Feed aggregator

ILRI at the Africa Livestock Conference and Exhibition (ALiCE) 2014 Conference in Uganda

CRP 3.7 Clippings -

Hope Ruhindi Mwesigye, Minister of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries and Edward Ssekandi, Vice president of Uganda

ILRI at the 2014 African Livestock Conference and Exhibition (ALiCE2014): ILRI’s Danilo Pezo receives a gift in recognition of ILRI’s sponsorship role presented by Uganda Vice President Edward Ssekandi and Uganda Minister of State for Animal Industry Bright Rwamirama (photo credit: ILRI).

Article by Danilo Pezo, ILRI country representative in Uganda, and Evelyn Katingi, communications officer for the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) participated actively in the African Livestock Conference and Exhibition (ALiCE2014), the theme of which was ‘Developing livestock value chains and improving livelihood in Africa‘, held at the Speke Resort & Conference Centre, in Kampala, Uganda, 18–20 June 2014.

Members of ILRI’s office in Uganda served on the conference’s hosting committee, which was led by Nicholas Kauta, director of Animal Resources of the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industries and Fisheries (MAAIF). The opening speech and inauguration of the conference were made by Edward Kiwanuka Ssekandi, vice president of Uganda, who was also the conference’s guest of honour.

Danilo Pezo, ILRI’s country representative in Uganda, gave a keynote presentation in the inaugural session—Evolution of animal production in Africa and other emerging markets—on behalf of ILRI’s director general, Jimmy Smith.

Key messages delivered by ILRI’s Pezo
• In 2030, demand for animal-source foods in sub-Saharan Africa will double that of 2000
• While monogastric production (pigs and poultry) in Africa is in rapid transition to industrial systems, at least 30% of pig production will remain in smallholder hands by 2015
• Smallholder mixed crop-and-livestock farmers are competitive:
> 90% of pig production in Uganda is made by smallholders (there are great opportunities for increasing pig productivity if diseases such as Africa swine fever are better controlled and farmers gain better access to technology and market information)
> 1 million smallholders in Kenya keep Africa’s largest dairy herd

ILRI’s Emily Ouma, agriculture economist, and Michel Dione, post-doctoral fellow in animal health–epidemiology, were discussants in ALiCE2014 sessions on ‘Livestock Industry Sector Policies and Economics’, and ‘Animal Health and Welfare’, respectively.

Vice president of Uganda Hon. Edward Ssekandi, right being handed ILRI's brochure by ILRI's Emily Ouma and Danilo Pezo at the ILRI exhibit

Emily Ouma and Danilo Pezo talk to the Ugandan Vice-President Edward Ssekandi at ILRI’s exhibit at ALiCE2014 (photo credit: ILRI).

Ugandan Vice-President Ssekandi and Minister of State for Animal Industry Rwamirama heard about ILRI’s work, particularly two Uganda projects− Smallholder Pig Value Chains Development in Uganda (SPVCD) and Safe Food Fair Food (SFFF) − at ILRI’s exhibition stand. ILRI’s exhibit provided information on other work done by ILRI in different livestock systems and value chains in Africa. Information on multi-institutional CGIAR research programs that ILRI and its partners are participating in was also highlighted. Visitors to ILRI’s exhibit stand included members of the media and farmer groups and general public; national and local government officers; researchers and lecturers from African universities; and representatives of financial institutions and private-sector companies..

ILRI’s Tony Brenton-Rule, head of business development, and Azage Tegegne, manager of the ILRI-led Livestock and Irrigation Value Chains for Ethiopian Smallholders project, also participated in ALICE 2014 and were at hand to answer questions from visitors to ILRI’s exhibit.

