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Developing an operational framework for river health assessment in the Mekong River Basin

CRP 5: Program news -

The objective of this project is to develop an indicator system to monitor and evaluate river health in the Mekong River Basin and demonstrate its application in a selected catchment—the Songkhram (Thailand). River Health Indicators (and corresponding health assessments) in the Mekong River Basin, and especially the study area, have traditionally been centered on river water quality parameters. However, other drivers of river health such as catchment disturbance, hydrological changes and riparian habitat conditions must be taken into consideration in developing a more complete River Health Indicators system. The proposed project seeks to plug existing gaps by developing a holistic indicator system, using a systems-based approach, at two scales – catchment and community.

Project Duration

January 2015 to December 2016 

Partners

Pollution Control Department, MONRE, Thailand; Thai Water Partnership, Thailand; Water Engineering and Management (WEM) of the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT) (lead)

Project Leader

Mukand S. Babel, AIT

This project is part of the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystem’s work in the Greater Mekong Region.

The post Developing an operational framework for river health assessment in the Mekong River Basin appeared first on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

Rivers for life and livelihoods: classification of river health in the Irrawaddy River Basin

CRP 5: Program news -

Understanding the health of a river requires monitoring spatio-temporal trends in the river’s ecological condition and its capacity to continue to provide users with the goods and services they value. This project draws on its partners’ Mekong and global experiences with River Health Frameworks to tailor a framework suitable for Myanmar, where conventional river monitoring is rarely available and government and community stakeholders need to draw on alternatives.

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Project Duration

January 2015 to December 2016

Partners

International Centre for Environment Management (ICEM) (lead); International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Myanmar Institute for Integrated Development (MIID), Environmental Conservation & Community Development Initiative (ECCDI)

Project Leader

Tarek Ketelsen, ICEM

This project is part of the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystem’s work in the Greater Mekong Region.

The post Rivers for life and livelihoods: classification of river health in the Irrawaddy River Basin appeared first on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

Rivers for life and livelihoods: classification of river health in the Salween River

CRP 5: Program news -

Understanding the health of a river requires monitoring spatio-temporal trends in the river’s ecological condition and its capacity to continue to provide users with the goods and services they value. This project draws on its partners’ Mekong and global experience with River Health Frameworks to tailor a framework suitable for Myanmar, where conventional river monitoring is rarely available and government and community stakeholders need to draw on alternatives.

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Project Duration

January 2015 to December 2016 

Partners

International Centre for Environmental Management (ICEM); International Water Management Institute (IWMI) (lead); Myanmar Institute for Integrated Development (MIID) and Myanmar Ecosystem Conservation and Community Development Initiative (ECCDI)

Project Leader

Robyn Johnston, IWMI

This project is part of the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystem’s work in the Greater Mekong Region.

The post Rivers for life and livelihoods: classification of river health in the Salween River appeared first on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

Balancing River Health and Hydropower Requirements in the Lancang River Basin

CRP 5: Program news -

With a vision of integrating both ecological and social values, this project is developing a multi-scale state and impact assessment framework, which it will apply to evaluate river health and the relationship between hydropower and river health. It studies key transboundary effect components including hydrology, sediment transport, water temperature, fish communities, flood, drought, and navigation.

Based on the evaluation and comparison with international best practices, the environmental mitigation and compensation measures of hydropower projects will be studied to fill existing knowledge gaps in the Lancang (upper half of the Mekong) River Basin. The project also studies the specific needs of women and impacts on women’s livelihoods, and factors that influence women’s participation in river health management. Findings will be shared with hydropower developers and regulators in Laos.

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Project Duration

January 2015 to December 2016

Partners

Asian International Rivers Center (AIRC), Yunnan University, China; Ecofish Research Ltd. (Canada) (lead); Faculty of Agriculture (FOA), National University of Laos

Project Leader

Yu Xuezhong, Ecofish

This project is part of the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystem’s work in the Greater Mekong Region.

