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Kenya campus lunch and barbecue menu: Friday, October 17, 2014

Latest ILRI announcements -

Below please find lunch menu for Nairobi campus – Friday, October 17, 2014

Beef goulash soup – Kshs 70.00Barbecued Chicken Lollipop

Egg Noodles

Stir Fried Vegetables

Kshs 300/= Grilled Pork Chops‘Apple Sauce

Mashed Potatoes with Chives

Cabbage and Carrot Juliennes

Kshs 300/= Poached Fish with Julienne of VegetablesCarrots Rice

Steamed Broccoli

Kshs 300/= VEGETARIANChilli Panner

Boiled Rice

Indian Vegetables

Kshs 200/= VEGETARIANButter Beans Casserole

Chapatti

Vegetables

Kshs 130/= Fruit Salad @ Kshs  80/=Assorted Vegetable Salads @  Kshs 80/=

Vegetable Sushi  @  Kshs 350/=

Mixed Sushi  @  Kshs 450/=

Chicken Shawarma Assorted Sauces

And Salads  @ Kshs  300/=

Three Salmon Sushi  or Rolls @  Kshs 250/=

Six Avocado Rolls @ Kshs 200/= Friday barbecue (BBQ) menu Beef mshikaki with mushroomKshs 350/=

Grilled beef chipolatas with pineapple

Kshs 200/= Indo kebabsKshs 350/-

Chicken burgers

Kshs 400/-

Assorted pizzas

Kshs 300/=

Served with

French fries

Assorted greens

French beans mayonnaise

Tomato slices

Cucumber slices

Russian salad

 

 Mary Atieno | Conferencing Administrator

P.O.Box 30709, Nairobi, Kenya | Tel: +254 20 422 3343

Email: m.atieno@cgiar.org

Lost and found USB cable and missing golden belt

Latest ILRI announcements -

ILRI Kenya Security office is in possession of a lost and found USB cable if missing yours liaise with us on Ext. 3362.

A staff has reported to us of a lost golden belt if anyone has come across it please hand it over to security.

Godfrey

ILRI Security | Kenya Helpdesk

Emergency Hotlines: +254 728 970 722, +254 733 634 907,+254 20 2324721

New MOOC an ambitious and radical re-thinking of introductory statistics

Latest ILRI announcements -

A very simple…and free… Introductory statistics course – sign-up before the end of November to be able to access the resources.

With the world of data (big and otherwise) growing explosively, statistics education has to find ways to get much further, much faster.

By agreeing to produce a statistics MOOC, my university has given me the space and technical support to produce a prototype for introductory statistics that takes up the challenge of finding ways for getting much further into data much faster. The course, called “Data to Insight” launched on the UK’s FutureLearn platform 10 days ago.

https://www.stat.auckland.ac.nz/~wild/d2i/4StatEducators/

Most of the content is delivered in 42 five-minute videos. The course has a 8-week, “3 hours a week” structure and each week features just 30-minutes of instructional video. Within a few days, students are launched into a 10,000-observation, 70-variable dataset derived from a large observational health study (NHANES) and a dataset derived from Gapminder using 30 country-level indicators of over the last 50 years.

There are a large number of new ideas and approaches prototyped in this course and one of the main audiences I want to reach with them is other tertiary (university and college) teachers of statistics and research methods.

To make it easy for you to see quickly what has been done and how, I’ve made a combined course outline/index page which lets you bypass the normal course layout and jump right to particular movies.

The page is at:

https://www.stat.auckland.ac.nz/~wild/d2i/4StatEducators/ or http://tinyurl.com/4StatEducators

Access to the resources can be secured up until 30 November.

Chris Wild, Department of Statistics, The University of Auckland, New Zealand

World Food Day

CRP 5: Program news -

Family Farming: “Feeding the world, caring for the earth” World Food Day

Family farmers work on a significant portion of the world’s  agricultural land. They produce more than half of the world’s food, yet most family farmers are poor smallholders, who often do not own the land that they cultivate.

The UN declared 2014 as the International Year of Family Farming and World Food Day echoes this same sentiment to highlight the role of smallholders and family farmers in the context of today’s development challenges. A growing population is exerting undue pressure on today’s limited resources, which holds a significant risk for future generations.

