI campus is set in a secure, attractive campus in Addis Ababa. Dining and sports facilities are located on site.

Applications: Applicants should provide a cover letter and curriculum vitae; names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience to be included in the curriculum vitae. The position, duty station and reference number for the position should be clearly indicated in the subject line of the cover letter. All applications to be submitted online on our recruitment portal: http://ilri.simplicant.com/ on or before 02 May 2015.

To find more about CIP, visit our Website at www.cip.cgiar.org.

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/            

Suitably qualified women are particularly encouraged to apply.

More ILRI jobs

Subscribe by email to ILRI jobs alert


Parasites to the rescue: Study suggests dual infections may help control livestock and human infectious diseases

East Africa Clippings -

Mann07Ilri3633_RT8

In Ethiopia’s Ghibe valley, an ILRI control herd waits for monthly parasitology tests (photo credit: ILRI/Stevie Mann).

‘Herds of African cattle may hold the secret to new ways of fighting parasitic diseases like malaria, which kills some 600,000 people a year, scientists said on Friday.

‘The researchers from the University of Edinburgh found that cows are protected from a parasite that causes a deadly disease called East Coast [f]ever if they have previously been infected with a closely-related but milder species of the parasite.

‘This discovery, they said, suggests that “fighting fire with fire” is a strategy that might work against a range of parasitic diseases, including severe malarial infection in people.

‘”Our results suggest seeking a simple vaccine that could protect cows from East Coast fever by inoculating them with a related but far less harmful parasite,” said Mark Woolhouse, who led the study with a team from several other universities and the International Livestock Research Institute.

‘”A similar process might be at work in malaria, where infection with the less harmful Plasmodium vivax parasite may protect people from the Plasmodium falciparum parasite.”. . .

For their study, Woolhouse’s team tracked the health of 500 Kenyan calves from birth to one year old, building up data on the cattle’s survival, growth, health and infections with viruses, bacteria, worms and tick-borne parasites. They found that deaths caused by East Coast [f]ever, the biggest killer of East African cattle, dropped 89 per cent among calves which were also infected with other species of parasite that do not cause disease.

‘Something similar may occur when people are infected with the more deadly parasite P. falciparum at the same time as the less aggressive P. vivax, making them more likely to survive the disease. . . .’

Read the whole article by Kate Kelland in Drivers Cattle Network: Cattle parasite study points to possible way to fight malaria, 20 Apr 2015.

Read the paper in Science Advances: Co-infections determine patterns of mortality in a population exposed to parasite infection, 20 Mar 2015.

Abstract
Many individual hosts are infected with multiple parasite species, and this may increase or decrease the pathogenicity of the infections. This phenomenon is termed heterologous reactivity and is potentially an important determinant of both patterns of morbidity and mortality and of the impact of disease control measures at the population level. Using infections with Theileria parva (a tick-borne protozoan, related to Plasmodium) in indigenous African cattle [where it causes East Coast fever (ECF)] as a model system, we obtain the first quantitative estimate of the effects of heterologous reactivity for any parasitic disease. In individual calves, concurrent co-infection with less pathogenic species of Theileria resulted in an 89% reduction in mortality associated with T. parva infection. Across our study population, this corresponds to a net reduction in mortality due to ECF of greater than 40%. Using a mathematical model, we demonstrate that this degree of heterologous protection provides a unifying explanation for apparently disparate epidemiological patterns: variable disease-induced mortality rates, age-mortality profiles, weak correlations between the incidence of infection and disease (known as endemic stability), and poor efficacy of interventions that reduce exposure to multiple parasite species. These findings can be generalized to many other infectious diseases, including human malaria, and illustrate how co-infections can play a key role in determining population-level patterns of morbidity and mortality due to parasite infections.

Acknowledgements
Researchers from the Universities of Edinburgh, Glasgow, Pretoria and Nottingham, the Roslin Institute and the ILRI contributed to the study, which was funded by the Wellcome Trust.