 


Filed under: Agri-Health, Animal Production, ASF, CRP37, CRP4, East Africa, Event report, Food Safety, FSZ, ILRI, ILRIComms, Integrated Sciences, Kenya, PA, Pigs, Uganda Tagged: ALiCE2014, Danilo Pezo, Emily Ouma, LIVES, Safe Food Fair Food, Uganda Minister of State for Animal Industry, Uganda Vice President

ILRI at the Africa Livestock Conference and Exhibition (ALiCE) 2014 Conference in Uganda

CRP 4 Clippings -

Hope Ruhindi Mwesigye, Minister of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries and Edward Ssekandi, Vice president of Uganda

ILRI at the 2014 African Livestock Conference and Exhibition (ALiCE2014): ILRI’s Danilo Pezo receives a gift in recognition of ILRI’s sponsorship role presented by Uganda Vice President Edward Ssekandi and Uganda Minister of State for Animal Industry Bright Rwamirama (photo credit: ILRI).

Article by Evelyn Katingi, communications officer for the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish.

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) participated actively in the African Livestock Conference and Exhibition (ALiCE2014), the theme of which was ‘Developing livestock value chains and improving livelihood in Africa‘, held at the Speke Resort & Conference Centre, in Kampala, Uganda, 18–20 June 2014.

Members of ILRI’s office in Uganda served on the conference’s hosting committee, which was led by Nicholas Kauta, director of Animal Resources of the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industries and Fisheries (MAAIF). The opening speech and inauguration of the conference were made by Edward Kiwanuka Ssekandi, vice president of Uganda, who was also the conference’s guest of honour.

Danilo Pezo, ILRI’s country representative in Uganda, gave a keynote presentation in the inaugural session—Evolution of animal production in Africa and other emerging markets—on behalf of ILRI’s director general, Jimmy Smith.

Key messages delivered by ILRI’s Pezo
• In 2030, demand for animal-source foods in sub-Saharan Africa will double that of 2000
• While monogastric production (pigs and poultry) in Africa is in rapid transition to industrial systems, at least 30% of pig production will remain in smallholder hands by 2015
• Smallholder mixed crop-and-livestock farmers are competitive:
> 90% of pig production in Uganda is made by smallholders (there are great opportunities for increasing pig productivity if diseases such as Africa swine fever are better controlled and farmers gain better access to technology and market information)
> 1 million smallholders in Kenya keep Africa’s largest dairy herd

ILRI’s Emily Ouma, agriculture economist, and Michel Dione, post-doctoral fellow in animal health–epidemiology, were discussants in ALiCE2014 sessions on ‘Livestock Industry Sector Policies and Economics’, and ‘Animal Health and Welfare’, respectively.

Vice president of Uganda Hon. Edward Ssekandi, right being handed ILRI's brochure by ILRI's Emily Ouma and Danilo Pezo at the ILRI exhibit

Emily Ouma and Danilo Pezo talk to the Ugandan Vice-President Edward Ssekandi at ILRI’s exhibit at ALiCE2014 (photo credit: ILRI).

Ugandan Vice-President Ssekandi and Minister of State for Animal Industry Rwamirama heard about ILRI’s work, particularly two Uganda projects− Smallholder Pig Value Chains Development in Uganda (SPVCD) and Safe Food Fair Food (SFFF) − at ILRI’s exhibition stand. ILRI’s exhibit provided information on other work done by ILRI in different livestock systems and value chains in Africa. Information on multi-institutional CGIAR research programs that ILRI and its partners are participating in was also highlighted. Visitors to ILRI’s exhibit stand included members of the media and farmer groups and general public; national and local government officers; researchers and lecturers from African universities; and representatives of financial institutions and private-sector companies..

ILRI’s Tony Brenton-Rule, head of business development, and Azage Tegegne, manager of the ILRI-led Livestock and Irrigation Value Chains for Ethiopian Smallholders project, also participated in ALICE 2014 and were at hand to answer questions from visitors to ILRI’s exhibit.

 


Filed under: Agri-Health, Animal Production, ASF, CRP37, CRP4, East Africa, Event report, Food Safety, FSZ, ILRI, ILRIComms, Integrated Sciences, Kenya, PA, Pigs, Uganda Tagged: ALiCE2014, Danilo Pezo, Emily Ouma, LIVES, Safe Food Fair Food, Uganda Minister of State for Animal Industry, Uganda Vice President

ILRI at the Africa Livestock Conference and Exhibition (ALiCE) 2014 Conference in Uganda

PA Clippings -

Hope Ruhindi Mwesigye, Minister of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries and Edward Ssekandi, Vice president of Uganda

ILRI at the 2014 African Livestock Conference and Exhibition (ALiCE2014): ILRI’s Danilo Pezo receives a gift in recognition of ILRI’s sponsorship role presented by Uganda Vice President Edward Ssekandi and Uganda Minister of State for Animal Industry Bright Rwamirama (photo credit: ILRI).