Family farmers are therefore, a key piece in the process of feeding the world without wrecking the planet. Improving their lives and livelihoods will depend on healthy ecosystems that support sustainable agricultural development, human well-being and resilient food systems. It also requires that we view agriculture from a new perspective.

For WLE, this means rethinking agricultural development in the context of growing resources constraints and rising risks of abrupt changes that affect water, land and ecosystems. People and nature can co-exist and thrive but in order to do so, we need to develop innovative solutions that are sustainable, financially viable and equitable. These solutions should address problems from multiple angles and across various scales in order to assist decision makers to understand trade-offs and synergies so that we can work towards a future with prosperous communities, productive food systems and health land.

Follow the conversation this World Food Day on twitter #WFD2014.

For more on how WLE addresses these issues through its research across various scales, read our latest annual report which showcases how our work can help achieve big benefits for people and nature.

Click here to read our annual report: Big benefits for people and nature

Related resources:

AgEco on #WFD2014

Photo story: This #WFD2014, the International Water Management Institute (WLE’s lead organization) takes a look at some social and technological innovations that can contribute to a water-secure future for rural communities and family farmers.

Twitter chat: Join  a special World Food Day Twitter-chat, with Terry Sunderland, Principal Scientist at the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR). Start tweeting your questions now, using the ‪#‎FoodFor9bn tag on Twitter, and join the interactive chat from 2pm to 3pm UTC on October 16th. #WFD2014

How does CGIAR work together to address today’s challenges affecting smallholders?

The post World Food Day appeared first on Water, Land and Ecosystems.

How can sustainable intensification make farming climate-smart?

CRP 7 News -

Agriculture is a cornerstone of the climate change equation. While it is seriously affected by global warming, agriculture is also a major source of greenhouse gases which contribute to the problem in the first place. With more people to feed by 2050 prospects are grim if the sector follows business-as-usual practices. Scientists from the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) and partners call for sustainable intensification by millions of farmers in the South to drive a much needed climate-smart revolution and help change farming practices.  A recently published review paper discusses the links between sustainable intensification and climate-smart agriculture.

During September's United Nations Climate Summit, further evidence of global warming’s accelerating impact was given, from more rapidly melting arctic snow due to soot from increased wildfire to the drop in major crop yields in past decades. Maize global yields, for instance, may have reduced by 3.8% since 1980 due to warmer temperatures, a decrease equivalent to a fifth of current global stocks. Yet, we need to produce much more in coming years as the population bomb is ticking. When we know that the agriculture sector already emits up to 29% of global emissions of greenhouse gases  (GHG), we can predict a tremendous rise in carbon emissions from agriculture. To make matters worse, the rapidly changing global diet, fuelled by increasing urbanization, encourages farming of foods with a greater carbon footprint like meat and milk. Meat consumption is expected to reach over 450 million tons by 2050, about 50% more than current global production, which may boost GHG emissions due to the clearing of forests for more pasture.

The harsh competition for scarcer land and water resources between agriculture, industry and mushrooming city development means there is an obligation for farming to produce more crop and livestock with less land and water, and possibly with a smaller carbon footprint. This leaves governments in developing countries with a great dilemma.

A short cut is to intensify agricultural production through large scale commercial farming investments like in Ethiopia where the government has leased over a million hectares since 2005 under its Agricultural Transformation policy. This strategy generates significant revenues and jobs but the social and environmental impact is questionable, including issues like the protection of land use rights for pastoralists and a lack of proper environmental impact assessment of such investments.

In a new analysis, experts claim that sustainable intensification (SI) of millions of resource-poor farmers in developing countries is a good way to fill the food gap. In their view, SI has to be understood as a radical rethinking of our agriculture. If we can promote natural ways to increase the notoriously low productivity on the 1-2 hectares farmed by 500 million smallholder farmers in developing countries, we could help these farms benefit from their major production potential.

Many affordable innovations can improve yields on small farms such as clay pot irrigation or other appropriate on-farm irrigation techniques, access to better seeds that tolerate long dry spells, better soil fertility management and improved animal diets. The cherry on the cake is that these SI practices can also help smallholdings become climate-smart. Farmers reduce their need to clear land for farming as they get more per acre of land and per drop of water. In addition, their higher income means they have more resources to adapt to the changing climate.