Read ILRI’s news release on this paper
Fighting fire with fire: New study shows co-parasitic infections of cattle protect the animals from lethal disease, 21 Mar 2015

Read other news clippings on this paper
When two parasites are better than one: (Unusual) insights into ways to combat human parasitic diseases, 30 Mar 2015
New paper on parasitic infections shows the benefits of co-infections with the ‘mild cousins’ of important pathogens, 21 Mar 2015
ILRI’s Philip Toye VOA interview on East Coast fever, and the benefits of co-parasitic infections, 21 Mar 2015


Filed under: ABS, Agri-Health, Article, Cattle, Central Africa, CRP37, Disease Control, East Africa, Epidemiology, Health (human), ILRI, Kenya, Southern Africa Tagged: IDEAL project, Malaria, Mark Woolhouse, Phil Toye, Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, University of Glasgow, University of Nottingham, University of Pretoria, Wellcome Trust

Parasites to the resuce: Study suggests dual infections may help control livestock and human infectious diseases

CRP 3.7 Clippings -

Mann07Ilri3633_RT8

In Ethiopia’s Ghibe valley, an ILRI control herd waits for monthly parasitology tests (photo credit: ILRI/Stevie Mann).

‘Herds of African cattle may hold the secret to new ways of fighting parasitic diseases like malaria, which kills some 600,000 people a year, scientists said on Friday.

‘The researchers from the University of Edinburgh found that cows are protected from a parasite that causes a deadly disease called East Coast [f]ever if they have previously been infected with a closely-related but milder species of the parasite.

‘This discovery, they said, suggests that “fighting fire with fire” is a strategy that might work against a range of parasitic diseases, including severe malarial infection in people.

‘”Our results suggest seeking a simple vaccine that could protect cows from East Coast fever by inoculating them with a related but far less harmful parasite,” said Mark Woolhouse, who led the study with a team from several other universities and the International Livestock Research Institute.

‘”A similar process might be at work in malaria, where infection with the less harmful Plasmodium vivax parasite may protect people from the Plasmodium falciparum parasite.”. . .

For their study, Woolhouse’s team tracked the health of 500 Kenyan calves from birth to one year old, building up data on the cattle’s survival, growth, health and infections with viruses, bacteria, worms and tick-borne parasites. They found that deaths caused by East Coast [f]ever, the biggest killer of East African cattle, dropped 89 per cent among calves which were also infected with other species of parasite that do not cause disease.

‘Something similar may occur when people are infected with the more deadly parasite P. falciparum at the same time as the less aggressive P. vivax, making them more likely to survive the disease. . . .’

Read the whole article by Kate Kelland in Drivers Cattle Network: Cattle parasite study points to possible way to fight malaria, 20 Apr 2015.

Read the paper in Science Advances: Co-infections determine patterns of mortality in a population exposed to parasite infection, 20 Mar 2015.

Abstract
Many individual hosts are infected with multiple parasite species, and this may increase or decrease the pathogenicity of the infections. This phenomenon is termed heterologous reactivity and is potentially an important determinant of both patterns of morbidity and mortality and of the impact of disease control measures at the population level. Using infections with Theileria parva (a tick-borne protozoan, related to Plasmodium) in indigenous African cattle [where it causes East Coast fever (ECF)] as a model system, we obtain the first quantitative estimate of the effects of heterologous reactivity for any parasitic disease. In individual calves, concurrent co-infection with less pathogenic species of Theileria resulted in an 89% reduction in mortality associated with T. parva infection. Across our study population, this corresponds to a net reduction in mortality due to ECF of greater than 40%. Using a mathematical model, we demonstrate that this degree of heterologous protection provides a unifying explanation for apparently disparate epidemiological patterns: variable disease-induced mortality rates, age-mortality profiles, weak correlations between the incidence of infection and disease (known as endemic stability), and poor efficacy of interventions that reduce exposure to multiple parasite species. These findings can be generalized to many other infectious diseases, including human malaria, and illustrate how co-infections can play a key role in determining population-level patterns of morbidity and mortality due to parasite infections.

Acknowledgements
Researchers from the Universities of Edinburgh, Glasgow, Pretoria and Nottingham, the Roslin Institute and the ILRI contributed to the study, which was funded by the Wellcome Trust.

Read ILRI’s news release on this paper
Fighting fire with fire: New study shows co-parasitic infections of cattle protect the animals from lethal disease, 21 Mar 2015

Read other news clippings on this paper
When two parasites are better than one: (Unusual) insights into ways to combat human parasitic diseases, 30 Mar 2015
New paper on parasitic infections shows the benefits of co-infections with the ‘mild cousins’ of important pathogens, 21 Mar 2015
ILRI’s Philip Toye VOA interview on East Coast fever, and the benefits of co-parasitic infections, 21 Mar 2015


Filed under: ABS, Agri-Health, Article, Cattle, Central Africa, CRP37, Disease Control, East Africa, Epidemiology, Health (human), ILRI, Kenya, Southern Africa Tagged: IDEAL project, Malaria, Mark Woolhouse, Phil Toye, Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, University of Glasgow, University of Nottingham, University of Pretoria, Wellcome Trust

Parasites to the resuce: Study suggests dual infections may help control livestock and human infectious diseases

Clippings -

Mann07Ilri3633_RT8

In Ethiopia’s Ghibe valley, an ILRI control herd waits for monthly parasitology tests (photo credit: ILRI/Stevie Mann).