Article by Evelyn Katingi, communications officer for the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish.

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) participated actively in the African Livestock Conference and Exhibition (ALiCE2014), the theme of which was ‘Developing livestock value chains and improving livelihood in Africa‘, held at the Speke Resort & Conference Centre, in Kampala, Uganda, 18–20 June 2014.

Members of ILRI’s office in Uganda served on the conference’s hosting committee, which was led by Nicholas Kauta, director of Animal Resources of the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industries and Fisheries (MAAIF). The opening speech and inauguration of the conference were made by Edward Kiwanuka Ssekandi, vice president of Uganda, who was also the conference’s guest of honour.

Danilo Pezo, ILRI’s country representative in Uganda, gave a keynote presentation in the inaugural session—Evolution of animal production in Africa and other emerging markets—on behalf of ILRI’s director general, Jimmy Smith.

Key messages delivered by ILRI’s Pezo
• In 2030, demand for animal-source foods in sub-Saharan Africa will double that of 2000
• While monogastric production (pigs and poultry) in Africa is in rapid transition to industrial systems, at least 30% of pig production will remain in smallholder hands by 2015
• Smallholder mixed crop-and-livestock farmers are competitive:
> 90% of pig production in Uganda is made by smallholders (there are great opportunities for increasing pig productivity if diseases such as Africa swine fever are better controlled and farmers gain better access to technology and market information)
> 1 million smallholders in Kenya keep Africa’s largest dairy herd

ILRI’s Emily Ouma, agriculture economist, and Michel Dione, post-doctoral fellow in animal health–epidemiology, were discussants in ALiCE2014 sessions on ‘Livestock Industry Sector Policies and Economics’, and ‘Animal Health and Welfare’, respectively.

Vice president of Uganda Hon. Edward Ssekandi, right being handed ILRI's brochure by ILRI's Emily Ouma and Danilo Pezo at the ILRI exhibit

Emily Ouma and Danilo Pezo talk to the Ugandan Vice-President Edward Ssekandi at ILRI’s exhibit at ALiCE2014 (photo credit: ILRI).

Ugandan Vice-President Ssekandi and Minister of State for Animal Industry Rwamirama heard about ILRI’s work, particularly two Uganda projects− Smallholder Pig Value Chains Development in Uganda (SPVCD) and Safe Food Fair Food (SFFF) − at ILRI’s exhibition stand. ILRI’s exhibit provided information on other work done by ILRI in different livestock systems and value chains in Africa. Information on multi-institutional CGIAR research programs that ILRI and its partners are participating in was also highlighted. Visitors to ILRI’s exhibit stand included members of the media and farmer groups and general public; national and local government officers; researchers and lecturers from African universities; and representatives of financial institutions and private-sector companies..

ILRI’s Tony Brenton-Rule, head of business development, and Azage Tegegne, manager of the ILRI-led Livestock and Irrigation Value Chains for Ethiopian Smallholders project, also participated in ALICE 2014 and were at hand to answer questions from visitors to ILRI’s exhibit.

 


Filed under: Agri-Health, Animal Production, ASF, CRP37, CRP4, East Africa, Event report, Food Safety, FSZ, ILRI, ILRIComms, Integrated Sciences, Kenya, PA, Pigs, Uganda Tagged: ALiCE2014, Danilo Pezo, Emily Ouma, LIVES, Safe Food Fair Food, Uganda Minister of State for Animal Industry, Uganda Vice President

ILRI at the Africa Livestock Conference and Exhibition (ALiCE) 2014 Conference in Uganda

East Africa Clippings -

Hope Ruhindi Mwesigye, Minister of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries and Edward Ssekandi, Vice president of Uganda

ILRI at the 2014 African Livestock Conference and Exhibition (ALiCE2014): ILRI’s Danilo Pezo receives a gift in recognition of ILRI’s sponsorship role presented by Uganda Vice President Edward Ssekandi and Uganda Minister of State for Animal Industry Bright Rwamirama (photo credit: ILRI).

