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PIM Newsletter: April – June 2016

CRP 2: program news -

An overview of our news over the last three months, including the traditional PIM Director's note, stories from the blogs of our partners, some great insights from the EnGendering Data blog, calendar of upcoming events, and a long list of recent publications.

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Easing bottlenecks to uptake of dairy farming in western Kenya

Gender and Agriculture News -

ILRI Clippings

The western region of Kenya is not a traditional dairy production area, albeit having substantial resources that can support dairying. The region has, in the past, been left out of most dairy development initiatives in the country and its potential to contribute to the dairy sector, which accounts for 8% of Kenya’s GDP, is yet to be fully exploited.

Through the recently launched Feed the Future Kenya Accelerating Value Chain Development (AVCD) program, the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) is partnering with county governments and other actors to promote dairy production in western Kenya. The dairy value chain component of the AVCD program seeks to improve milk production, productivity and availability at household level across six counties—Busia, Homa Bay, Kisumu, Migori, Siaya and Vihiga—in the region.

A new project seeks to enhance dairy productivity for improved livelihoods of livestock keepers in western Kenya.

Since its inception at the start of 2016, AVCD…

View original post 491 more words


Filed under: Africa, Dairying, East Africa, Kenya, LGI, Project, Value Chains

Balancing the plate: Jimmy Smith opens ‘Private Sector Mechanism Partnerships Forum on Livestock’

Spotlight from ILRI news -

Private-Sector Mechanism Partnerships Forum on Livestock
30 June 2016, International Fund for Agricultural Research
Luncheon on the ‘Zero Hunger Challenge’

Keynote address
Balancing the Plate

By Jimmy Smith, Director General
International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

the-role-of-livestock-in-achieving-the-sdgs-23-638

Will livestock help us address Agenda 2030, in particular the Zero Hunger Challenge?

I’m here to make the case that we have a golden and rare opportunity to ensure that livestock are viewed not as a problem to be fixed but as part of many solutions to many global problems. I’m going to argue that livestock are powerful, if as yet underused, instruments for leveraging the systemic changes we need both to end hunger and to create sustainable food systems globally.

Balancing the plate
As we’ve just sat down to this fine meal, let’s start with how we can ‘balance the plate’. Can we manage to reduce the over-consumption of meat, eggs and dairy products that’s harming human health and the environment while also increasing under-consumption of these nutritionally dense foods by one billion of the world’s poorest people, thereby improving the nutrition and health of the latter?

In a word, yes.

I’m going to focus here on the big opportunity for the latter. As you know, one reason the livestock sector can play such a big role in sustainable development is that the skyrocketing demand for livestock products is taking place almost entirely in poor countries and emerging economies, where, of course, development of all kinds, particularly in meeting the ‘Zero Hunger Challenge’, remains paramount.

Let’s review the astonishing predictions of global livestock growth brought about by the rising populations, incomes and urbanization in poorer countries and emerging economies. This is where all the action is. In just 45 years, from 2005 to 2050, the world’s dairy requirement is expected to double, reaching almost 1 billion tonnes per year, with some 65% of that demand occurring in low- and middle-income countries. Demand for meat will also rise, nearly doubling from 258 to some 450 million tonnes each year, with over 70% of that demand occurring in these same developing and emerging economies. Demand for monogastric foods—pork, poultry meat and eggs—will rise at least four-fold, again mostly in developing countries.

Large inequities, however, will remain. In spite of good progress in nutritional security in recent years, undernutrition today continues to reduce global GDP by a stunning US$1.4–2.1 trillion a year, stunting 159 million children (IFPRI 2016). And while total global demand for livestock will continue to rise, the per capita consumption of meat in low-income countries will continue to average just one-third that of consumption in the USA.

the-role-of-livestock-in-achieving-the-sdgs-24-638

Balancing the messages
Thus, to bring about more balanced food plates, we’re going to have to do more than enhance small-scale livestock productivity. We’re going to have to also balance the public messages about this sector that so regularly become damning headlines in major media. We’re going to have to persuade Western publics and donors and decision-makers that while ‘livestock bads’ are real and must be addressed, and while the health and nourishment of all the world’s people matter, there is simply no moral equivalence between those who make poor food choices and those who have no food choices at all, between those who over-consume livestock-source foods and those who can afford no livestock-source foods at all.