Examples of SI's success include banana-coffee intercropping which can increase coffee farm revenue by more than 50% as it reduces pest incidence and helps the shade-loving coffee plants thrive. This approach also has mitigation co-benefits: it can store 15 to 30 tons additional carbon compared to traditional coffee monocropping. In the Sahel, the combination of soil and water conservation practices like stone bunds (mini dams to reduce soil erosion and runoff) and zai pits (planting holes filled with compost or manure) can double millet and sorghum yields.

However, the right policy and market mechanisms have to be in place to encourage the uptake of climate-smart practices by farmers. There may be some trade-offs like the need for extra labour so ways to ensure farmer’s participation are crucial for success. This is nicely illustrated by the example of Gokulpura village's silent climate-smart revolution. 

In this village in arid Rajasthan in North-east India, farmers and herders, over fifteen years, changed the way communal lands are grazed and managed. Under a watershed management initiative to fight against rampant land degradation, they agreed to build stone wall fencing to reduce wild grazing of the degraded commons and plant various tree species like the white leadtree (Leucaena leucocephala, named locally subabul) to provide nutritious fodder for their livestock. They were committed to this because of the benefits they saw. Adding leaves from this drought-tolerant tree to the animal diet can treble milk yield per day, or quadruple weight gain per day. By improving animal diet, this silvipasture farming system also improves rural livelihoods and is sustainable, low cost and climate-smart as planting trees in these degraded lands has increased carbon sequestration.  

Sustainable intensification of smallholder agriculture, if well conceptualized and promoted, could and should play an important role in contributing to a much needed climate-smart transformation of the global food sector. 

 

Download the article (Open Access)

Campbell BM, Thornton P, Zougmoré R, van Asten P, Lipper L. 2014. Sustainable intensification: What is its role in climate smart agriculture? Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 8:39-43

Related links:

Blog story: http://ccafs.cgiar.org/sustainable-intensification-tool-sustainable-food-system-toolbox

Journal article: http://ccafs.cgiar.org/publications/sustainable-intensification-agriculture-premises-and-policies

Blog story: http://ccafs.cgiar.org/blog/making-sense-sustainable-agricultural-intensification

ILRI Vacancy: Program Accountant – (Closing date: 28 October 2014)

Jobs -

Vacancy Number:  A/057/14

Department:  Animal Science for Sustainable Productivity Program (ASSP)

Duration:  Two years

The position: ILRI seeks a qualified Program Accountant to provide financial and budgetary support to staff in Animal Sciences for Sustainable Productivity Program (ASSP).

General: The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) works at the crossroads of livestock and poverty, bringing high-quality livestock science, communications and capacity building to bear on poverty reduction and sustainable development. ILRI is one of 15 centres supported by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR). ILRI has campuses in Kenya (headquarters) and Ethiopia, with other offices located in other regions of Africa (Mali, Mozambique, and Nigeria) as well as in South Asia (India, Sri Lanka), Southeast Asia (Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam) and East Asia (China). www.ilri.org. 

Specific Duties:

Proposal development – Budget development

  • Provides advice on project costing’s to staff toward development of proposal budgets;
  • Prepares proposal budgets for review by Programme Management Officer and Project Leaders or budget holders;
  • Support annual budget preparation by working with PMO;
  • Uploads project budget to the Sun System or other system used by ILRI.

Financial Accounting, Project Management and Donor reporting:

  • Prepares all projects’ payment requests for sub-grantees in collaboration with PMO and Project Leaders;
  • Follows up with finance to ensure timely payments to sub-grantees and ensures transfer advices are shared with partners in a timely manner;
  • Ensures project partners’ financial returns are submitted within set timelines. Reviews advance requests and financial returns by partners with reference to contractual obligations and partner financial obligations with liquidation effected in SUN;
  • Develops and maintains appropriate databases to ensure project financial management is done to meet various program financial demands;
  • Preparing detailed monthly, quarterly and annual internal financial reports as requested by PMO highlighting issues on over/under expenditure and adjustment of wrong postings in the system and also to facilitate monitoring and tracking of project finances, and decision making by Project leaders;
  • Maintains proper financial and non-financial project records of projects both in electronic (soft) and hard copies;
  • Prepares donor financial reports/statements in collaboration with PMO, Project Leaders and Finance department and maintains appropriate compliance donor reporting databases;
  • Computes project accruals annually and during project close outs and ensures they are captured in the system;
  • Ensures that all full costing recovery items are captured in the appropriate project;
  • Raises invoices and follows up reimbursements and transfer advices from partners/donors;
  • Leads project specific audit and supports external/internal audit as may be found necessary.