Article by Evelyn Katingi, communications officer for the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish.

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) participated actively in the African Livestock Conference and Exhibition (ALiCE2014), the theme of which was ‘Developing livestock value chains and improving livelihood in Africa‘, held at the Speke Resort & Conference Centre, in Kampala, Uganda, 18–20 June 2014.

Members of ILRI’s office in Uganda served on the conference’s hosting committee, which was led by Nicholas Kauta, director of Animal Resources of the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industries and Fisheries (MAAIF). The opening speech and inauguration of the conference were made by Edward Kiwanuka Ssekandi, vice president of Uganda, who was also the conference’s guest of honour.

Danilo Pezo, ILRI’s country representative in Uganda, gave a keynote presentation in the inaugural session—Evolution of animal production in Africa and other emerging markets—on behalf of ILRI’s director general, Jimmy Smith.

Key messages delivered by ILRI’s Pezo
• In 2030, demand for animal-source foods in sub-Saharan Africa will double that of 2000
• While monogastric production (pigs and poultry) in Africa is in rapid transition to industrial systems, at least 30% of pig production will remain in smallholder hands by 2015
• Smallholder mixed crop-and-livestock farmers are competitive:
> 90% of pig production in Uganda is made by smallholders (there are great opportunities for increasing pig productivity if diseases such as Africa swine fever are better controlled and farmers gain better access to technology and market information)
> 1 million smallholders in Kenya keep Africa’s largest dairy herd

ILRI’s Emily Ouma, agriculture economist, and Michel Dione, post-doctoral fellow in animal health–epidemiology, were discussants in ALiCE2014 sessions on ‘Livestock Industry Sector Policies and Economics’, and ‘Animal Health and Welfare’, respectively.

Vice president of Uganda Hon. Edward Ssekandi, right being handed ILRI's brochure by ILRI's Emily Ouma and Danilo Pezo at the ILRI exhibit

Emily Ouma and Danilo Pezo talk to the Ugandan Vice-President Edward Ssekandi at ILRI’s exhibit at ALiCE2014 (photo credit: ILRI).

Ugandan Vice-President Ssekandi and Minister of State for Animal Industry Rwamirama heard about ILRI’s work, particularly two Uganda projects− Smallholder Pig Value Chains Development in Uganda (SPVCD) and Safe Food Fair Food (SFFF) − at ILRI’s exhibition stand. ILRI’s exhibit provided information on other work done by ILRI in different livestock systems and value chains in Africa. Information on multi-institutional CGIAR research programs that ILRI and its partners are participating in was also highlighted. Visitors to ILRI’s exhibit stand included members of the media and farmer groups and general public; national and local government officers; researchers and lecturers from African universities; and representatives of financial institutions and private-sector companies..

ILRI’s Tony Brenton-Rule, head of business development, and Azage Tegegne, manager of the ILRI-led Livestock and Irrigation Value Chains for Ethiopian Smallholders project, also participated in ALICE 2014 and were at hand to answer questions from visitors to ILRI’s exhibit.

 


Filed under: Agri-Health, Animal Production, ASF, CRP37, CRP4, East Africa, Event report, Food Safety, FSZ, ILRI, ILRIComms, Integrated Sciences, Kenya, PA, Pigs, Uganda Tagged: ALiCE2014, Danilo Pezo, Emily Ouma, LIVES, Safe Food Fair Food, Uganda Minister of State for Animal Industry, Uganda Vice President

ILRI at the Africa Livestock Conference and Exhibition (ALiCE) 2014 Conference in Uganda

Clippings -

Hope Ruhindi Mwesigye, Minister of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries and Edward Ssekandi, Vice president of Uganda

ILRI at the 2014 African Livestock Conference and Exhibition (ALiCE2014): ILRI’s Danilo Pezo receives a gift in recognition of ILRI’s sponsorship role presented by Uganda Vice President Edward Ssekandi and Uganda Minister of State for Animal Industry Bright Rwamirama (photo credit: ILRI).