This is not a zero-sum game. Sustainable development is a goal for all countries today, whether rich or poor, and whether service- or industrial- or agriculture-based. Today’s livestock researchers are delivering options for sustainable livestock systems of all kinds, operating in all circumstances and in all countries.

cgiar-research-program-on-agriculture-for-improved-nutrition-and-health-14-638

Balancing the partnerships
Let me now mention a third balance that we need to effect. This is arguably the most important. This is balanced partnerships—partnerships between publicly funded not-for-profit organizations such as my mine and the private for-profit companies in livestock, agricultural and related fields such as those represented in this room.

With the market value of Africa’s animal-source foods in 2050 estimated at USD151 billion, it will not have escaped those of you representing the private sector that the on-going livestock revolution in Africa and other regions of the developing world presents significant opportunities for private-sector investment, whether that be (first opportunity) investing in production of livestock products in Europe, North America or Australasia for export to Africa and Asia or (second opportunity) investing in new ventures to establish major livestock production units in the developing regions.

Perhaps an even greater investment opportunity for the private sector is the provision of livestock inputs and services for the plethora of small- to medium-scale livestock operations that characterize livestock systems in today’s developing and emerging economies. This would not only meet a significant market need but also enable livestock enterprises to become a major player in meeting the Sustainable Development Goals. This (third opportunity) is the opportunity to begin partnering with the nearly one billion smallholders whose livelihoods—as well as income, food, jobs, fertilizer, traction and insurance—depend on livestock.

Not all of today’s livestock smallholders will become efficient, market-linked producers or involve themselves in processing and trading animal products. Many will leave the sector altogether. Over time, it’s expected that most of today’s smallholders will be replaced by larger, more efficient livestock operations (with transitions in poultry and pig units occurring faster than those in the dairy sector). These millions of people and livestock systems in big transition over the coming decades offer companies business opportunities not to be missed.

Meeting the growing demand of the growing developing-world’s populations for meat, milk and eggs will require big on-going changes in how today’s smallholders produce and market their livestock products. The private sector can help guide these transitions so that they not only become profitable for all but also serve to enhance livelihoods and food and nutritional security; to ensure food is safe to consume; to provide employment for women, youth and other unskilled labour; and to protect the natural resource base.

About a third of today’s smallholders are already in the process of commercializing their livestock operations, which means they’re already customers for the right private-sector inputs and services. Another third may live in regions too distant from markets to take advantage of private-sector services, although there are exceptions, which I’ll get to in a minute. The last third of today’s smallholders could move in either of these two directions, becoming commercially viable livestock producers or exiting the livestock sector altogether. For this last group, public investments will be key in helping people shift their production systems from subsistence- to market-oriented, whereupon, of course, they would likely become customers of appropriate private-sector inputs and services.

What the public sector offers the private sector are the initial research and development investments, such as the development of new vaccines or diagnostics, that lay the groundwork for further investment and engagement by private companies. Working together productively and efficiently, public-private partnerships can pay off handsomely, helping next-generation livestock entrepreneurs build and expand vibrant local, regional and international markets. Such public-private partnerships can provide the company’s stakeholders with a profitable bottom line while also fulfilling on the company’s social corporate responsibility and the public organization’s ‘public good’ mandate.

I must now include a caveat, which is that the small-scale livestock systems so ubiquitous in the developing world are very different ‘beasts’ from the large-scale livestock operations private companies are accustomed to dealing with in the developed world and in the emerging economies of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. Agricultural business models employed today in the North cannot be directly transferred to the South. New business models suiting smallholders need to be jointly innovated, tested, refined and applied. Working together and combining our different areas of expertise, those of us in local, public and private organizations have the chance to build new models of great practical use by smallholders ambitious to build viable livestock businesses. At the same time, we also have the chance to help steer the fast-evolving smallholder livestock systems of developing countries in healthy, equitable and sustainable directions.

livestock-opportunities-for-addressing-global-development-challenges-9-638

Examples of pubic-private-partnerships at ILRI
How specifically can the private sector help bring this about? Let me end by telling you of a few of the ways we’re working with the private sector at ILRI.