Project Settlements Reports, Travel Expense Reports, Travel Authorizations, Requisitions, Petty-Cash Replenish:

  • Reviews Project Settlement Reports, Petty Cash Replenish, Travel Expense Reports, Travel Authorizations (TAs) and Payment Request;
  • Following up project and travel advance settlements with staff and consultants to close outstanding accounts in short period of time.

Consultancy Management support

  • Providing assistance to the Programme Management Officer, Administrative Assistants and Project Leaders in the financial aspects of management of consultancies.

Minimum Requirements

Educational:

  • BA degree in Accounting or related field

 

Work Experience:

Training:

  • Professional training in Grants Management and Project Management are advantageous.
  • Intermediate to advanced computer literacy, including spreadsheets and accounting software

Skills:

  • Must be able to work independently with minimal supervision, but also participates as a team member in accomplishment of duties.
  • Possesses excellent interpersonal and communication skills, good judgment and a high level of respect for confidentiality.
  • Strong ability to co-ordinate, prioritize and organize workload; takes initiative and work under pressure.
  • Highly effective planning, organizational and multi-tasking skills with a positive attitude and strong accounting service orientation.
  • Ability to work in a multi-cultural environment.
  • Excellent spoken and written English.
  • Commitment to ILRI’s mission and core values

Duty Station: Addis Ababa.

Job level:            2C.

Monthly Base Salary: Birr 14,839 (Negotiable, depending on experience, skill and salary history of the candidate)

Terms of appointment:  This is a Nationally Recruited Staff (NRS) position, initial appointment is fixed term for two years with the possibility of renewal, contingent upon individual performance and the availability of funding. The ILRI remuneration package for nationally recruited staff in Ethiopia includes very competitive salary and benefits such as life and medical insurance, offshore pension plan, etc. 

The ILRI campus is set in a secure, attractive campus on the outskirts of Addis Ababa.  Dining and sports facilities are located on site.

Applications: Applicants should provide a cover letter and curriculum vitae; names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience to be included in the curriculum vitae. The position and reference number: REF: A/057/14 should be clearly indicated in the subject line of the cover letter. All applications to be submitted online on our recruitment portal: http://ilri.simplicant.com on or before 28 October 2014.

 

To find out more about ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org

 

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/

 

 

Suitably qualified women are particularly encouraged to apply.

 

More ILRI jobs

 

Subscribe by email to ILRI jobs alert

 

 


Kenya campus lunch menu – Thursday, October 16, 2014

Latest ILRI announcements -

Below please find today’s lunch menu for Nairobi campus – Thursday, October 16, 2014

Minestrone soup – Kshs 70.00

Braised Liver with Leeks & Celery

Ugali

African Indigenous Vegetables

Kshs 300/= Arosto

Turmeric Rice

Stewed Pea and Carrots

Kshs 300/= Grilled Tender Fillet Steak

Rosemary Roasted Potato Wedges in Skin

Fried French Bean in Pomodoro

Kshs 300/= Other Food Items:-

Ugali @ Kshs 40/=

Rice @ Kshs  40/=

Green Market Vegetables @ Kshs 30/= Vegetarian:

Mexican Kidney Beans

Chapatti

Vegetables

Kshs 130/= Fruit Salad @ Kshs  80/=

Assorted Vegetable Salads @  Kshs 80/=

Vegetable Sushi  @  Kshs 350/=

Mixed Sushi  @  Kshs 450/=

Chicken Shawarma Assorted Sauces

And Salads  @ Kshs  300/=

Three Salmon Sushi  or Rolls @  Kshs 250/=

Six Avocado Rolls @ Kshs 200/=

Mary Atieno | Conferencing Administrator

P.O.Box 30709, Nairobi, Kenya | Tel: +254 20 422 3343

Email: m.atieno@cgiar.org

ILRI Vacancy: Technical Assistant (Closing date – 27 October 2014

Jobs -

Vacancy Number:  A/056/14

Department:  Feed and Forages Bioscience

Duration:  Two years

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) seeks to recruit a Technical Assistant who will be a member of the Feed and Forages Bioscience Program in Addis Ababa.

