Feed aggregator

Webinar: Collecting sex-disaggregated agricultural data through surveys

CRP 2: program news -

PIM Gender team including Cheryl Doss and Caitlin Kieran invite participants to discuss how the Standards for collecting sex-disaggregated data for gender analysis drafted by PIM in 2014 have been used to date, with a specific focus on lessons learned by CGIAR centers and external partners. 

When: Thursday, April 21, 2016, 1pm-2:30pm EST

 

Given the increased attention to gender research, both within CGIAR and among external partners and donors, researchers are expected or even required to conduct gender analysis, which necessitates collecting relevant data. Standards for collecting sex-disaggregated data for gender analysis drafted by the CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM) in 2014, with contributions from the CGIAR Gender and Agriculture Research Network and the IFPRI Gender Task Force, identify simple and achievable steps for gathering such data. These guidelines raise issues that researchers should consider throughout the research process such as who should provide information, the unit of analysis, and the research context.

About this webinar series

“On gender and agriculture” webinar series has been designed as a knowledge sharing tool to facilitate exchange amongst the members of the CGIAR Gender and Agriculture Research Network. See the previous webinar’s page.

This webinar is based on the research conducted by the CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM) led by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Participants are invited to discuss how the Standards for collecting sex-disaggregated data for gender analysis have been used to date, with a specific focus on lessons learned by CGIAR Centers and external partners.

Register to participate

Webinar structure

Speakers will provide definitions related to sex-disaggregated data and gender analysis, give an overview of the role of gender in five broad research areas commonly addressed within CGIAR, and discuss the key issues to address when collecting and analyzing sex-disaggregated data.

The webinar will include presentations by two speakers followed by a Q&A session.

Participants are encouraged to share their responses to the following questions:

    • Have you been using the guidelines? What insights can you share from trying to implement them? What challenges have you faced?
    • What have you learned from collecting sex-disaggregated data that you would not have learned with just household-level data?
    • How would you use this information to report on CGIAR’s cross-cutting IDO on equity and inclusion achieved and the related sub-IDOs including (1) gender equitable control of productive assets and resources, (2) technologies that reduce women’s labor and energy expenditure developed and disseminated, and (3) improved capacity of women and young people to participate in decision making?
    • How do we make sure we’re collecting data that allow us to do some comparisons across projects (and answer some larger research questions) without losing the context specificity?

Related reading

Standards for Collecting Sex-Disaggregated Data for Gender Analysis

Promoting Gender Equitable Opportunities: Why It Matters for Agricultural Value Chains

A Toolkit on Collecting Gender & Assets Data in Qualitative and Quantitative Program Evaluations

Practical Tips for Conducting Gender-Responsive Data Collection

Research Guide for Gender-Disaggregated Analysis of Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation

Integrating Gender into Forestry Research: A Guide for CIFOR Scientists and Programme Administrators

Gender, Nutrition - and Climate-Smart Food Production: Opportunities and Trade-Offs

Gender Analysis in Macroeconomic and Agricultural Sector Policies and Programmes

The Gender Asset Gap Project: Collecting Sex-Disaggregated Asset Data

Gender and Land Statistics: recent development in FAO’s gender and land rights database

Speakers 

Cheryl DossCheryl Doss is a development economist whose research focuses on issues related to agriculture, assets, and gender, with a regional focus on Africa south of the Sahara.  As a Senior Lecturer at Yale University, she has taught widely at the graduate and undergraduate levels including courses on research methods, the economics of Africa, and agricultural development and food security. Among her research projects, she co-leads the Gender Asset Gap Project, a large-scale effort to collect data and measure individual asset and wealth holdings for men and women in Ecuador, Ghana, and Karnataka, India. She works with a range of international organizations on issues including gender and agriculture, intra-household resource allocation, and women’s asset ownership. Currently, she is the gender advisor to the CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM), led by IFPRI. Recently, she has also worked with UN Women, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, the World Bank, DFID, the Africa Development Bank, and the UN Foundation on issues of women’s asset ownership.

Caitlin-Kieran_photo-sqCaitlin Kieran is the Senior Research Assistant for PIM, where she monitors and supports the incorporation of gender analysis within PIM’s research portfolio and researches issues related to gender, agriculture, assets, intrahousehold dynamics, and survey methodology. She has conducted fieldwork on development programs in Ethiopia, Benin, and Senegal and worked with women entrepreneurs in Ecuador. Caitlin received her Master’s in Public Administration from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, where she studied Economic and Political Development and received a certificate in Gender Policy. She received her Bachelor’s degree from Yale University.

 

Featured image (top): Neil Palmer (CIAT), Flickr.

ILRI Kenya – Mercedes Benz C-class for sale

Latest ILRI announcements -

  • Mercedes Benz C-class Estate, Black
  • Msamuelanufacture date: 2009
  • Imported into Kenya from UK in March 2016
  • Fuel: Diesel
  • Engine: 2.1 L
  • Gear-box: 6-speed manual,  Plus automatic Cruise control
  • All new Michelin tyres

Other features: Fully loaded with all modern Merc instruments.
Asking price: US$20,000 duty free. Available immediately.

Contact:
Samuel O. Oyola, PhD | Molecular Biologist-Genomics, for viewing, test drive and more information: 0724567002/EXT 3451/ S.Oyola@cgiar.org

2016 Science Forum: Rethinking agricultural pathways to inclusive development

Spotlight from ILRI news -

Fankenthaler_GardenInTheSky_1973

This painting, ‘Garden in the Sky’, 1973, is by Helen Frankenthaler (1950–2011), an American abstract expressionist, as are all the other paintings on this page (via Wikiart).

Next week (12–14 Apr 2016), the Independent Science and Partnership Council (ISPC), a standing panel of leading scientific experts working to strengthen the quality, relevance and impact of CGIAR science for development, holds its annual Science Forum in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

In the lead up to the 2016 Science Forum, the topic of which is ‘Agricultural research for rural prosperity: Rethinking the pathways’, steering committee members and invited speakers answered a few questions related to the Forum’s focus on agricultural research pathways to inclusive rural development. Below are excerpts of their responses. You’ll find all the responses on the SF2016 blog site.

The objective of the 2016 Science Forum is to rethink the pathways for agricultural research to stimulate inclusive development of rural economies in an era of climate change. The Forum will . . . suggest an updated list of priority research areas and approaches which involve more strategic and inclusive engagement with partners.

Frankenthaler_OrangeDownpour_1963

‘Orange Downpour’, 1963.

Baba Yusuf Abubakar, executive secretary of the Agricultural Research Council of Nigeria
The ARC is an umbrella organization of 15 research institutes and 11 agricultural colleges comprising some 12,000 staff. Abubakar is a member of the CGIAR Fund Council and a Cornell graduate in animal breeding and genetics.

One of the essential elements for delivery of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is prosperity; that is to grow a strong inclusive & transformative economy. We know that achieving this goal is very complex . . . .

In developing countries, we must . . .  renew efforts at improving agricultural systems for inclusive growth through increase in productivity of agriculture, livestock and fisheries, better rural infrastructure, innovative farming practices and more effective natural resource management.

We need, as a game changer, increased investment in R4D. . . . [A] cross-sectoral approach is key through the involvement of farmers and all stakeholders along the value chain of actors.

The challenge is to produce more and better food with fewer resources through technological innovation.

Frankenthaler_ALittleZen_1970

‘A Little Zen’, 1970.

Ruth Meinzen-Dick, senior research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
Meinzen-Dick has coordinated the CGIAR Program on Collective Action and Property Rights (CAPRi), which works with all CGIAR centres, since 1996.

I was glad to see the emphasis on inclusive development and am concerned that focusing on ‘prosperity’ should not take attention away from the need to pay attention to the poor and marginalized.

Creating prosperity for some is relatively easy; inclusive development is harder, but more meaningful.

An important way to achieve that is to strengthen assets, especially rights to resources for those who depend on those resources, including not only farmers but also pastoralists, fishers, forest communities, and women within those communities in particular. Assets are especially important because they create the basis for sustainable improvements in not only productivity but also welfare.