Livestock vaccines
ILRI is working with Harris Vaccines Inc to test its proprietary vaccine technology for East Coast fever and with Senova GmbH to develop a lateral flow diagnostic test for contagious bovine pleuro-pneumonia. We’re working with Hester Biosciences Ltd to improve development of a thermostable vaccine against peste des petits ruminants. This veterinary vaccine company with R&D units, production sites, distributors and diagnostic labs in India is interested in developing Africa as a market for small-scale poultry and other livestock vaccines. New livestock vaccines should help reduce the need for drug treatments, whose mis- or overuse is leading to antimicrobial resistance. Disease reduces global livestock productivity by 25%—valued at USD300 billion per year—and costs Africa USD9–35 billion per year. ILRI has estimated that an annual global investment of USD25 billion in One Health approaches could save as much as USD100 billion annually in disease costs.

Livestock feeds
Production and sales of combined and processed feeds is emerging as a small- to medium-scale industry in some parts of the developing world, such as in India, where smallholder producers dominate the dairy sector. Better livestock feeding not only improves the productivity of livestock but also reduces the amount of greenhouse gases livestock emit as they digest their feed. ILRI has worked with the animal feed company Novus International to develop livestock feed supplements (starter pellets and molasses blocks) designed specifically for use by African smallholders. We’re working with the Kenya Cereal Millers Association, which has over ten million customers, to reduce the risk of Kenya’s consumers to exposure to high levels of carcinogenic aflatoxins in maize flour; a related group is investigating the use of contaminated cereals as livestock feeds.

Livestock insurance
We’re working with private insurance and reassurance companies to provide index-based livestock insurance to poor and never-before-insured remote livestock herders in Africa to protect them against catastrophic drought. Because insuring animals moving across vast landscapes is impossible, the team uses satellite data to assess the health of rangeland vegetation. When feed availability falls below a certain level, it triggers an insurance pay out. Insurance policies can be bought for any number of animals. Aid agencies can invest in (or subsidize) this insurance rather than investing in more costly and unpredictable emergency responses to severe drought. Preliminary results indicate that those insured were less likely to sell their animals in distress sales (36%), to reduce their meal intakes (25%) and to depend on food aid (33%).

food-security-and-animal-productionwhat-does-the-future-hold-27-638

Conclusions
At my institute, we’ve found that working closely with people and organizations with very different mindsets and modus operandi, while often challenging, can also be highly productive and rewarding. Having to learn the language of different organizations, and to modify our thinking and behaviour accordingly, has stretched us, encouraged us to think big and outside the box, to take risks we wouldn’t normally take.

The huge appetite growing in the developing world for meat, dairy and eggs is unprecedented; it’s not going to remain ignored for long by the private sector. Where there is such growth, private companies will jump in. I’ve said that this moment offers companies great opportunities to extend their markets, often accompanied by opportunities to fulfil their corporate social responsibilities. I’ve argued that by working together, private, public and civil society organizations can help rebalance global livestock diets, global views of livestock and global livestock partnerships. I invite all of us in this room to work together to find better ways of serving the world’s pastoralists, commercial grazers, mixed crop-livestock farmers and intensive livestock producers, ensuring that they are not left behind, but become part of the world’s sustainable as well as profitable livestock futures.

So, can we achieve balance? Can we meet the demand for animal-source foods while addressing Agenda 2030? Yes, I believe we can. We have a unique opportunity to grasp right now. Can the private sector do this alone? No. Can we do this without the private sector? No. This kind of accomplishment can be achieved only by making the (collective) whole greater than the sum of the (individual) parts. And to manage that, we’re going to need all the balanced food plates, messages and partnerships we can get.

Thank you for your kind attention.


Balancing the plate: Jimmy Smith opens ‘Private Sector Mechanism Partnerships Forum on Livestock’

News from ILRI -

Private-Sector Mechanism Partnerships Forum on Livestock
30 June 2016, International Fund for Agricultural Research
Luncheon on the ‘Zero Hunger Challenge’

Keynote address
Balancing the Plate

By Jimmy Smith, Director General
International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

the-role-of-livestock-in-achieving-the-sdgs-23-638

Will livestock help us address Agenda 2030, in particular the Zero Hunger Challenge?