Article by Evelyn Katingi, communications officer for the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish.

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) participated actively in the African Livestock Conference and Exhibition (ALiCE2014), the theme of which was ‘Developing livestock value chains and improving livelihood in Africa‘, held at the Speke Resort & Conference Centre, in Kampala, Uganda, 18–20 June 2014.

Members of ILRI’s office in Uganda served on the conference’s hosting committee, which was led by Nicholas Kauta, director of Animal Resources of the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industries and Fisheries (MAAIF). The opening speech and inauguration of the conference were made by Edward Kiwanuka Ssekandi, vice president of Uganda, who was also the conference’s guest of honour.

Danilo Pezo, ILRI’s country representative in Uganda, gave a keynote presentation in the inaugural session—Evolution of animal production in Africa and other emerging markets—on behalf of ILRI’s director general, Jimmy Smith.

Key messages delivered by ILRI’s Pezo
• In 2030, demand for animal-source foods in sub-Saharan Africa will double that of 2000
• While monogastric production (pigs and poultry) in Africa is in rapid transition to industrial systems, at least 30% of pig production will remain in smallholder hands by 2015
• Smallholder mixed crop-and-livestock farmers are competitive:
> 90% of pig production in Uganda is made by smallholders (there are great opportunities for increasing pig productivity if diseases such as Africa swine fever are better controlled and farmers gain better access to technology and market information)
> 1 million smallholders in Kenya keep Africa’s largest dairy herd

ILRI’s Emily Ouma, agriculture economist, and Michel Dione, post-doctoral fellow in animal health–epidemiology, were discussants in ALiCE2014 sessions on ‘Livestock Industry Sector Policies and Economics’, and ‘Animal Health and Welfare’, respectively.

Vice president of Uganda Hon. Edward Ssekandi, right being handed ILRI's brochure by ILRI's Emily Ouma and Danilo Pezo at the ILRI exhibit

Emily Ouma and Danilo Pezo talk to the Ugandan Vice-President Edward Ssekandi at ILRI’s exhibit at ALiCE2014 (photo credit: ILRI).

Ugandan Vice-President Ssekandi and Minister of State for Animal Industry Rwamirama heard about ILRI’s work, particularly two Uganda projects− Smallholder Pig Value Chains Development in Uganda (SPVCD) and Safe Food Fair Food (SFFF) − at ILRI’s exhibition stand. ILRI’s exhibit provided information on other work done by ILRI in different livestock systems and value chains in Africa. Information on multi-institutional CGIAR research programs that ILRI and its partners are participating in was also highlighted. Visitors to ILRI’s exhibit stand included members of the media and farmer groups and general public; national and local government officers; researchers and lecturers from African universities; and representatives of financial institutions and private-sector companies..

ILRI’s Tony Brenton-Rule, head of business development, and Azage Tegegne, manager of the ILRI-led Livestock and Irrigation Value Chains for Ethiopian Smallholders project, also participated in ALICE 2014 and were at hand to answer questions from visitors to ILRI’s exhibit.

 


Filed under: Agri-Health, Animal Production, ASF, CRP37, CRP4, East Africa, Event report, Food Safety, FSZ, ILRI, ILRIComms, Integrated Sciences, Kenya, PA, Pigs, Uganda Tagged: ALiCE2014, Danilo Pezo, Emily Ouma, LIVES, Safe Food Fair Food, Uganda Minister of State for Animal Industry, Uganda Vice President

What do we need to know to make Climate-Smart Agriculture a reality?

CRP 7 News -

In the context of increased challenges to global agriculture and food security due to climate change, Climate-Smart Agriculture (CSA) is gaining acceptance as a way for the sector to adapt to the impacts of climate change, increase productivity, and reduce/remove greenhouse gas emissions. The emerging Global Alliance for Climate-Smart Agriculture endeavours to bring together diverse stakeholders including Governments, farmers, private sector, civil society organizations, and the research community to work towards successful implementation of Climate-Smart Agriculture.