Frankenthaler_WhatRedLinesCanDo_1970

‘What Red Lines Can Do’, 1970.

Rajul Pandya-Lorch, head of 2020 Vision and chief of staff at the International Food Policy Research Institute
With her colleague David Spielman, Pandya-Lorch led a project on ‘Millions Fed: Proven Successes in Agricultural Development’, which identified and examined major successes in agricultural development and drew out the lessons they offered to substantially reduce hunger.

Greater rural prosperity looks like better fed, well-nourished people with decent, remunerative jobs who are able to withstand and bounce back from shocks.

To achieve greater rural prosperity, we must continue to invest in agriculture but also move beyond this focus to include investments in better nutrition and health, in social protection, in management of natural resources, in other words, in resilience.

Millions Fed examined pathways to success in six different areas: intensifying staple food production; integrating people and the environment; expanding the role of markets; diversifying out of major cereals; reforming economy-wide policies; and improving food quality and human nutrition.

Frankenthaler_LivingEdge_1973

‘Living Edge’, 1973.

S Mahendra Dev, director and vice chancellor of the Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research
Dev has written or edited 12 books, including the recently published Inclusive Growth in India: Agriculture, Poverty, and Human Development, and is a board member of the International Food Policy Research Institute.

Within agriculture, we should move towards non-cereals like pulses, oilseeds, fruits and vegetables and to allied activities like livestock, poultry and fisheries.

Studies show that countries lose 2 to 3% of GDP due to malnutrition. Similarly one dollar investment in improving child and maternal nutrition can give returns of $20 to $30.

The rural non-farm sector should be developed because agricultural incomes are not sufficient to reduce poverty in rural areas. . . . Sometimes the solution for agriculture may lie in non-agriculture.

The green revolution helped Asian agriculture in the 1960s and 1970s. We should extend the green revolution to African agriculture. But, we should go beyond the green revolution and have climate-resilient agriculture.

Frankenthaler_AGreenThoughtInAGreenShade_1981

‘A Green Thought in a Green Shade’, 1981.

George Bigirwa, head of the regional team for East and Southern Africa at the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa
Bigirwa worked for Uganda’s national research system for 23 years, contributing to the development and release of maize and rice varieties now popularly grown in Uganda and neighbouring countries.

[Agriculture] is a major engine for overall economic growth and possibly the single most important pathway out of poverty in the rural space.

In Africa, almost 75% of the population is engaged in agriculture and if one is to uplift their standard of living, the interventions have to be through agriculture.

Gone are the days when researchers would design interventions on their own and hand them over to end-users to implement or adopt.

Frankenthaler_SouthernExposure_2005

‘Southern Exposure’, 2005.

Peter Carberry, deputy director general for research at the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics
Before his recent CGIAR appointment, Carberry served as chief research scientist in Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation.

Farmers produce, consume and sell commodities; the currency of markets are commodities; the pathways for agricultural development are largely built on commodity value chains and markets. Hence, rural prosperity looks like farmers producing, consuming and, critically, benefiting from selling their cereal, legume, livestock, cash crop and wood commodities into functional and developing value chains and markets.

The impressive performance of Australian dryland agriculture has been achieved through innovation, based on research leading to technology development and adoption. . . . Australia shares the same climate, soils and agro-ecology as much of the developing world where agricultural livelihoods need to improve.

Australian farming is unsubsidized, conducted on fragile soils and in one of the most variable climates in the world.

Frankenthaler_WeatherChange_1963

‘Weather Change’, 1963.

Fentahun Mengistu, director general of the Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research
Mengistu previously served as director of Ethiopia’s Agricultural Research Stations and director general of Amhara State Agricultural Research Institute.

[M]odern biosciences can help achieve higher yields with fewer resources and less impact on human and environmental health.

[M]ethodologies of today [will] be insufficient for the future. With the new speed of change and diversified portfolio of small-scale farmers, targeting a single problem will be inadequate.

Future research [will] need to address multiple challenges at a time. Therefore systems research is increasingly needed with the collective action of many disciplines and institutions at various fronts.

Frankenthaler_WindDirections_1970

‘Wind Directions’, 1970.

Kei Otsuka, professor at Kobe University and Tokyo’s National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies
Otsuka serves on the Global Rice Science Partnership oversight committee and has published books on the Asian and African green revolutions.

I believe that we should support Green Revolution in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly for maize and rice. In addition to ‘seed-fertilizer technology’, ‘improved management practices’ are important. But the latter aspect has been largely neglected in CGIAR research.

For rice, transferability of Asian technology is high, so that what is important is to strengthen extension. For maize, farming system research, which seeks the best combination of manure and chemical fertilizer application, intercropping between maize and legumes, hybrid seeds, the use of improved cows, and production of feed crops, needs to be done.

More collaboration between CIMMYT and ILRI is clearly needed.

Frankenthaler_Harbinger_1986

‘Harbinger’, 1986.

Tom Tomich, founding director of the Agricultural Sustainability Institute and inaugural holder of the WK Kellogg Endowed Chair in Sustainable Food Systems at the University of California at Davis
Tomich directs the UC statewide Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program and serves on a number of committees and boards, including the CGIAR Independent Science and Partnership Council.

No country—putting aside city states—has achieved prosperity without growth in productivity in multiple sectors (agriculture, industry, services) and in fact for many countries this growth process has been mutually reinforcing. So while agricultural productivity does play a central role, agriculture cannot do the job alone. Equally important regarding prosperity, which includes elimination of the interrelated scourges of mass poverty and chronic hunger, history also indicates that equity of distribution of these gains is essential.

Since at least the 1990s—and certainly now with manifestations of impacts of climate change already apparent, it is clear we cannot think of the path to prosperity as assured—the sustainability and resilience of the food system (and our economies and societies more generally) must also be considered. Vulnerability of the food system to climate change is one of several interacting sources of uncertainty that means we also need to consider the wellbeing of people together with health of ecosystems.

To me, the big realization of the transition from the late 20th into the early 21st century has been that human activities are the primary driver of change (for better or worse) in the Earth’s life support systems, including our food systems, and we need to take seriously the strategically important system feedbacks (epitomized by climate change, but also by a nexus like climate x energy x water) as the foundations of sustainable prosperity in the 21st Century.

Frankenthaler_SunshineAfterRain_1987

‘Sunshine after Rain’, 1987.

More information
Read the full interviews of these experts, all of whom will speak at the Science Forum next week, on the Science Forum 2016 blog.


2016 Science Forum: Rethinking agricultural pathways to inclusive development

News from ILRI -

Fankenthaler_GardenInTheSky_1973

This painting, ‘Garden in the Sky’, 1973, is by Helen Frankenthaler (1950–2011), an American abstract expressionist, as are all the other paintings on this page (via Wikiart).

Next week (12–14 Apr 2016), the Independent Science and Partnership Council (ISPC), a standing panel of leading scientific experts working to strengthen the quality, relevance and impact of CGIAR science for development, holds its annual Science Forum in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

In the lead up to the 2016 Science Forum, the topic of which is ‘Agricultural research for rural prosperity: Rethinking the pathways’, steering committee members and invited speakers answered a few questions related to the Forum’s focus on agricultural research pathways to inclusive rural development. Below are excerpts of their responses. You’ll find all the responses on the SF2016 blog site.

The objective of the 2016 Science Forum is to rethink the pathways for agricultural research to stimulate inclusive development of rural economies in an era of climate change. The Forum will . . . suggest an updated list of priority research areas and approaches which involve more strategic and inclusive engagement with partners.

Frankenthaler_OrangeDownpour_1963

‘Orange Downpour’, 1963.

Baba Yusuf Abubakar, executive secretary of the Agricultural Research Council of Nigeria
The ARC is an umbrella organization of 15 research institutes and 11 agricultural colleges comprising some 12,000 staff. Abubakar is a member of the CGIAR Fund Council and a Cornell graduate in animal breeding and genetics.

One of the essential elements for delivery of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is prosperity; that is to grow a strong inclusive & transformative economy. We know that achieving this goal is very complex . . . .