I’m here to make the case that we have a golden and rare opportunity to ensure that livestock are viewed not as a problem to be fixed but as part of many solutions to many global problems. I’m going to argue that livestock are powerful, if as yet underused, instruments for leveraging the systemic changes we need both to end hunger and to create sustainable food systems globally.

Balancing the plate
As we’ve just sat down to this fine meal, let’s start with how we can ‘balance the plate’. Can we manage to reduce the over-consumption of meat, eggs and dairy products that’s harming human health and the environment while also increasing under-consumption of these nutritionally dense foods by one billion of the world’s poorest people, thereby improving the nutrition and health of the latter?

In a word, yes.

I’m going to focus here on the big opportunity for the latter. As you know, one reason the livestock sector can play such a big role in sustainable development is that the skyrocketing demand for livestock products is taking place almost entirely in poor countries and emerging economies, where, of course, development of all kinds, particularly in meeting the ‘Zero Hunger Challenge’, remains paramount.

Let’s review the astonishing predictions of global livestock growth brought about by the rising populations, incomes and urbanization in poorer countries and emerging economies. This is where all the action is. In just 45 years, from 2005 to 2050, the world’s dairy requirement is expected to double, reaching almost 1 billion tonnes per year, with some 65% of that demand occurring in low- and middle-income countries. Demand for meat will also rise, nearly doubling from 258 to some 450 million tonnes each year, with over 70% of that demand occurring in these same developing and emerging economies. Demand for monogastric foods—pork, poultry meat and eggs—will rise at least four-fold, again mostly in developing countries.

Large inequities, however, will remain. In spite of good progress in nutritional security in recent years, undernutrition today continues to reduce global GDP by a stunning US$1.4–2.1 trillion a year, stunting 159 million children (IFPRI 2016). And while total global demand for livestock will continue to rise, the per capita consumption of meat in low-income countries will continue to average just one-third that of consumption in the USA.

the-role-of-livestock-in-achieving-the-sdgs-24-638

Balancing the messages
Thus, to bring about more balanced food plates, we’re going to have to do more than enhance small-scale livestock productivity. We’re going to have to also balance the public messages about this sector that so regularly become damning headlines in major media. We’re going to have to persuade Western publics and donors and decision-makers that while ‘livestock bads’ are real and must be addressed, and while the health and nourishment of all the world’s people matter, there is simply no moral equivalence between those who make poor food choices and those who have no food choices at all, between those who over-consume livestock-source foods and those who can afford no livestock-source foods at all.

This is not a zero-sum game. Sustainable development is a goal for all countries today, whether rich or poor, and whether service- or industrial- or agriculture-based. Today’s livestock researchers are delivering options for sustainable livestock systems of all kinds, operating in all circumstances and in all countries.

cgiar-research-program-on-agriculture-for-improved-nutrition-and-health-14-638

Balancing the partnerships
Let me now mention a third balance that we need to effect. This is arguably the most important. This is balanced partnerships—partnerships between publicly funded not-for-profit organizations such as my mine and the private for-profit companies in livestock, agricultural and related fields such as those represented in this room.

With the market value of Africa’s animal-source foods in 2050 estimated at USD151 billion, it will not have escaped those of you representing the private sector that the on-going livestock revolution in Africa and other regions of the developing world presents significant opportunities for private-sector investment, whether that be (first opportunity) investing in production of livestock products in Europe, North America or Australasia for export to Africa and Asia or (second opportunity) investing in new ventures to establish major livestock production units in the developing regions.

Perhaps an even greater investment opportunity for the private sector is the provision of livestock inputs and services for the plethora of small- to medium-scale livestock operations that characterize livestock systems in today’s developing and emerging economies. This would not only meet a significant market need but also enable livestock enterprises to become a major player in meeting the Sustainable Development Goals. This (third opportunity) is the opportunity to begin partnering with the nearly one billion smallholders whose livelihoods—as well as income, food, jobs, fertilizer, traction and insurance—depend on livestock.

Not all of today’s livestock smallholders will become efficient, market-linked producers or involve themselves in processing and trading animal products. Many will leave the sector altogether. Over time, it’s expected that most of today’s smallholders will be replaced by larger, more efficient livestock operations (with transitions in poultry and pig units occurring faster than those in the dairy sector). These millions of people and livestock systems in big transition over the coming decades offer companies business opportunities not to be missed.