The post Balancing River Health and Hydropower Requirements in the Lancang River Basin appeared first on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

Matching policies, institutions and practices of water governance in the Salween-Thanlwin-Nu River Basin: Towards inclusive, informed, and accountable water governance

CRP 5: Program news -

This project maps out the economic and political drivers and rationales – as well as their potential impacts – that shape water governance in the Salween-Thanlwin-Nu River Basin. Its goal is to catalyze more inclusive, informed and accountable decision-making, in particular ensuring that the rights and entitlements of marginalized communities, both women and men, are recognized. The project analyzes differences, including gender and ethnicity, and how these shape and are shaped by water governance processes and practices at multiple scales.

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Project Duration

January 2015 to December 2016

Partners

Green Watershed; International Water Management Institute (IWMI); Karen Environment and Social Action Network (KESAN); MA in International Development Studies (MAIDS), Chulalongkorn University, Thailand; Myanmar Academic Research Society (MARS); Paung Ku, Myanmar; Regional Centre for Sustainable Development (RCSD), Chiang Mai University, Thailand; Renewable Energy Association Myanmar (REAM); York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR), York University (lead)

Project Leader

Vanessa Lamb, YCAR

This project is part of the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystem’s work in the Greater Mekong Region.

The post Matching policies, institutions and practices of water governance in the Salween-Thanlwin-Nu River Basin: Towards inclusive, informed, and accountable water governance appeared first on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

A Space for Dialogue: People, Perceptions, and Principled Outcomes in the Governance of the Mekong

CRP 5: Program news -

This project is working towards four major outcomes: (1) consensus over, support for, and coalescence around a local definition of Good Mekong Governance amongst Mekong River decision-makers; (2) a negotiated vision of the institutional future that accounts for Good Mekong Governance and promotes equity in benefit sharing and an ecosystems approach to river management; (3) application of decision support tools that improve consideration of social and ecological concerns in the governance of the Mekong, with particular regard to hydropower and irrigation development; and (4) direct participation of women in river decisions. These efforts will be informed by traditional and action research and achieved via training, communications, engagement, and facilitated deliberations.

Project Duration

January 2015 to December 2016

Partners

Cambodian Development Resource Institute (CDRI) (lead); Institute of Water Policy, National University of Singapore; NGO Forum on Cambodia; School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg

Project Leader

Kim Sean Somatra, CDRI

This project is part of the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystem’s work in the Greater Mekong Region.

The post A Space for Dialogue: People, Perceptions, and Principled Outcomes in the Governance of the Mekong appeared first on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

Improving livelihoods in landscapes in the Volta Basin through strengthening farmer-led approaches to ecosystem-based management

CRP 5: Program news -

In the Volta Basin, poverty, inadequate access to income-earning opportunities, inequity, environmental degradation, conflict and increased competition over resources are threatening the livelihoods and ecosystems on which farmers and pastoralists depend. This project will identify and promote incentives for ecosystem-oriented land use change by examining the costs and benefits of on- and off-farm investments in northern Ghana. Knowledge generated by this research will be fed into participatory platforms for planning and implementing selected interventions that address specific challenges to the livelihoods of women, youth and men, and obstacles to increasing landscape productivity.

Project Duration

January 2015 to December 2016

Partners

The Association of Church-based Development NGOs (ACDEP), Tamale, Ghana ; International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) (lead); The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN); University for Development Studies (UDS), Tamale, Ghana

Project Leader

Katherine Snyder, CIAT

This project is part of the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystem’s work in the Volta and Niger Region.

 

 

The post Improving livelihoods in landscapes in the Volta Basin through strengthening farmer-led approaches to ecosystem-based management appeared first on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

Managing Bagré for equity and the environment

CRP 5: Program news -

In West Africa, agriculture is dependent on low and erratic rainfall. National governments and their development partners view the development of irrigation schemes as a way to improve food security and promote economic growth. But large water infrastructure projects can negatively impact both people and the environment. This project focuses on the area downstream of the multi-purpose Bagré dam, located on the White Volta (Nakambé) river. Through Companion Modeling, a participatory method that makes use of tools such as Role Playing Games, the project will derive important information on dam operation and management scenarios and their impacts on food security, the provision of environmental services and the distribution of the costs and benefits of planned investments. This project will work closely with national decision makers to improve their ability to engage in discussions about plans for and potential impacts of planned investments. In the future, decision makers will be in a position to use the project’s participatory tools to inform their activities in other sites.