In developing countries, we must . . .  renew efforts at improving agricultural systems for inclusive growth through increase in productivity of agriculture, livestock and fisheries, better rural infrastructure, innovative farming practices and more effective natural resource management.

We need, as a game changer, increased investment in R4D. . . . [A] cross-sectoral approach is key through the involvement of farmers and all stakeholders along the value chain of actors.

The challenge is to produce more and better food with fewer resources through technological innovation.

Frankenthaler_ALittleZen_1970

‘A Little Zen’, 1970.

Ruth Meinzen-Dick, senior research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
Meinzen-Dick has coordinated the CGIAR Program on Collective Action and Property Rights (CAPRi), which works with all CGIAR centres, since 1996.

I was glad to see the emphasis on inclusive development and am concerned that focusing on ‘prosperity’ should not take attention away from the need to pay attention to the poor and marginalized.

Creating prosperity for some is relatively easy; inclusive development is harder, but more meaningful.

An important way to achieve that is to strengthen assets, especially rights to resources for those who depend on those resources, including not only farmers but also pastoralists, fishers, forest communities, and women within those communities in particular. Assets are especially important because they create the basis for sustainable improvements in not only productivity but also welfare.

Frankenthaler_WhatRedLinesCanDo_1970

‘What Red Lines Can Do’, 1970.

Rajul Pandya-Lorch, head of 2020 Vision and chief of staff at the International Food Policy Research Institute
With her colleague David Spielman, Pandya-Lorch led a project on ‘Millions Fed: Proven Successes in Agricultural Development’, which identified and examined major successes in agricultural development and drew out the lessons they offered to substantially reduce hunger.

Greater rural prosperity looks like better fed, well-nourished people with decent, remunerative jobs who are able to withstand and bounce back from shocks.

To achieve greater rural prosperity, we must continue to invest in agriculture but also move beyond this focus to include investments in better nutrition and health, in social protection, in management of natural resources, in other words, in resilience.

Millions Fed examined pathways to success in six different areas: intensifying staple food production; integrating people and the environment; expanding the role of markets; diversifying out of major cereals; reforming economy-wide policies; and improving food quality and human nutrition.

Frankenthaler_LivingEdge_1973

‘Living Edge’, 1973.

S Mahendra Dev, director and vice chancellor of the Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research
Dev has written or edited 12 books, including the recently published Inclusive Growth in India: Agriculture, Poverty, and Human Development, and is a board member of the International Food Policy Research Institute.

Within agriculture, we should move towards non-cereals like pulses, oilseeds, fruits and vegetables and to allied activities like livestock, poultry and fisheries.

Studies show that countries lose 2 to 3% of GDP due to malnutrition. Similarly one dollar investment in improving child and maternal nutrition can give returns of $20 to $30.

The rural non-farm sector should be developed because agricultural incomes are not sufficient to reduce poverty in rural areas. . . . Sometimes the solution for agriculture may lie in non-agriculture.

The green revolution helped Asian agriculture in the 1960s and 1970s. We should extend the green revolution to African agriculture. But, we should go beyond the green revolution and have climate-resilient agriculture.

Frankenthaler_AGreenThoughtInAGreenShade_1981

‘A Green Thought in a Green Shade’, 1981.

George Bigirwa, head of the regional team for East and Southern Africa at the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa
Bigirwa worked for Uganda’s national research system for 23 years, contributing to the development and release of maize and rice varieties now popularly grown in Uganda and neighbouring countries.

[Agriculture] is a major engine for overall economic growth and possibly the single most important pathway out of poverty in the rural space.

In Africa, almost 75% of the population is engaged in agriculture and if one is to uplift their standard of living, the interventions have to be through agriculture.

Gone are the days when researchers would design interventions on their own and hand them over to end-users to implement or adopt.

Frankenthaler_SouthernExposure_2005

‘Southern Exposure’, 2005.

Peter Carberry, deputy director general for research at the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics
Before his recent CGIAR appointment, Carberry served as chief research scientist in Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation.

Farmers produce, consume and sell commodities; the currency of markets are commodities; the pathways for agricultural development are largely built on commodity value chains and markets. Hence, rural prosperity looks like farmers producing, consuming and, critically, benefiting from selling their cereal, legume, livestock, cash crop and wood commodities into functional and developing value chains and markets.

The impressive performance of Australian dryland agriculture has been achieved through innovation, based on research leading to technology development and adoption. . . . Australia shares the same climate, soils and agro-ecology as much of the developing world where agricultural livelihoods need to improve.

Australian farming is unsubsidized, conducted on fragile soils and in one of the most variable climates in the world.

Frankenthaler_WeatherChange_1963

‘Weather Change’, 1963.

Fentahun Mengistu, director general of the Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research
Mengistu previously served as director of Ethiopia’s Agricultural Research Stations and director general of Amhara State Agricultural Research Institute.

[M]odern biosciences can help achieve higher yields with fewer resources and less impact on human and environmental health.

[M]ethodologies of today [will] be insufficient for the future. With the new speed of change and diversified portfolio of small-scale farmers, targeting a single problem will be inadequate.

Future research [will] need to address multiple challenges at a time. Therefore systems research is increasingly needed with the collective action of many disciplines and institutions at various fronts.

Frankenthaler_WindDirections_1970

‘Wind Directions’, 1970.

Kei Otsuka, professor at Kobe University and Tokyo’s National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies
Otsuka serves on the Global Rice Science Partnership oversight committee and has published books on the Asian and African green revolutions.

I believe that we should support Green Revolution in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly for maize and rice. In addition to ‘seed-fertilizer technology’, ‘improved management practices’ are important. But the latter aspect has been largely neglected in CGIAR research.

For rice, transferability of Asian technology is high, so that what is important is to strengthen extension. For maize, farming system research, which seeks the best combination of manure and chemical fertilizer application, intercropping between maize and legumes, hybrid seeds, the use of improved cows, and production of feed crops, needs to be done.

More collaboration between CIMMYT and ILRI is clearly needed.

Frankenthaler_Harbinger_1986

‘Harbinger’, 1986.

Tom Tomich, founding director of the Agricultural Sustainability Institute and inaugural holder of the WK Kellogg Endowed Chair in Sustainable Food Systems at the University of California at Davis
Tomich directs the UC statewide Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program and serves on a number of committees and boards, including the CGIAR Independent Science and Partnership Council.

No country—putting aside city states—has achieved prosperity without growth in productivity in multiple sectors (agriculture, industry, services) and in fact for many countries this growth process has been mutually reinforcing. So while agricultural productivity does play a central role, agriculture cannot do the job alone. Equally important regarding prosperity, which includes elimination of the interrelated scourges of mass poverty and chronic hunger, history also indicates that equity of distribution of these gains is essential.

Since at least the 1990s—and certainly now with manifestations of impacts of climate change already apparent, it is clear we cannot think of the path to prosperity as assured—the sustainability and resilience of the food system (and our economies and societies more generally) must also be considered. Vulnerability of the food system to climate change is one of several interacting sources of uncertainty that means we also need to consider the wellbeing of people together with health of ecosystems.

To me, the big realization of the transition from the late 20th into the early 21st century has been that human activities are the primary driver of change (for better or worse) in the Earth’s life support systems, including our food systems, and we need to take seriously the strategically important system feedbacks (epitomized by climate change, but also by a nexus like climate x energy x water) as the foundations of sustainable prosperity in the 21st Century.

Frankenthaler_SunshineAfterRain_1987

‘Sunshine after Rain’, 1987.

More information
Read the full interviews of these experts, all of whom will speak at the Science Forum next week, on the Science Forum 2016 blog.


Mining gender information in policy research

CRP 2: program news -

To date, this blog has highlighted many of the challenges faced when collecting sex-disaggregated data through household surveys. In this post, we shift our focus to the complexities of assessing gender integration in policy documents. We spoke with Tatiana Gumucio, a Gender Postdoctoral Researcher at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) about the evaluation of the degree of gender integration in national policies related to climate change, agriculture, and food security in seven countries across Central and South America. Conducted by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) in Latin America in 2014-2015, this was part of a larger project that had the goal of supporting Latin American policymakers to take into account gender in National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) and Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs). The desired output was a meta-synthesis of the degree of gender inclusion in countries’ climate change related policies, in order to provide policymakers with helpful information on best practices for gender integration. While some work has been done in other regions, a policy baseline like this had not been developed before for Latin America.