Meeting the growing demand of the growing developing-world’s populations for meat, milk and eggs will require big on-going changes in how today’s smallholders produce and market their livestock products. The private sector can help guide these transitions so that they not only become profitable for all but also serve to enhance livelihoods and food and nutritional security; to ensure food is safe to consume; to provide employment for women, youth and other unskilled labour; and to protect the natural resource base.

About a third of today’s smallholders are already in the process of commercializing their livestock operations, which means they’re already customers for the right private-sector inputs and services. Another third may live in regions too distant from markets to take advantage of private-sector services, although there are exceptions, which I’ll get to in a minute. The last third of today’s smallholders could move in either of these two directions, becoming commercially viable livestock producers or exiting the livestock sector altogether. For this last group, public investments will be key in helping people shift their production systems from subsistence- to market-oriented, whereupon, of course, they would likely become customers of appropriate private-sector inputs and services.

What the public sector offers the private sector are the initial research and development investments, such as the development of new vaccines or diagnostics, that lay the groundwork for further investment and engagement by private companies. Working together productively and efficiently, public-private partnerships can pay off handsomely, helping next-generation livestock entrepreneurs build and expand vibrant local, regional and international markets. Such public-private partnerships can provide the company’s stakeholders with a profitable bottom line while also fulfilling on the company’s social corporate responsibility and the public organization’s ‘public good’ mandate.

I must now include a caveat, which is that the small-scale livestock systems so ubiquitous in the developing world are very different ‘beasts’ from the large-scale livestock operations private companies are accustomed to dealing with in the developed world and in the emerging economies of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. Agricultural business models employed today in the North cannot be directly transferred to the South. New business models suiting smallholders need to be jointly innovated, tested, refined and applied. Working together and combining our different areas of expertise, those of us in local, public and private organizations have the chance to build new models of great practical use by smallholders ambitious to build viable livestock businesses. At the same time, we also have the chance to help steer the fast-evolving smallholder livestock systems of developing countries in healthy, equitable and sustainable directions.

livestock-opportunities-for-addressing-global-development-challenges-9-638

Examples of pubic-private-partnerships at ILRI
How specifically can the private sector help bring this about? Let me end by telling you of a few of the ways we’re working with the private sector at ILRI.

Livestock vaccines
ILRI is working with Harris Vaccines Inc to test its proprietary vaccine technology for East Coast fever and with Senova GmbH to develop a lateral flow diagnostic test for contagious bovine pleuro-pneumonia. We’re working with Hester Biosciences Ltd to improve development of a thermostable vaccine against peste des petits ruminants. This veterinary vaccine company with R&D units, production sites, distributors and diagnostic labs in India is interested in developing Africa as a market for small-scale poultry and other livestock vaccines. New livestock vaccines should help reduce the need for drug treatments, whose mis- or overuse is leading to antimicrobial resistance. Disease reduces global livestock productivity by 25%—valued at USD300 billion per year—and costs Africa USD9–35 billion per year. ILRI has estimated that an annual global investment of USD25 billion in One Health approaches could save as much as USD100 billion annually in disease costs.

Livestock feeds
Production and sales of combined and processed feeds is emerging as a small- to medium-scale industry in some parts of the developing world, such as in India, where smallholder producers dominate the dairy sector. Better livestock feeding not only improves the productivity of livestock but also reduces the amount of greenhouse gases livestock emit as they digest their feed. ILRI has worked with the animal feed company Novus International to develop livestock feed supplements (starter pellets and molasses blocks) designed specifically for use by African smallholders. We’re working with the Kenya Cereal Millers Association, which has over ten million customers, to reduce the risk of Kenya’s consumers to exposure to high levels of carcinogenic aflatoxins in maize flour; a related group is investigating the use of contaminated cereals as livestock feeds.