Project Duration

January 2015 to December 2016

Partners

Agence de l’Eau du Nakambé (AEN), Bagrépole, Centre de coopération Internationale en recherche agronomique pour le développement (CIRAD) (lead organization), Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), International Water Management Institute (IWMI) and Laboratoire Citoyenneté (LC)

Project Leader

Daré William’s, CIRAD

This project is part of the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystem’s work in the Volta and Niger Region.

 

The post Managing Bagré for equity and the environment appeared first on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

Realizing the full biomass potential of mixed crop-livestock systems in rapidly changing Sahelian agro-ecological landscapes

CRP 5: Program news -

Beside meeting the demand for food and fuel by a growing population and the feed needs for sustaining livestock production, biomass is also crucial for sustaining regulating ecosystem services in the Sahel. For example, biomass secures a return flow of organic matter to impoverished soils that improves water holding capacity and soil fertility. This project uses two livestock systems value chains (in northern Burkina Faso and south-western Niger) to demonstrate the ability to transform degraded, low-productivity smallholder farms into healthy agro-ecological landscapes, if regulating ecosystem services are enhanced through practices such as biomass management. It will develop tools for integrated, participatory and gender-sensitive assessments of biomass production in mixed crop-livestock systems and identify potential opportunities for out-scaling. This project’s research will help to inform policy and development formulation by government ministries and departments in Niger and Burkina Faso.

Project Duration

January 2015 to December 2016

Partners

International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) (lead organization), International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Ministry of Animal Resources and Fishery Burkina Faso, Ministry of Animal Resources Niger, SNV Burkina Faso, SNV Niger, and Wageningen University, The Netherlands.

Project Leader

Augustine Ayantunde, ILRI Burkina Faso

This project is part of the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystem’s work in the Volta and Niger Region.

 

The post Realizing the full biomass potential of mixed crop-livestock systems in rapidly changing Sahelian agro-ecological landscapes appeared first on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

Giving ‘latecomers’ a head start: Reorienting irrigation investments in the White Volta Basin to improve ecosystem services and the livelihoods of women and youth

CRP 5: Program news -

Irrigation investments have the potential to bring large rewards in terms of agricultural productivity, employment and income but few assessments integrate concerns regarding ecosystem services, livelihood impacts and youth and women empowerment. This project evaluates the impacts of selected irrigation systems on the White Volta Basin in Northern Ghana. It examines their contribution to enhanced rural livelihoods and gender and generational equity; and how ecosystem services underpin and are affected by this development. A comparative analysis of systems at small, medium and large scales will assess and explain relative differences in the systems’ contributions to livelihoods, equity and healthy ecosystems. The project will also determine the potential for up- and out-scaling of irrigation investments that give women and youth a ‘head start’ and the changes in policy and skills needed to create positive incentives for the sustainable management of ecosystems and their services.

Project Duration

January 2015 to December 2016

Partners

Ghana Irrigation Development Authority (GIDA) (lead organization), International Water Management Institute (IWMI), University for Development Studies (UDS) and Women in Agricultural Development (WIAD)

Project Leader

Ben Nyamadi, GIDA

This project is part of the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystem’s work in the Volta and Niger Region.