Tatiana gratefully recognizes support provided to this work by the CIAT Gender and Climate Change group and Mariana Tafur who was a consultant for this project and a co-author of the paper synthesizing its results.

 

The problem OR “I’ll bet you’re finding that the plans do NOT take gender into account at all”

To what extent do Latin American governments consider gender issues in their climate change policy documents? As we began to explore this issue, other CCAFS Latin America researchers often commented, “I’ll bet you’re finding that the plans do NOT take gender into account at all.”

It was true. Most of the documents did not mention gender. This was problematic because policies that do not take into account gender considerations risk inadvertently harming women. Due to gender gaps in control over productive resources, men and women face different challenges in adapting to climate change. “Gender-blind” policies have the potential to exacerbate gender inequalities while also failing to leverage the innovative capacities that men and women contribute to mitigation and adaptation strategies. For effective and equitable climate change planning and actions post COP21, policies must clearly address gender considerations.

...policies that do not take into account gender considerations risk inadvertently harming women.

The study

We were particularly interested in identifying best practices for integrating gender in climate change policy making. To this end, we identified a body of 105 policy instruments representing the climate change, agriculture, and food security policy environments of the seven countries. We then developed a rubric to qualify the strength of gender integration, based on frameworks developed by IFAD for gender inclusion in rural development programs and on feedback from colleagues. The rubric used a scale ranging from one, signifying absence of reference to gender issues, to five, signifying gender integration in policy objectives and action plan, with resources clearly earmarked for implementation. In this way, the rubric sought to measure much more than the absence or existence of references to gender; it aimed to critically evaluate policy instruments according to their potential to enable transformation of gender relations for greater gender equality.

For effective and equitable climate change planning and actions post COP21, policies must clearly address gender considerations.

The review of the policy documents revealed significant information gaps. Firstly, although we had been able to identify certain sectors and countries that scored better on gender integration than others, we needed information on the processes underlying policy development in order to understand why these differences occurred. In particular, we sought information on motivations to include a gender focus and concrete measures taken to incorporate gender considerations in the policy-making process (for example, expertise sought from other divisions or institutions, type of consultative processes followed, use of available gender data, among others).

...although we had been able to identify certain sectors and countries that scored better on gender integration than others, we needed information on the processes underlying policy development in order to understand why these differences occurred.

Secondly, in order to better evaluate the strength of gender integration, more detailed information on policy implementation was necessary, for example, action plans, corresponding budgets, and monitoring and evaluation schemes. This type of information was essential for assessing if actions were developed to address gender equality gaps identified in the policy’s objectives and the extent to which the necessary funds were allocated.

To address such information gaps, we conducted group and individual interviews with contacts from the ministries and agencies involved in the development of the policies. While this helped us to hone in on possible best practices, this approach also had limitations. The logistics of such meetings were challenging due to the international span of the review and, relative to the number of the policies included in the review, few interviews were conducted. Furthermore, due to turnover in state agencies, it was not always possible to speak with those individuals who had developed the policies of interest.

Grey literature in the form of ministry reports would have been valuable, but these were rarely available. Information on action plans and budgets developed in conjunction with the policy were sometimes available online; however, this was not always the case.

The key takeaways

We learned several important lessons: Strong partnerships with state actors can facilitate access to non-public reports and evaluations related to policy development and implementation. In certain cases, ministry contacts made us aware of related policy documents, for example, an institutional policy on gender that we had not come across. Developments like these were more prone to occur when contacts had previous experience collaborating with CCAFS or our gender research group.

In addition, many of the policy makers did not understand the importance of gender or the purpose of our study. As researchers, we should have engaged earlier with them on gender capacity building and wielded strong communication skills when first establishing contact with ministry representatives. When these representatives fully understand the links between gender and climate change polices, they are better equipped to offer support and relevant information to researchers.

 

Further reading

Gumucio T, Tafur M. 2015. Influencing Gender-Inclusive Climate Change Policies in Latin America. Journal of Gender, Agriculture and Food Security 1(2):41-60.

Tafur M, Gumucio T, Twyman J, Martinez D. 2015. Guía para la integración del enfoque de género en políticas agropecuarias y de cambio climático en América Latina. Copenhagen, Denmark: CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS).

 

About the author

Tatiana-GumucioTatiana Gumucio is a Gender Postdoctoral Fellow in the Decision and Policy Analysis research area at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) based in Cali, Colombia. She is also the CIAT gender focal point in the Gender Integration Team of the Forest, Trees and Agroforestry (FTA) CGIAR Research Program. She received her Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Florida. At CIAT she has been involved in developing stakeholder engagement strategies to support policymakers to integrate gender in climate change adaptation and mitigation policies in Latin America. Her current research analyzes men’s and women’s uses of Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFPs) and trees-on-farms in order to inform the formulation of effective and equitable climate change strategies.

 

Featured image (top) by Manon Koningstein (CIAT)

This post is part of EnGendering Data, a blog on collecting and analyzing sex-disaggregated data to improve the knowledge base on the role of gender in agriculture and food security,  maintained by the CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM).

ILRI Addis – Comments and ideas towards the new gym

Latest ILRI announcements -

We are working so hard to arrange the gym with the expected quality and required equipment.   Therefore, we are planning to start different programs and would like to have your comments and ideas towards this.  Please kindly respond the questionnaire in the following link.

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1UxVNTfJ6iXd66fyz-RZ_QsbHg7vAokl-i2W6g595A0M/viewform

Please remember you comment is highly valuable for the coming programs and classes that will be arranged.

Admassu Wondimu|Housing, Catering and Conference Services Manager

ILRI Kenya staff appointments/Moves: January–March 2016

POD announcement -

Flavio Sacchini joined the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) as mycoplasma research specialist in January 2016. He is a member of the Vaccine Biosciences group and his task is to develop a live vaccinFlavio Sacchinie for contagious caprine pleuropneumonia together with colleagues and collaborators from ILRI and the University of Bern, Switzerland. Sacchini’s background is in veterinary immunology and he has a long track record in setting up Mycoplasma challenge models.Prior to joining ILRI, Sacchini worked as veterinary researcher for the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Reference Laboratory for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) and brucellosis at Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale of Abruzzo and Molise (Italy), focusing his research activities on CBPP pathogenesis and immunology and development of diagnostics and vaccines for CBPP and brucellosis. Sacchini is from Italy.

Johanna Lindhal has been appointed as veterinary epidemiologist at ILRI. She has worked in ILRI since April 2013 as a post-doctoral scientist in a joint appointment with Swedish University of AgriculturalJohanna Frida Lindahl Sciences, from where she also obtained a PhD, which looked at vector-borne infections. Her research at ILRI has focused on food safety and zoonotic diseases, especially on aflatoxins and Rift Valley fever, with projects in Kenya and India. Lindhal is from Sweden.

 

Abdou Fall was appointed project manager effective January 2016,  the United States Agency for Interntional Development (USAID)-funded Feed the Future Mali Livestock Technology Scaling Program that is scaliAbdou Fall at AASW6ng livestock technologies and development approaches.  Fall has a long experience of livestock research and development in West Africa and has recently been ILRI’s regional representative in West Africa. He will be  based in the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) office in Bamako and will establish the program’s management office there. The project is part of the Animal Science for Sustainable Productivity (ASSP) Program. Fall is from Senegal.

Augustine Ayantunde, Senior Scientist based in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso was appointed  the  interim regional representative for West  Africa,  in January 2016. He will provide oversight and Augustine Ayantunde, Animal Scientist, People Livestock Environmentrepresentation in the region.//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

 

 

 

Steve Staal was appointed program leader of the Policy Trade and Value Chain (PTVC) Program starting January 2016. He was previously ILRI’s regional represeSteve Staalntative for East and South Asia. Staal is an agricultural economist with vast experience of smallholder systems in Africa and Asia and in research and research management. He has held various positions in ILRI, including director of the (then) Market Opportunities Theme, and deputy director general. Staal is from the USA.