Livestock insurance
We’re working with private insurance and reassurance companies to provide index-based livestock insurance to poor and never-before-insured remote livestock herders in Africa to protect them against catastrophic drought. Because insuring animals moving across vast landscapes is impossible, the team uses satellite data to assess the health of rangeland vegetation. When feed availability falls below a certain level, it triggers an insurance pay out. Insurance policies can be bought for any number of animals. Aid agencies can invest in (or subsidize) this insurance rather than investing in more costly and unpredictable emergency responses to severe drought. Preliminary results indicate that those insured were less likely to sell their animals in distress sales (36%), to reduce their meal intakes (25%) and to depend on food aid (33%).

food-security-and-animal-productionwhat-does-the-future-hold-27-638

Conclusions
At my institute, we’ve found that working closely with people and organizations with very different mindsets and modus operandi, while often challenging, can also be highly productive and rewarding. Having to learn the language of different organizations, and to modify our thinking and behaviour accordingly, has stretched us, encouraged us to think big and outside the box, to take risks we wouldn’t normally take.

The huge appetite growing in the developing world for meat, dairy and eggs is unprecedented; it’s not going to remain ignored for long by the private sector. Where there is such growth, private companies will jump in. I’ve said that this moment offers companies great opportunities to extend their markets, often accompanied by opportunities to fulfil their corporate social responsibilities. I’ve argued that by working together, private, public and civil society organizations can help rebalance global livestock diets, global views of livestock and global livestock partnerships. I invite all of us in this room to work together to find better ways of serving the world’s pastoralists, commercial grazers, mixed crop-livestock farmers and intensive livestock producers, ensuring that they are not left behind, but become part of the world’s sustainable as well as profitable livestock futures.

So, can we achieve balance? Can we meet the demand for animal-source foods while addressing Agenda 2030? Yes, I believe we can. We have a unique opportunity to grasp right now. Can the private sector do this alone? No. Can we do this without the private sector? No. This kind of accomplishment can be achieved only by making the (collective) whole greater than the sum of the (individual) parts. And to manage that, we’re going to need all the balanced food plates, messages and partnerships we can get.

Thank you for your kind attention.


Blackhead Removal – Can Blackheads Be Effectively Treated?

ILRI Poverty and Gender Group Outputs -

Yes, there are effective blackhead removal treatments, and you can begin the steps towards having clearer skin starting now! Truth is, any form of acne, especially blackheads, can be unsightly and the source of self-consciousness and embarrassment. Fortunately, you can empower yourself by understanding the cause of blackheads and deciding what removal method works best for you.

What are blackheads?

Blackheads, also known as comedones, are a direct cause of an acne problem. These unsightly blemishes form when a hair follicle is partially blocked by sebum and dead skin cells. Sebum, the body’s natural oil, is secreted in excess due to overactive sebaceous glands. The blackhead’s close relative, the whitehead, is also a comedone, but forms when the follicles are almost completely closed. The excessive production of sebum can be caused by a number of factors, including stress, hormonal changes, and reaction to the external environment.

Contrary to what some may believe, the black coloring of blackheads are not caused by dirt trapped in the pores or follicles. Incidentally, the color comes from melanin oxidation. When the follicles are open, melanin (skin pigmentation) gets exposed to air. When the melanin reacts to the oxygen in the air, the darkening of the comedone ensues.

Who can get blackheads?

Anyone can get blackheads, and most of us have had at least one blackhead in our lifetime. Most likely, anyone who has oily or combination skin is more vulnerable to getting blackheads. Also, improper removal of debris and makeup is also a recipe for blackhead disaster. Blackheads can affect both adults and teenagers, male and female. However, teenagers are generally more susceptible to blackheads due to the hormonal changes of the body, which may cause excessive oil production.

How can I get rid of blackheads?

The great news is that blackheads can be treated. The key to blackhead removal is keeping the skin clean and clear of oil and debris. You also will want to avoid squeezing blackheads with your fingernails as this can cause scarring and possibly further infection, leading to more severe form of acne known as cysts.

The purpose of this site is to explore the different options of prevention and removal of blackheads including topical treatments, medications, blackhead removal tools, diet, and natural home remedies. Please keep in mind that every body is different, and there is no one size fits all approach to treating blackheads. The content of this site is for informational purposes only; it is not a substitution for medical treatment, and it is not to be used as a diagnosis or prescription for any disease or condition.


New global partnership for sustainable groundwater management

CRP 5: Program news -

Groundwater use is soaring. Never before has as much groundwater been pumped for irrigation, industry, and urban development. Recent news reported that the Chinese capital of Beijing is sinking by 11cm annually due to over pumping, and an estimated 20 million people globally are currently at risk of experiencing groundwater scarcity.