General: The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) works at the crossroads of livestock and poverty, bringing high-quality livestock science, communications and capacity building to bear on poverty reduction and sustainable development. ILRI is one of 15 centres supported by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR). ILRI has campuses in Kenya (headquarters) and Ethiopia, with other offices located in other regions of Africa (Mali, Mozambique, and Nigeria) as well as in South Asia (India, Sri Lanka), Southeast Asia (Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam) and East Asia (China). www.ilri.org.

Responsibilities:

The Technical Assistant participates and assists in forage seed regeneration activities including:

  • Maintains forage plots weed free and labeled and harvest seeds;
  • Records field observation and characterization data and prepares update sheets;
  • Takes herbarium specimens;
  • Monitors plants for pests and diseases in greenhouses and field and takes remedial action;
  • Supervises daily labour for field activities;
  • Waters and takes care of plants in greenhouses and screen houses;
  • Assists with pre-germination, planting and maintaining forage seedlings in the screen house;
  • Assists with plant sampling and processing for germplasm health activities;
  • Assists in seed processing and packing;
  • Keeps the field, greenhouse and screenhouse areas clean and tidy;
  • Assists in general implementation of forage research activities at the site.Measurable goals:After training the technical assistant should be able to handle all field, screenhouse and greenhouse activities following standard operation procedures.

Skills Required:

  • Basic knowledge of plant propagation or seed production
  • Good communication skills in English
  • Good interpersonal relationships

Personal qualities required 

  • Careful
  • Accurate
  • Reliable and honest
  • Punctual

Education:

  • 10th and 12th grade complete minimum and College Diploma preferred

Experience:

  • 5 (Five) years for grade 10th and 12th completed or 2 (Two) years practical experience in plant propagation or seed production
  • On the job training will be provided

Special requirements:

  • The job requires work on weekends with day off during week days.

Duty Station: Addis Ababa

Grade: 1C

Minimum Base:          Birr 6,529 (Negotiable, depending on experience, skill and salary history of the candidate)

Terms of appointment:  This is a Nationally Recruited Staff (NRS) position, initial appointment is fixed term for two years with the possibility of renewal, contingent upon individual performance and the availability of funding. The ILRI remuneration package for nationally recruited staff in Ethiopia includes very competitive salary and benefits such as life and medical insurance, offshore pension plan, etc.

The ILRI campus is set in a secure, attractive campus on the outskirts of Addis Ababa. Dining and sports facilities are located on site.

Applications: Applicants should provide a cover letter and curriculum vitae; names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience to be included in the curriculum vitae. The position and reference number: REF: A/056/14 should be clearly indicated in the subject line of the cover letter. All applications to be submitted online on our recruitment portal: http://ilri.simplicant.com/ on or before 27 October 2014.

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/

Suitably qualified women are particularly encouraged to apply.

More ILRI jobs

Subscribe by email to ILRI jobs alert

 


Innovation platforms to enhance participation in rainwater management in Ethiopia

Nile Basin Development Challenge: Project News -

 ILRI/Apollo Habtamu).

Activities conducted as part of NBDC innovation platform work in Fogera (photo credit: ILRI/Apollo Habtamu).

This paper draws lessons from two years of work with ‘innovation platforms’ that were established by the Nile Basin Development Challenge (NBDC) program in an attempt to strengthen landscape-level rainwater management in Ethiopia. The NDBC’s work included the use of an innovation fund to support pilot interventions.

This paper particularly reviews questions of political economy and equity in platform activities and examines decision-making processes, the roles and level of influence of different platform members, the nature of platform-community relations and the extent to which different groups are benefiting.

The information presented in this working paper was gathered from a mixture of sources: interviews conducted with platform members; observation of meetings and activities by NBDC staff; official minutes of platform meetings and other associated events (e.g. training sessions) and informal discussions between NBDC staff and platform members.

This paper is the latest of a ‘research for development (R4D)’ series of working papers developed by the Challenge Program for Water and Food (CPWF).

Read the working paper ‘Innovation Platforms to Enhance Participation in Rainwater Management: Lessons from The Nile Basin Development Challenge with a Particular Focus on Political Economy and Equity Issues‘.

Discover the rest of the CPWF’s R4D working paper series.


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