 

Christoph Weber has been appointed agri-business specialist in the Livestock, Gender and Impact (LGI) Program. He did his MSc in animal husbandry at Bonn University, Germany and he has a PhD. in rural sociology. His experience includes working with the German Development Cooperation–GTZ in ThailanChristoph Weberd, Malawi, Lesotho and Egypt between 1983–1993, and working in development projects in countries in transition in the former USSR (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Tadjikistan, Latvia and Estonia and Moldova) and the former Yugoslavia (Bosnia-Hercegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Kosovo). Weber has a long working experience in a broad range of agricultural and livestock development activities like institutional strengthening of public and private service providers, promotion of farmers’ self-help organizations, rural finance, and linking public and private stakeholders for the benefit of the rural communities. As a freelance consultant he also worked in monitoring and evaluation and various surveys and headed a number of project planning and appraisal missions. Weber is  German/Swiss.

Romano Kiome was appointed the program manager (chief of party) of the USAID-funded Feed the Future–Romano Mungiiria KiomeAccelerated Value Chain Development (AVCD) Program in February 2015. He is a graduate of the University of Nairobi, Wageningen University in the Netherlands (masters) and the University of East Anglia, United Kingdom (PhD in agriculture and natural resources management).  He has more than 26 years’ experience as post graduate research scientist, research manager and policymaker, and he has published widely with over 50 publications in journals, book chapters, reports, strategic plans, and policy papers.  He served as the permanent secretary in Kenya’s Ministry of Agriculture from 2005 to 2013 and from 2000-2005, he was director of the Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), now Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization (KARLO). Kiome has represented Africa in several international agricultural research entities, including, the CGIAR Executive Council (ExCo) and the Fund Council and has served as a member of the board of Trustees for World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CYMMIT), the World Vegetable Center (AVDRC), ILRI and he chaired the BecA-ILRI Hub steering committee for several years. Kiome is from Kenya.

Michel Dione was appointed animal health scientist in March 2016. His expertise is in identifying animal health constraints and opportunities through field surveys, participatory methods and biological sampling, field testing interventions for livestock diseases to improve animal health and human hMichel Mainack Dioneealth and developing and testing gender sensitive models of delivery of animal health services, including community-based health care in different livestock and farming systems. Dione has experience in animal health, infectious disease control and diagnosis. He is a Doctor in Veterinary Medicine, and holds an MSc in environmental sciences and a PhD in medical sciences from University of Antwerp, Belgium. Dione is from Senegal.

Edgar Twine has been appointed value chain economist in the LGI program, starting 1 February, 2016, after successful completion of a two-year post-doctoral fellowship in the same program. Edgar will be bEdgar Edwin Twineased in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania where he will continue working on the Tanzania dairy value chain. Edgar holds a PhD in agricultural and resource economics from the University of Alberta in Canada, an MSc in agricultural economics and a BSc in agriculture both from Makerere University, Uganda and a certificate in environmental economics and policy from the University of Pretoria. His research interests are in the areas of marketing economics, production economics, agricultural trade, finance and policy. Edgar is from Uganda.

Tom Kimanzi joined ILRI as head of facilities and projects in the Engineering Department in FebruarTom Kimanziy 2016. He is in charge of ensuring that the institute’s equipment, facilities, and plant are kept in good order and will also be spearheading ILRI’s new construction projects, including expansion, refurbishment of buildings and other related facilities. Kimanzi holds a BSc in civil engineering from the University of Nairobi and has over 20 years’ experience in engineering. Kimanzi is from Kenya.

Adan Kutu was appointed, in February 2016, as field coordinator for Isiolo County supporting the USAID-funded Feed the Future AVCD program’s livestock component in February 2016. He has more than Adan Abdi Kutuseven years experience in development work. Kutu has MBA and a BA degree in sociology, political science and public administration. For the last five years, has been working as a technical advisor with SNV Kenya supporting market systems development. He has vast experience in value chain development, multi-stakeholder processes, policy formulation both at the county and national level, project planning and management and market system development. He has worked in over 14 arid and semi-arid counties of Kenya and will play a major role in maintaining contact with the county governments and the state department of livestock to ensure successful implementation of the livestock component of the Feed the Future-AVCD program. Kutu is from Kenya.

Haret Hambe joined ILRI as field coordinator, based in Garissa County, in February 2016. He will be working for the livestock component of the Feed the Future-AVCD program. He will coordinate and implement the project activities and represent ILRI in the county. Hambe is a veterinary surgeon and is currentHaret Abdullahi Hambely pursuing his master’s degree in epidemiology and public health at the Royal Veterinary College in London. In the recent past, he worked with the County Government of Garissa as the deputy director veterinary services in charge of public health and food safety. In earlier engagements, he has worked with non-governmental organizations in Garissa, Turkana, Samburu and Pokot in Kenya, and in Moroto, Uganda.  Hambe is from Kenya.

Wema Adere joined ILRI nutrition specialist in January 2016. His main role is coordinating nutrition interventions aimed at increasing the dietary diversity of smallholder households, particuJennifer Wema Aderelarly women and children. Adere will design and oversee implementation of nutrition education, communications and behavior change activities aimed at improving the nutritional status of women and children, while working closely with national and county stakeholders. She holds a master’s degree in applied human nutrition from the University of Nairobi. She has previously worked in integrated nutrition programs with Goal Ireland in Sudan, World Vision in Somalia/Somaliland and Save the Children in Kenya. She is an expert in nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive nutrition programing aimed at improving the nutritional status of vulnerable communities. Adere is from Kenya.

Richard Basil joined ILRI supply chain manager in February 2016. His main role is to provide strategic technical leadership to the three supply chain units (Procurement, Stores and Transport). Richard holds an MSc in procurement and logistics management. He is a member with the Chartered Institute of SRichard Ndavi Basilupply Chain Management (MCIPS), and he has over eight years working experience in similar roles from several international humanitarian organizations, in different contexts including Dadaab refugee camps, Kakuma refugee camps, Western and South Nyanza in Kenya. His recent appointment was with CARE International in Kenya, where he was managing supply chain functions. Basil is from Kenya.

Paul Mwangi joined ILRI in March 2016 as field coordinator in the livestock component of the Feed the Future-AVCD program under the Livestock Systems and Environment (LSE) Program. Prior to joininPaul Maina Mwangig ILRI, he worked with the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries in Kenya. Mwangi has six years’ experience in the livestock development activities both in arid and semi-arid areas and high rainfall areas of Kenya.  He holds a MSc in food chain systems from Cranfield University, UK, and a BSc in food science and technology from the University of Nairobi, Kenya. Mwangi is from Kenya.

 

Laurence Ochieng joined ILRI as field coordinator of the dairy component of the , Dairy FtF Feed the Future-AVCD program under the LGI program. He hold an a MBA in entrepreneurship from KenyattLaurence Shikuku Ochienga University in Kenya and a bachelor’s degree in veterinary medicine (BVM) from the University of Nairobi. Prior to joining ILRI, he worked at TechnoServe Kenya as the technical lead in the poultry value chain. He has experience in dairy and beef management; animal feeds and general animal health and husbandry. His other key competencies are in animal welfare and rural development having worked in this sector for over 15 years. Ochieng is from Kenya.

Evans Hodari joined ILRI in January 2016 as office assistant under the Food and Safety Zoonoses. Previously, he worked in the hospitality industry in Kenya. He  has a diploma in business management Evans Hodari Otiendefrom the Tracom college school of business in Nairobi. Hodari is from Kenya.