Human pollution is also increasingly contributing to groundwater degradation, despite the fact that future climate change impacts are like to increase our dependence on groundwater resources. At the same time, groundwater in some regions remains plentiful.

The Groundwater Solutions Initiative for Policy and Practice (GRIPP) was recently launched in response to these challenges.

This global partnership, which is led by the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) and of which WLE is a member, seeks to advance the agenda of sustainable groundwater management at a global scale to contribute to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. If managed sustainably, groundwater resources have the potential to boost agricultural production, lift millions out of poverty as well as improve their health and nutrition.

GRIPP aims to strengthen, expand and connect current groundwater initiatives by forging new partnerships, sharing solutions, scaling-up successes and filling in knowledge gaps. In 2016, the initiative will be presented at several global events, including the upcoming Africa Water Week, and interested stakeholders are invited to join as new members.

Learn more at gripp.iwmi.org.

Vacancy: IWMI Deputy Director General (Research for Development)

CRP 5: Program news -

The International Water Management Institute (IWMI) seeks applications from highly motivated, visionary research leaders with exceptional capacity to successfully motivate, manage and lead teams of different disciplines and multiple cultures to deliver the Institute’s research outputs and development outcomes.

The Deputy Director General (Research for Development) will drive the research agenda within IWMI to address global development challenges for water security and natural resource management. This includes leading the identification of innovative research areas, ensuring relevance of thematic content for the development agenda and assuring excellence of research outputs.

IWMI research contributes to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), global climate agenda, and other national and regional initiatives. The DDG will be responsible and accountable for IWMI’s contributions to, and engagement in, the CGIAR Research Programs (CRPs), including the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems (WLE), which the Institute leads.

The DDG will play a key role in stimulating ideas and lines of investigation, synthesizing and communicating research findings to key stakeholders, including donors, identifying and guiding the scaling up and scaling out of research findings, profiling IWMI, networking and resource mobilization.

The successful candidate will play a vital role in the overall management and direction of IWMI, will be a member of the Institute’s Management Team (MT) and will head the Program Leadership Team (PLT). The DDG will also support IWMI’s Theme Leaders (TLs) and inter-theme collaboration.

Approximately 25% of the DDG’s time will be engaged in research projects as a lead or team member. The DDG will report to the Director General (DG), and will be based at IWMI’s headquarters in Colombo, Sri Lanka, or at one of the Institute’s major regional offices in Africa and Asia.

Download the full job description here.

Vacancy: IWMI Theme Leader for Water Availability, Risk and Resilience

CRP 5: Program news -

The International Water Management Institute (IWMI) seeks applications from highly motivated, visionary research leaders with exceptional capacity to successfully motivate, manage and lead its research theme on Water Availability, Risk and Resilience (WR).
The Theme Leader (TL) will direct IWMI’s research theme on Water Availability, Risk and Resilience (WR), provide advanced research-for-development leadership of the theme and the overall research strategy of the Institute. In addition, TL will ensure that IWMI delivers on its strategic commitments, contributes to the relevant CGIAR Research Programs (CRPs) and, where assigned, undertakes responsibilities for managing flagships and other components of these CRPs. TL will report to the Deputy Director General (Research for Development) (DDG), and will be based at IWMI’s headquarters in Colombo, Sri Lanka, or at one of the Institute’s major regional offices in Africa and Asia.

Water availability is a key constraint to poverty reduction and food security. The starting point for sustainable water resources management and all water-use activities in any basin is to know how much water is available for various uses, the source of this water (rivers, lakes, aquifers or soil moisture), its interactions with land and livelihoods, and its variability in time and space. Variability of water resources is a major natural impediment for sustainable agriculture, food production and development at large, and is the primary determinant of water scarcity and a significant factor in ensuring national water security. Extremes of variability – floods and droughts – are the primary agents of destruction, severe crop damage and loss of human life. Variability is increasing with climate change, and hence it has to be explicitly accounted for in climate change adaptation strategies.

This research theme aims to advance data and knowledge on groundwater and surface water processes, availability and variability for various uses across scales, and on the drivers of change to provide solutions that minimize flood- and drought-related risks, improve preparedness and maximize the resilience of farmers and nations to such natural disasters; to enhance the adaptive capacity of communities, nations and economic sectors to progressing climate change and increasing water variability; and to guide environmentally sound and socially acceptable development and operation of various forms and scales of water storage.