The post Giving ‘latecomers’ a head start: Reorienting irrigation investments in the White Volta Basin to improve ecosystem services and the livelihoods of women and youth appeared first on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

Supporting investment decisions in water and land management across the rural-urban continuum in the Volta-Niger region

CRP 5: Program news -

This project uses an ecosystems-based approach to assess the effectiveness, adoptability and returns on investment of four proposed agricultural solutions for the Volta-Niger region. The approaches selected to be studied are: (1) small water infrastructure for smallholder farm irrigation; (2) drip irrigation; (3) safe and productive water reuse; and (4) nutrient and organic matter recovery from waste. The project analyzes the economic and environmental effects of these interventions by mapping ecosystem services, and assessing their benefits and trade-offs in terms of gender, equity, poverty alleviation and ecosystem health. Where appropriate, the project will also draw lessons and recommendations for scaling up these approaches and assess their business feasibility.

Project Duration

January 2015 to December 2016

Partners

College of Agriculture and Renewable Natural Resources – Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, iDE Brukina Faso, International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Women in Agricultural Development of the Ministry of Food and Agriculture – Ghana, and West Africa Science Centre for Climate Change and Adapted Land Use

Project Leader

Bedru Balana, IWMI-Ghana

This project is part of the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystem’s work in the Volta and Niger Region.

The post Supporting investment decisions in water and land management across the rural-urban continuum in the Volta-Niger region appeared first on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

The irrigation-hydropower nexus in the Ganges headwaters

CRP 5: Program news -

In Uttarakhan, India, approximately 450 hydroelectric (“hydel”) power schemes are being developed rapidly and haphazardly, primarily to meet power demands in the plains. While this energy source holds appeal for climate mitigation and livelihoods support, it has the potential to impact small-scale irrigation of staple and high-value crops; increasingly feminized crop/livestock-based livelihoods due to male out-migration; ecosystem services for gendered resource use; and ecosystem services. Through interdisciplinary research framing linked challenges in social-ecological systems terms, coupled with policy support for adaptive decision-making on hydel development, irrigation, and water supply, the tradeoffs between hydel and irrigation can effectively be minimized. This science-policy dialogue project, implemented in multiple Ganges sub-basins, will lead to improved livelihoods for women, youth, and men; safeguard and enhance critical ecosystem services; and offer irrigation-hydel nexus lessons for headwaters regions across the Himalayas and globally.

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Project Duration

January 2015 to December 2016

Partners

International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD); Kumaun University (KU), People’s Science Institute (PSI), University of Arizona (UA) (lead); University of Delhi (UD)

Project Leader

Christopher Scott, UA

This project is part of the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystem’s work in the Ganges Region.

 

 

The post The irrigation-hydropower nexus in the Ganges headwaters appeared first on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

Poverty squares and gender circles: unravelling agriculture gaps, challenges and opportunities in the Eastern Gangetic Plains’ (Bangladesh, India, Nepal)

CRP 5: Program news -

Persistent poverty in the land corridor connecting Nepal Terai, Eastern India and Bangladesh is accentuated by inequalities based on class, caste, ethnicity and gender. Despite multiple projects operating to mitigate widespread poverty, an enduring poverty persists. Recent studies indicate new agrarian crises, in particular a ‘feminization of agriculture’: a growing outmigration of a young generation of men from these poorly performing agrarian economies leaving behind women, who traditionally have restricted access to productive assets, services, infrastructure, institutions and markets to – manage emerging productive [as well as their traditionally reproductive] responsibilities. This project aims to reduce gender inequalities in the face of evolving governance, economic and environmental changes, by evaluating on-going development interventions and building the capacity of relevant stakeholders and actors.

Project Duration

January 2015 to December 2016

Partners

Interdisciplinary Centre for Food Security (ICF) at Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU);International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Nepal Madhesh Foundation (NEMAF); North Bengal University (NBU); South Asia Consortium for Interdisciplinary Water Resources Studies (SaciWATERS); Water Resources Management Group, Wageningen University and Research Centre (WUR) (lead)

Project Leader

Deepa Joshi, WUR

This project is part of the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystem’s work in the Ganges Region.