 

 


Joseph Onam
joined ILRI as monitoring and evaluation- field support in the dairy component of the Feed the Future-AVCD program in March 2016. Onam holds bachelors and master’s degrees in agriculturJoseph Onamal economics from Egerton University in Kenya.He has vast experience in rural development having worked for Ministry of Agriculture for the last 19 years in various positions in rural districts of Kenya. He has been involved in implementing the Swedish government-funded National Soil and Water Conservation Project, the National Agriculture and Livestock Extension Programme (NALEP), the Agriculture Sector Development Support Programme (ASDSP) and the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)-funded Southern Nyanza Community Development Project (SNCDP). He has been a part-time lecturer at Kisii and Maseno University since 2010, teaching agribusiness and agricultural economics. He has in the past consulted for ILRI, ICIPE, Farm Concern International and many other developmental organizations and projects working with rural farmers especially on baseline and impact studies, situational analysis, data analysis, irrigation project feasibility studies and resettlement plans.  Onam is from Kenya.

Abdisemet Osman joined ILRI as the field coordinator for the Feed the Future-AVCD program livestock component in March 2016. He is based in Wajir, Kenya. He coordinates field activities aimed at increasing smallholder livestock productivity and market linkages through access to inputs and Abdisemet Bulle Osmanservices as well as uptake of productivity enhancing technologies working with the development partners and the county government. He also manages stakeholder relationships in the project. He holds a BSC animal production from  Egerton University. Osman is from Kenya.

 

Muthoni U. Njiru moved to the Feed the Future Kenya Accelerated Value Chain Development Program in March 2016 as the communication and knowledge management specialist.  This role will lead and coordinate the development of communications materials and organize communications and knowlMuthoni Njiru, Corporate Communications Officeredge sharing activities for the AVCD Program. Muthoni has particular expertise in event management, media engagement, multi-stakeholder process facilitation, organization management, and systemic knowledge management and training.   She holds a MSc in Organizational Development and BA in Journalism from the United States International University (USIU-AFRICA), certification in digital graphic design as well as a graduate of the Strathmore Business School Management Development program. She has obtained numerous awards from the Association for Communications Excellence for her graphic design campaigns and photography exhibits.  globally.

Samuel Oyola was appointed as ILRI’s specialist scientist in molecular biology and genomics in March 2016.  Samuel holds a PhD in Molecular and Cellular Biology from the University of Cambridge. Before joining ILRI, he studied functional genomics of Leishmaniasis and host-parasite interaSamuel Otieno Oyolaction as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of York. He then took a Scientist position at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge UK, where he worked on malaria; developing and applying high throughput Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies to study natural genetic variations in malaria parasite populations. He developed novel molecular tools that enable application and translation of NGS technologies into basic healthcare and public health applications. At ILRI, Samuel is using his experience and expertise in modern genomics, biotechnology and molecular biology to study and develop effective vaccines against livestock pathogens. Specifically, Samuel is focused on developing tools to support high throughput sequencing and analysis of TCR and BCR gene repertoires at both population and single cell levels.  He is also actively involved in developing genomic capacity in Africa. Samuel is Kenyan.

Emily Kerandi re-joined ILRI in March 2016 as people & organizational development officer – learning & performance. She has more than 5 years’ experience in both operational and strategic management of the human resources function. Prior to re-joining ILRI she was working at Deloitte East AfricEmily Masese Kerandia as a Human Resources Officer and had also worked for over 4 years in the same organization when she started out her HR career. She is a recruitment specialist, having extensive experience in recruiting for positions internationally and nationally in both profit and not for profit organizations. She also has experience in other spheres of HR such as compensation and benefits, performance management and policy formulation. Emily holds a Bachelor of Business Administration degree from St. Paul’s University, Kenya and Higher Diploma in Human Resource Management from the Institute of Human Resource Management. She is currently pursuing a Master of Business Administration in Strategic Management from University of Nairobi.

 

Loyce Mbwaya|People and Organizational Development

ILRI Kenya staff appointments/Moves: January–March 2016

Latest ILRI announcements -

Flavio Sacchini joined the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) as mycoplasma research specialist in January 2016. He is a member of the Vaccine Biosciences group and his task is to develop a live vaccinFlavio Sacchinie for contagious caprine pleuropneumonia together with colleagues and collaborators from ILRI and the University of Bern, Switzerland. Sacchini’s background is in veterinary immunology and he has a long track record in setting up Mycoplasma challenge models.Prior to joining ILRI, Sacchini worked as veterinary researcher for the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Reference Laboratory for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) and brucellosis at Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale of Abruzzo and Molise (Italy), focusing his research activities on CBPP pathogenesis and immunology and development of diagnostics and vaccines for CBPP and brucellosis. Sacchini is from Italy.

Johanna Lindhal has been appointed as veterinary epidemiologist at ILRI. She has worked in ILRI since April 2013 as a post-doctoral scientist in a joint appointment with Swedish University of AgriculturalJohanna Frida Lindahl Sciences, from where she also obtained a PhD, which looked at vector-borne infections. Her research at ILRI has focused on food safety and zoonotic diseases, especially on aflatoxins and Rift Valley fever, with projects in Kenya and India. Lindhal is from Sweden.

 

Abdou Fall was appointed project manager effective January 2016,  the United States Agency for Interntional Development (USAID)-funded Feed the Future Mali Livestock Technology Scaling Program that is scaliAbdou Fall at AASW6ng livestock technologies and development approaches.  Fall has a long experience of livestock research and development in West Africa and has recently been ILRI’s regional representative in West Africa. He will be  based in the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) office in Bamako and will establish the program’s management office there. The project is part of the Animal Science for Sustainable Productivity (ASSP) Program. Fall is from Senegal.

Steve Staal was appointed program leader of the Policy Trade and Value Chain (PTVC) Program starting January 2016. He was previously ILRI’s regional represeSteve Staalntative for East and South Asia. Staal is an agricultural economist with vast experience of smallholder systems in Africa and Asia and in research and research management. He has held various positions in ILRI, including director of the (then) Market Opportunities Theme, and deputy director general. Staal is from the USA.

 

Christoph Weber has been appointed agri-business specialist in the Livestock, Gender and Impact (LGI) Program. He did his MSc in animal husbandry at Bonn University, Germany and he has a PhD. in rural sociology. His experience includes working with the German Development Cooperation–GTZ in ThailanChristoph Weberd, Malawi, Lesotho and Egypt between 1983–1993, and working in development projects in countries in transition in the former USSR (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Tadjikistan, Latvia and Estonia and Moldova) and the former Yugoslavia (Bosnia-Hercegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Kosovo). Weber has a long working experience in a broad range of agricultural and livestock development activities like institutional strengthening of public and private service providers, promotion of farmers’ self-help organizations, rural finance, and linking public and private stakeholders for the benefit of the rural communities. As a freelance consultant he also worked in monitoring and evaluation and various surveys and headed a number of project planning and appraisal missions. Weber is  German/Swiss.

Romano Kiome was appointed the program manager (chief of party) of the USAID-funded Feed the Future–Romano Mungiiria KiomeAccelerated Value Chain Development (AVCD) Program in February 2015. He is a graduate of the University of Nairobi, Wageningen University in the Netherlands (masters) and the University of East Anglia, United Kingdom (PhD in agriculture and natural resources management).  He has more than 26 years’ experience as post graduate research scientist, research manager and policymaker, and he has published widely with over 50 publications in journals, book chapters, reports, strategic plans, and policy papers.  He served as the permanent secretary in Kenya’s Ministry of Agriculture from 2005 to 2013 and from 2000-2005, he was director of the Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), now Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization (KARLO). Kiome has represented Africa in several international agricultural research entities, including, the CGIAR Executive Council (ExCo) and the Fund Council and has served as a member of the board of Trustees for World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CYMMIT), the World Vegetable Center (AVDRC), ILRI and he chaired the BecA-ILRI Hub steering committee for several years. Kiome is from Kenya.

Michel Dione was appointed animal health scientist in March 2016. His expertise is in identifying animal health constraints and opportunities through field surveys, participatory methods and biological sampling, field testing interventions for livestock diseases to improve animal health and human hMichel Mainack Dioneealth and developing and testing gender sensitive models of delivery of animal health services, including community-based health care in different livestock and farming systems. Dione has experience in animal health, infectious disease control and diagnosis. He is a Doctor in Veterinary Medicine, and holds an MSc in environmental sciences and a PhD in medical sciences from University of Antwerp, Belgium. Dione is from Senegal.