Knowledge for CSA

For the effective roll-out of CSA at a meaningful scale, it is crucial that implementing entities have at their fingertips a strong evidence base and a range of solutions which can be applied in various contexts. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the CGIAR research program for Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security (CCAFS) have joined to form a Knowledge Action Group for Climate-Smart Agriculture, which endeavours to support members of the future Alliance by identifying and filling knowledge gaps which hinder adoption of CSA practices. In order to identify the knowledge gaps and priorities in a participatory manner, FAO and CCAFS conducted an extensive global survey. The initial set of results from the survey, identified knowledge priorities to be:

  • Technical interventions and practices in CSA
  • Support, services and extension for CSA
  • Evidence base of CSA
  • Inclusive knowledge systems for CSA
  • Integrated planning and monitoring for CSA

These priorities will guide future research activities in the CSA domain.

Global vs Regional Priorities

While it is valuable to identify global knowledge priorities and needs, CSA is highly context-specific in terms of implementation. Therefore, knowledge priorities and needs may also differ according to the context. In consideration of this, FAO and CCAFS jointly organized a consultation with key stakeholders in Asia at the recent consultative meeting of the Global Alliance for Climate-Smart Agriculture in Hanoi, Vietnam. The session aimed to identify key knowledge priorities for Asia, and map out differences in relation to global priorities.

Speaker at the consultative meeting of the Global Alliance for Climate-Smart Agriculture

At the session, CCAFS Regional Program Leader for Southeast Asia, Leocadio Sebastian pointed out that in Asia, various countries are at different levels of vulnerability. In Southeast Asia, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Lao PDR are among the most vulnerable countries, and therefore activities in the region need to address country specific vulnerabilities. (Powerpoint presentation on R4D Collaboration on Climate Change in Southeast Asia)

Sebastian also noted that other countries in the region too were faced with specific challenges related to climate change. For instance, in Indonesia, there is a need to mitigate the impact of oil palm as a driver of deforestation. In the Philippines, sea level rise is the pressing issue. These examples highlight how actions at regional, subregional, and country-levels need to be context specific.  However, in the region as a whole, climate variability, sea-level rise, and greenhouse gas emissions are of major importance. In addressing these issues, the regional knowledge priorities were similar to the global ones. However, the order of ranking differed in the region, pointing towards the diversity in the region.

Research institutions and extension services charged with generating knowledge which is context-specific and demand-oriented, can benefit from interaction and exchange, so that they can collectively address knowledge gaps in the region, and avoid fragmentation of efforts. Regional and country-level institutions also play a key role and their work should be complimentary to the efforts of international organizations. Participants also highlighted the need for greater clarity on the conceptual framework of CSA, the need for a farmer-focused approach, and the need for cost benefit analyses to empower farmer decisions-making, as additional factors to be considered in the region.

CCAFS researchers, government extension agents, development partners, are testing a variety of promising farming practices that could improve adaptation to and mitigate climatic changes, and manage risks associated with climate change. Photo: S. Kilungu (CCAFS)

The role of CGIAR and CCAFS

CGIAR is playing a prominent role in contributing to the knowledge base for CSA, this includes efforts through its Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) research program, a 10-year strategic research partnership with Future Earth, which brings together the world’s leading scientists on climate science, agricultural science, development research and earth system science. The program’s primary concern is to identify and address the most important interactions, synergies and trade-offs among climate change, agriculture and food security.

In addition to efforts through CCAFS, CGIAR plans to align its research agenda to support the implementation of CSA. This will include: (1) partnerships to deliver ambitious targets by forging partnerships with development agencies on food and nutritional security, and adaptation to and mitigation of climate change; (2) research for impact by undertaking activities needed to ensure that the targets are achieved. This will include action and policy research to deliver short-term outcomes, on the one hand, and longer term breeding programs to have climate-ready crops, livestock and fish, on the other hand; and (3) allocating a substantial amount  of  the CGIAR’s annual budget to research for development for CSA. These efforts demonstrate the solid commitment of the CGIAR Consortium in general, and CCAFS in particular, to the Global Alliance for CSA.