‘Herds of African cattle may hold the secret to new ways of fighting parasitic diseases like malaria, which kills some 600,000 people a year, scientists said on Friday.

‘The researchers from the University of Edinburgh found that cows are protected from a parasite that causes a deadly disease called East Coast [f]ever if they have previously been infected with a closely-related but milder species of the parasite.

‘This discovery, they said, suggests that “fighting fire with fire” is a strategy that might work against a range of parasitic diseases, including severe malarial infection in people.

‘”Our results suggest seeking a simple vaccine that could protect cows from East Coast fever by inoculating them with a related but far less harmful parasite,” said Mark Woolhouse, who led the study with a team from several other universities and the International Livestock Research Institute.

‘”A similar process might be at work in malaria, where infection with the less harmful Plasmodium vivax parasite may protect people from the Plasmodium falciparum parasite.”. . .

For their study, Woolhouse’s team tracked the health of 500 Kenyan calves from birth to one year old, building up data on the cattle’s survival, growth, health and infections with viruses, bacteria, worms and tick-borne parasites. They found that deaths caused by East Coast [f]ever, the biggest killer of East African cattle, dropped 89 per cent among calves which were also infected with other species of parasite that do not cause disease.

‘Something similar may occur when people are infected with the more deadly parasite P. falciparum at the same time as the less aggressive P. vivax, making them more likely to survive the disease. . . .’

Read the whole article by Kate Kelland in Drivers Cattle Network: Cattle parasite study points to possible way to fight malaria, 20 Apr 2015.

Read the paper in Science Advances: Co-infections determine patterns of mortality in a population exposed to parasite infection, 20 Mar 2015.

Abstract
Many individual hosts are infected with multiple parasite species, and this may increase or decrease the pathogenicity of the infections. This phenomenon is termed heterologous reactivity and is potentially an important determinant of both patterns of morbidity and mortality and of the impact of disease control measures at the population level. Using infections with Theileria parva (a tick-borne protozoan, related to Plasmodium) in indigenous African cattle [where it causes East Coast fever (ECF)] as a model system, we obtain the first quantitative estimate of the effects of heterologous reactivity for any parasitic disease. In individual calves, concurrent co-infection with less pathogenic species of Theileria resulted in an 89% reduction in mortality associated with T. parva infection. Across our study population, this corresponds to a net reduction in mortality due to ECF of greater than 40%. Using a mathematical model, we demonstrate that this degree of heterologous protection provides a unifying explanation for apparently disparate epidemiological patterns: variable disease-induced mortality rates, age-mortality profiles, weak correlations between the incidence of infection and disease (known as endemic stability), and poor efficacy of interventions that reduce exposure to multiple parasite species. These findings can be generalized to many other infectious diseases, including human malaria, and illustrate how co-infections can play a key role in determining population-level patterns of morbidity and mortality due to parasite infections.

Acknowledgements
Researchers from the Universities of Edinburgh, Glasgow, Pretoria and Nottingham, the Roslin Institute and the ILRI contributed to the study, which was funded by the Wellcome Trust.

Read ILRI’s news release on this paper
Fighting fire with fire: New study shows co-parasitic infections of cattle protect the animals from lethal disease, 21 Mar 2015

Read other news clippings on this paper
When two parasites are better than one: (Unusual) insights into ways to combat human parasitic diseases, 30 Mar 2015
New paper on parasitic infections shows the benefits of co-infections with the ‘mild cousins’ of important pathogens, 21 Mar 2015
ILRI’s Philip Toye VOA interview on East Coast fever, and the benefits of co-parasitic infections, 21 Mar 2015


Filed under: ABS, Agri-Health, Article, Cattle, Central Africa, CRP37, Disease Control, East Africa, Epidemiology, Health (human), ILRI, Kenya, Southern Africa Tagged: IDEAL project, Malaria, Mark Woolhouse, Phil Toye, Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, University of Glasgow, University of Nottingham, University of Pretoria, Wellcome Trust

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