Edgar Twine has been appointed value chain economist in the LGI program, starting 1 February, 2016, after successful completion of a two-year post-doctoral fellowship in the same program. Edgar will be bEdgar Edwin Twineased in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania where he will continue working on the Tanzania dairy value chain. Edgar holds a PhD in agricultural and resource economics from the University of Alberta in Canada, an MSc in agricultural economics and a BSc in agriculture both from Makerere University, Uganda and a certificate in environmental economics and policy from the University of Pretoria. His research interests are in the areas of marketing economics, production economics, agricultural trade, finance and policy. Edgar is from Uganda.

Tom Kimanzi joined ILRI as head of facilities and projects in the Engineering Department in FebruarTom Kimanziy 2016. He is in charge of ensuring that the institute’s equipment, facilities, and plant are kept in good order and will also be spearheading ILRI’s new construction projects, including expansion, refurbishment of buildings and other related facilities. Kimanzi holds a BSc in civil engineering from the University of Nairobi and has over 20 years’ experience in engineering. Kimanzi is from Kenya.

Adan Kutu was appointed, in February 2016, as field coordinator for Isiolo County supporting the USAID-funded Feed the Future AVCD program’s livestock component in February 2016. He has more than Adan Abdi Kutuseven years experience in development work. Kutu has MBA and a BA degree in sociology, political science and public administration. For the last five years, has been working as a technical advisor with SNV Kenya supporting market systems development. He has vast experience in value chain development, multi-stakeholder processes, policy formulation both at the county and national level, project planning and management and market system development. He has worked in over 14 arid and semi-arid counties of Kenya and will play a major role in maintaining contact with the county governments and the state department of livestock to ensure successful implementation of the livestock component of the Feed the Future-AVCD program. Kutu is from Kenya.

Haret Hambe joined ILRI as field coordinator, based in Garissa County, in February 2016. He will be working for the livestock component of the Feed the Future-AVCD program. He will coordinate and implement the project activities and represent ILRI in the county. Hambe is a veterinary surgeon and is currentHaret Abdullahi Hambely pursuing his master’s degree in epidemiology and public health at the Royal Veterinary College in London. In the recent past, he worked with the County Government of Garissa as the deputy director veterinary services in charge of public health and food safety. In earlier engagements, he has worked with non-governmental organizations in Garissa, Turkana, Samburu and Pokot in Kenya, and in Moroto, Uganda.  Hambe is from Kenya.

Wema Adere joined ILRI nutrition specialist in January 2016. His main role is coordinating nutrition interventions aimed at increasing the dietary diversity of smallholder households, particuJennifer Wema Aderelarly women and children. Adere will design and oversee implementation of nutrition education, communications and behavior change activities aimed at improving the nutritional status of women and children, while working closely with national and county stakeholders. She holds a master’s degree in applied human nutrition from the University of Nairobi. She has previously worked in integrated nutrition programs with Goal Ireland in Sudan, World Vision in Somalia/Somaliland and Save the Children in Kenya. She is an expert in nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive nutrition programing aimed at improving the nutritional status of vulnerable communities. Adere is from Kenya.

Richard Basil joined ILRI supply chain manager in February 2016. His main role is to provide strategic technical leadership to the three supply chain units (Procurement, Stores and Transport). Richard holds an MSc in procurement and logistics management. He is a member with the Chartered Institute of SRichard Ndavi Basilupply Chain Management (MCIPS), and he has over eight years working experience in similar roles from several international humanitarian organizations, in different contexts including Dadaab refugee camps, Kakuma refugee camps, Western and South Nyanza in Kenya. His recent appointment was with CARE International in Kenya, where he was managing supply chain functions. Basil is from Kenya.

Paul Mwangi joined ILRI in March 2016 as field coordinator in the livestock component of the Feed the Future-AVCD program under the Livestock Systems and Environment (LSE) Program. Prior to joininPaul Maina Mwangig ILRI, he worked with the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries in Kenya. Mwangi has six years’ experience in the livestock development activities both in arid and semi-arid areas and high rainfall areas of Kenya.  He holds a MSc in food chain systems from Cranfield University, UK, and a BSc in food science and technology from the University of Nairobi, Kenya. Mwangi is from Kenya.

 

Laurence Ochieng joined ILRI as field coordinator of the dairy component of the , Dairy FtF Feed the Future-AVCD program under the LGI program. He hold an a MBA in entrepreneurship from KenyattLaurence Shikuku Ochienga University in Kenya and a bachelor’s degree in veterinary medicine (BVM) from the University of Nairobi. Prior to joining ILRI, he worked at TechnoServe Kenya as the technical lead in the poultry value chain. He has experience in dairy and beef management; animal feeds and general animal health and husbandry. His other key competencies are in animal welfare and rural development having worked in this sector for over 15 years. Ochieng is from Kenya.

Evans Hodari joined ILRI in January 2016 as office assistant under the Food and Safety Zoonoses. Previously, he worked in the hospitality industry in Kenya. He  has a diploma in business management Evans Hodari Otiendefrom the Tracom college school of business in Nairobi. Hodari is from Kenya.

 

 


Joseph Onam
joined ILRI as monitoring and evaluation- field support in the dairy component of the Feed the Future-AVCD program in March 2016. Onam holds bachelors and master’s degrees in agriculturJoseph Onamal economics from Egerton University in Kenya.He has vast experience in rural development having worked for Ministry of Agriculture for the last 19 years in various positions in rural districts of Kenya. He has been involved in implementing the Swedish government-funded National Soil and Water Conservation Project, the National Agriculture and Livestock Extension Programme (NALEP), the Agriculture Sector Development Support Programme (ASDSP) and the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)-funded Southern Nyanza Community Development Project (SNCDP). He has been a part-time lecturer at Kisii and Maseno University since 2010, teaching agribusiness and agricultural economics. He has in the past consulted for ILRI, ICIPE, Farm Concern International and many other developmental organizations and projects working with rural farmers especially on baseline and impact studies, situational analysis, data analysis, irrigation project feasibility studies and resettlement plans.  Onam is from Kenya.

Abdisemet Osman joined ILRI as the field coordinator for the Feed the Future-AVCD program livestock component in March 2016. He is based in Wajir, Kenya. He coordinates field activities aimed at increasing smallholder livestock productivity and market linkages through access to inputs and Abdisemet Bulle Osmanservices as well as uptake of productivity enhancing technologies working with the development partners and the county government. He also manages stakeholder relationships in the project. He holds a BSC animal production from  Egerton University. Osman is from Kenya.

 

Muthoni U. Njiru moved to the Feed the Future Kenya Accelerated Value Chain Development Program in March 2016 as the communication and knowledge management specialist.  This role will lead and coordinate the development of communications materials and organize communications and knowlMuthoni Njiru, Corporate Communications Officeredge sharing activities for the AVCD Program. Muthoni has particular expertise in event management, media engagement, multi-stakeholder process facilitation, organization management, and systemic knowledge management and training.   She holds a MSc in Organizational Development and BA in Journalism from the United States International University (USIU-AFRICA), certification in digital graphic design as well as a graduate of the Strathmore Business School Management Development program. She has obtained numerous awards from the Association for Communications Excellence for her graphic design campaigns and photography exhibits.  globally.

Samuel Oyola was appointed as ILRI’s specialist scientist in molecular biology and genomics in March 2016.  Samuel holds a PhD in Molecular and Cellular Biology from the University of Cambridge. Before joining ILRI, he studied functional genomics of Leishmaniasis and host-parasite interaSamuel Otieno Oyolaction as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of York. He then took a Scientist position at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge UK, where he worked on malaria; developing and applying high throughput Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies to study natural genetic variations in malaria parasite populations. He developed novel molecular tools that enable application and translation of NGS technologies into basic healthcare and public health applications. At ILRI, Samuel is using his experience and expertise in modern genomics, biotechnology and molecular biology to study and develop effective vaccines against livestock pathogens. Specifically, Samuel is focused on developing tools to support high throughput sequencing and analysis of TCR and BCR gene repertoires at both population and single cell levels.  He is also actively involved in developing genomic capacity in Africa. Samuel is Kenyan.