Read more from the CSA meeting in Hanoi: Getting climate-smart talk on the top agenda

Further resources:

www.casavaviet.blogspot.com

www.climatesmartagriculture.org/en/

Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) Conference focuses on growth, trade in Africa

CRP 2: program news -

The following is a slightly modified version of a story that was originally published on IFPRI’s Food Security Portal. Cross-posted from IFPRI Blogs.

GTAP Conf 2014

Source: GTAP/Purdue University

The last ten years have witnessed incredible economic and agricultural growth in Africa. Between 2000 and 2010, the continent was home to six of the ten fastest-growing economies in the world.

However, can this growth continue in a sustainable, inclusive way?

Yes, if managed carefully through strategic investments in infrastructure and stable financial institutions, according to Njuguna Ndung’u, Governor of the Central Bank of Kenya, who spoke at the 17th Annual Conference on Global Economic Analys. The conference, co-organized by the Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) and the African Growth and Development Modeling Consortium (AGRODEP), and held from June 18-20 in Dakar, Senegal, brought together 194 economists from 52 countries to discuss issues of food policy, trade, and economic vulnerability, with a particular focus on Africa.  In addition to Governor Ndung’u, plenary speakers included Ousmane Badiane, IFPRI’s Director for Africa. Researchers from IFPRI’s Markets, Trade and Institutions Division presented an organized session on food security and international trade, and IFPRI was further represented by presenters from the Development, Strategy and Governance Division, as well as from the West and and Central Africa Office.

Given the event’s emphasis on issues impacting Africa, one of the conference organizers’ biggest goals was strong representation from the continent’s scholars. “From the beginning, we recognized the importance of connecting African researchers to this credible, high-quality international research network,” said Antoine Bouet of MTID. This emphasis paid off, with 50 participants coming from across Africa. Forty of them received scholarships to attend from the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA), the World Trade Organization (WTO), AGRODEP, and IFPRI’s Food Security Portal. This marks the first time that economists from developing countries have been provided with financial assistance to attend GTAP’s annual conference.

“The conference was truly a big moment for AGRODEP and a clear demonstration of GTAP’s commitment to partnership with the African scientific community,” Badiane commented. “We will work hard to maintain a similar level of participation in the future.”

GTAP is a global network of researchers and policymakers who conduct quantitative analysis of international policy issues. Previous conferences have been hosted by the World Trade Organization (WTO), United Nations regional commissions in Africa, Latin America and Asia, the United Nations University in Helsinki, and World Bank Headquarters, according to GTAP president Thomas Hertel. This year’s conference, which was sponsored and supported by the CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions and Markets (PIM), IFPRI’s Food Security Portal, UNECA, the World Bank, and the WTO, was the first such conference to be held in Africa.

Given the event’s emphasis on issues impacting Africa, one of the conference organizers’ biggest goals was strong representation from the continent’s scholars. “From the beginning, we recognized the importance of connecting African researchers to this credible, high-quality international research network,” said Antoine Bouet of MTID. This emphasis paid off, with 50 participants coming from across Africa. Forty of them received scholarships to attend from the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA), the World Trade Organization (WTO), AGRODEP, and IFPRI’s Food Security Portal. This marks the first time that economists from developing countries have been provided with financial assistance to attend GTAP’s annual conference.

“The conference was truly a big moment for AGRODEP and a clear demonstration of GTAP’s commitment to partnership with the African scientific community,” Badiane commented. “We will work hard to maintain a similar level of participation in the future.”

GTAP is a global network of researchers and policymakers who conduct quantitative analysis of international policy issues. Previous conferences have been hosted by the World Trade Organization (WTO), United Nations regional commissions in Africa, Latin America and Asia, the United Nations University in Helsinki, and World Bank Headquarters, according to GTAP president Thomas Hertel. This year’s conference, which was sponsored and supported by the CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM), IFPRI’s Food Security Portal, UNECA, the World Bank, and the WTO, was the first such conference to be held in Africa.

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