The post Poverty squares and gender circles: unravelling agriculture gaps, challenges and opportunities in the Eastern Gangetic Plains’ (Bangladesh, India, Nepal) appeared first on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

Reviving springs and providing access to solar powered irrigation pumps (SPIP) through community based water use planning: Multiple approaches to solving agricultural water problems in mid hills and Terai in Nepal and India

CRP 5: Program news -

The goal of this project is ensure affordable and sustainable access to drinking and agricultural water to women and men in the mid-hills and plains of Nepal and India. Farmers face economic and institutional water scarcity in these regions where water is plentiful but inaccessible due to lack of rural electrification or irrigation infrastructure in the plains, or because springs are increasingly drying up, as in the mid-hills. In order to improve the access of mountain communities and small and marginal farmers to water resources, new knowledge and technologies appropriate for them must be both rigorously tested in pilot studies and scaled up with support from stakeholders across the public, private and civil society sectors. This project tests two approaches to addressing water insecurity: the revival of local springs and piloting of solar-powered irrigation pumps. Where appropriate, strategies will be incorporated into local-level Water Use Master Plans to ensure their uptake.

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Project Duration

January 2015 to December 2016

Partners

Advanced Center for Water Resources Development and Management (ACWADAM); Atom Solar; Helvetas; International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) (lead)

Project Leader

Aditi Mukherji, ICIMOD

This project is part of the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystem’s work in the Ganges Region.

The post Reviving springs and providing access to solar powered irrigation pumps (SPIP) through community based water use planning: Multiple approaches to solving agricultural water problems in mid hills and Terai in Nepal and India appeared first on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

Restoring the Ganges: Healthier Rivers for Safer Water and More Productive Agro-ecosystems

CRP 5: Program news -

The Ganges River and its tributaries provide an extensive range of ecosystem services to riverine communities: water for cities and agriculture; fish production; recreational uses; and important sites for religious purposes to name a few. However, rapid population growth, uncontrolled urbanization and the resulting water extractions and pollution have reduced the provision of these ecosystem services and impacted productivity, the environment and peoples’ health and well-being. This project identifies and analyzes the feasibility of technical, economic, and institutional solutions to clean and restore riverine ecosystems and analyzes the potential for implementation of the most promising solutions throughout the river basin. Research results will be targeted to policy makers and public and private investors with the aim of supporting major initiatives of the Government of India such as the National Mission to Clean Ganga.

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Project Duration

January 2015 to December 2016

Partners

Institute of Rural Management Anand (IRMA); International Water Management Institute (IWMI) (lead); Modelling Partner; World Wildlife Fund-India

Project Leader

Javier Mateo-Sagasta, IWMI

This project is part of the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystem’s work in the Ganges Region.

 

The post Restoring the Ganges: Healthier Rivers for Safer Water and More Productive Agro-ecosystems appeared first on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

Community water management for improved food security, nutrition and livelihoods in the polders of the coastal zone of Bangladesh

CRP 5: Program news -

The polder ecosystems of the coastal zone of Bangladesh are home to millions of the world’s poorest and most vulnerable rural people. Their main source of food security is a single, low yielding rainy season rice crop. There are, however, tremendous opportunities to increase the productivity of land and water resources in coastal Bangladesh through the use of improved rice varieties followed by a range of non-rice dry season crops, and through the integration of aquaculture with rainy season rice. Realization of these opportunities requires improved water management (primarily drainage), which can be enabled by better use of existing ecosystem services in the tidal ecosystem and improved water governance. A pilot project demonstrates and evaluates a novel approach for improving water management for more resilient, productive and diverse cropping systems, and for sustainably improving water governance and equity in water use. Research results will inform government policies and donor investments for the region.

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Project Duration

January 2015 to December 2016

Partners

Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (BRRI); BRAC; Institute of Water Modelling (IWM); International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) (lead); International Water Management Institute (IWMI); Shushilan

Project Leader

Elizabeth Humphreys, IRRI

This project is part of the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystem’s work in the Ganges Region.

 

 

 

 

The post Community water management for improved food security, nutrition and livelihoods in the polders of the coastal zone of Bangladesh appeared first on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

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