Emily Kerandi re-joined ILRI in March 2016 as people & organizational development officer – learning & performance. She has more than 5 years’ experience in both operational and strategic management of the human resources function. Prior to re-joining ILRI she was working at Deloitte East AfricEmily Masese Kerandia as a Human Resources Officer and had also worked for over 4 years in the same organization when she started out her HR career. She is a recruitment specialist, having extensive experience in recruiting for positions internationally and nationally in both profit and not for profit organizations. She also has experience in other spheres of HR such as compensation and benefits, performance management and policy formulation. Emily holds a Bachelor of Business Administration degree from St. Paul’s University, Kenya and Higher Diploma in Human Resource Management from the Institute of Human Resource Management. She is currently pursuing a Master of Business Administration in Strategic Management from University of Nairobi.

 

Loyce Mbwaya|People and Organizational Development

Healthy animals, healthy households – Gender, diseases and improved rural livelihoods

CRP 3.7 News -

Improving animal health is the focus of one of the flagship projects of the Livestock and Fish CGIAR research program. It aims to identify and control animal disease threats, including those with public health dimensions, and improve the health of herds and flocks so livestock keepers can benefit from more productive animals and greater food security.

Michel Dione

In 2015, ILRI scientists leading small ruminant and pig health projects in Ethiopia and Uganda took a special interest in the (human) gender dimensions of their projects.

Working with the Livestock and Fish Gender Initiative, veterinarians Barbara Wieland and Michel Dione carried out further gender analysis in their projects to discover ways this could improve the design and delivery of animal health gains to the communities they work with.

While both work on animal health issues, the project situations are quite different.

Dione’s work formed part the program’s work in the smallholder pig value chain in Uganda and focuses very specifically on the threats and control of African Swine fever (ASF). This is a huge menace. There are no vaccines yet, the disease spreads quickly and many animals can die in a few days. Entire herds can be wiped out.

Biosecurity is so far the only way to control the disease – preventing transmission and eliminating the virus in the farm. This requires knowledge, skills, money to buy disinfectant, and fast decision-making when an outbreak happens. While pigs may suffer from other chronic illnesses that limit their productivity, ASF outbreaks are the recurring ‘killers’ that also wipe out family incomes.

Barbara Wieland

Wieland works in a project to transform the small ruminant – sheep and goat – value chain in Ethiopia. Like in Uganda, the health elements form part of a wider effort addressing the feeding, genetics and market dimensions of the whole chain. In the communities where she works, the sheep and goats are known to be especially close and critical to the livelihoods of women.

According to Wieland, participatory epidemiology studies in the project show “most animals have some loss of potential due to poor health and diseases.” Moreover, disease outbreaks leading to high mortality in animals are familiar to farmers.

Gender and animal health

Both projects started knowing that women have important roles in caring for their animals.

In Uganda, Dione wants to target ASF biocontrol interventions so better understanding gender roles, motivations and division of labour seemed a good way to gain improved insights. A literature review revealed hardly any past work in this area, so focus group discussions and surveys were carried out. Results showed indeed a “pattern of division of roles” in which women mainly do daily cleaning, feeding, watering, feed preparation and waste clean-up and men are involved in pen construction and off-farm marketing, purchase of feeds, and sourcing for pig health services and inputs. Women may sometimes take on tasks like spraying parasite control, treating pigs against diseases, heat detection and record keeping. Ownership of the pigs is a key factor in this division of tasks; women owning their own pigs tend to take on more diverse tasks.

Dione also noticed some trends that are important to his project. First, under ‘normal’ conditions without any outbreaks, women and men have clear role and task divisions with women especially taking on routine care and hygiene tasks and alert to any issues that may affect their own family’s health and hygiene. The women are thus often well-positioned to signal and detect animal health problems arising. Second, in these routine tasks, women come in close contact with detergents, chemicals, waste and potential zoonotic (animal to human) infections. These occupational risks and hazards need to be addressed. Third, when there is an ASF outbreak, gender norms and role divisions are put aside and all household members get involved in the biocontrol measures such as reporting to the local veterinary office, cleaning, disinfecting, isolating infected animals, heating swill to kill the virus, etc.

In Ethiopia, Wieland knew from previous work that diseases have a large impact on the productivity of small ruminants. Moreover, women, she says “directly depend on income from sheep and goats to run the household and to provide food for the family.” She was keen to use gender analysis to better understand the effects of animal diseases on households and their exposure to risks. The research approach followed a similar pattern as in Uganda: First a rather fruitless literature review followed by focus group discussions and household surveys.

Testing sheep for pathogens

Results showed that that women “know as much as men about diseases of sheep and goats – and they often know a lot more.” This is because they also work closely with the animals, feeding and watering them, cleaning barns and looking after the young and the sick. Men help with feeding, take animals to graze, select males for breeding and sell animals. The result of this is that women and men tend to know about, and typically prioritize, different types of diseases. Women tend to pick up on respiratory diseases as they work with animals in the barn. Men may see an animal walking in tight circles – a clear symptom of coenurosis, a common brain parasite.

This, she says, has serious implications for disease control. Men are the ones who call in and pay for a vet. Women have little say in such matters and anyway, her sheep and goats may not be perceived to be as valuable as, say, a cow. So certain types of diseases may go untreated – not because they are unimportant, but because women and their animals are not taken seriously when managing animal health. Sick or dying sheep and goats have disproportionate effects on women. Healthy animal provide healthy livelihoods for women and their homes. They are buffers in bad times, they can be quickly sold to raise cash, they provide milk and food in the home. If they are lost through disease, a woman has few other assets.

Significance and implications

Both scientists say the insights and results will lead to additional and differently-targeted interventions in their projects.

For Dione, the biggest change is in the ASF training that is offered. Typically, one person for household, usually the ‘manager’ was trained in biocontrol. Recognizing that an outbreak involves all of a family, future training will be broader to ensure that the women are involved and are fully informed about biocontrol measures. To ensure that the training is accessible to women, it will be ‘packaged’ differently to better suit their other commitments and needs. He will also explore ways this more inclusive training approach can be taken up by other projects in Uganda and by national extension services.

More generally, the project will look more closely at ways to minimize the daily occupational risks that women have as they care for their pigs.

In Ethiopia, Wieland has picked up on several important points. First, as diseases in small ruminants generally affect women’s livelihoods more than men (who may typically be more responsible for the more valuable cattle), the women have strong interests and motivations to participate in disease-control actions. The project will target women more specifically, ensure they are not excluded in planning etc., and train them apart. It will also explore ways to mobilize, train and support female community animal health workers to specifically work with women on the health of their animals. Women to women extension may open more doors to better health while such an approach could provide employment or business options for women.

Second, the project will seek ways to recognize and strengthen the role of women in detecting diseases. While the government is investing in improving reporting infrastructure, the system is hampered by poor disease awareness and underestimating what women know and can contribute. Targeting women in any disease surveillance and capacity building activities might be an effective way to improve reporting mechanisms, and being able to reduce or contain outbreaks.

Third, the project mobilized a number of vets and researchers to participate in the project. At the start, they typically were unaware of gendered approaches and perceived women to be uninformed about animal health. By participating in the project, their ideas changed. “The trained veterinarians changed their attitudes towards gender integrative research” and recognized that women have knowledge and insights they can learn from. The project will investigate ways these experiences can be taken wider in the veterinary profession, perhaps with the Ethiopian Veterinary Association and universities.

For both projects, the underlying sense is that women have greater potential and capacity to be more active players in animal disease management than was considered. This requires though that these roles are identified, valued and given support – through dedicated training, through adapted training, through new business opportunities, and through advocacy and awareness raising. Gendering animal health research has been a good start.

More information on the projects in Uganda and Ethiopia

 

In April 2016, scientists and gender specialists from the Livestock and Fish research program held a writeshop to synthesize results on gender integrated research. The full results will be published later in 2016.


Filed under: Animal Diseases, Animal Health, ASF, ASSP, CGIAR, CRP37, East Africa, Ethiopia, Gender, Goats, ILRI, Livestock, Pigs, Sheep, Small Ruminants, Uganda

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