The theme is the key contributor to the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems (WLE) Flagship on Managing Resource Variability, Risks and Competing Uses for Increased Resilience (VCR), and to the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS).

View the full job description here.

IWMI Deputy Director General (Research for Development)

CRP 5: Program news -

The International Water Management Institute (IWMI) seeks applications from highly motivated, visionary research leaders with exceptional capacity to successfully motivate, manage and lead teams of different disciplines and multiple cultures to deliver the Institute’s research outputs and development outcomes.

The Deputy Director General (Research for Development) will drive the research agenda within IWMI to address global development challenges for water security and natural resource management. This includes leading the identification of innovative research areas, ensuring relevance of thematic content for the development agenda and assuring excellence of research outputs.

IWMI research contributes to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), global climate agenda, and other national and regional initiatives. The DDG will be responsible and accountable for IWMI’s contributions to, and engagement in, the CGIAR Research Programs (CRPs), including the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems (WLE), which the Institute leads.

The DDG will play a key role in stimulating ideas and lines of investigation, synthesizing and communicating research findings to key stakeholders, including donors, identifying and guiding the scaling up and scaling out of research findings, profiling IWMI, networking and resource mobilization.

The successful candidate will play a vital role in the overall management and direction of IWMI, will be a member of the Institute’s Management Team (MT) and will head the Program Leadership Team (PLT). The DDG will also support IWMI’s Theme Leaders (TLs) and inter-theme collaboration.

Approximately 25% of the DDG’s time will be engaged in research projects as a lead or team member. The DDG will report to the Director General (DG), and will be based at IWMI’s headquarters in Colombo, Sri Lanka, or at one of the Institute’s major regional offices in Africa and Asia.

Download the full job description here.

IWMI Theme Leader: Water Availability, Risk and Resilience

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The International Water Management Institute (IWMI) seeks applications from highly motivated, visionary research leaders with exceptional capacity to successfully motivate, manage and lead its research theme on Water Availability, Risk and Resilience (WR).
The Theme Leader (TL) will direct IWMI’s research theme on Water Availability, Risk and Resilience (WR), provide advanced research-for-development leadership of the theme and the overall research strategy of the Institute. In addition, TL will ensure that IWMI delivers on its strategic commitments, contributes to the relevant CGIAR Research Programs (CRPs) and, where assigned, undertakes responsibilities for managing flagships and other components of these CRPs. TL will report to the Deputy Director General (Research for Development) (DDG), and will be based at IWMI’s headquarters in Colombo, Sri Lanka, or at one of the Institute’s major regional offices in Africa and Asia.

Water availability is a key constraint to poverty reduction and food security. The starting point for sustainable water resources management and all water-use activities in any basin is to know how much water is available for various uses, the source of this water (rivers, lakes, aquifers or soil moisture), its interactions with land and livelihoods, and its variability in time and space. Variability of water resources is a major natural impediment for sustainable agriculture, food production and development at large, and is the primary determinant of water scarcity and a significant factor in ensuring national water security. Extremes of variability – floods and droughts – are the primary agents of destruction, severe crop damage and loss of human life. Variability is increasing with climate change, and hence it has to be explicitly accounted for in climate change adaptation strategies.

This research theme aims to advance data and knowledge on groundwater and surface water processes, availability and variability for various uses across scales, and on the drivers of change to provide solutions that minimize flood- and drought-related risks, improve preparedness and maximize the resilience of farmers and nations to such natural disasters; to enhance the adaptive capacity of communities, nations and economic sectors to progressing climate change and increasing water variability; and to guide environmentally sound and socially acceptable development and operation of various forms and scales of water storage.

The theme is the key contributor to the CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems (WLE) Flagship on Managing Resource Variability, Risks and Competing Uses for Increased Resilience (VCR), and to the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS).

View the full job description here.

Livestock Matter(s): ILRI news ’round-up’ May-June 2016

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‘Livestock Matter(s)’ provides a round-up of livestock development news, publications, presentations, images and upcoming events from the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and its partners. Download a print version or sign up to get Livestock Matter(s) in your mailbox each month.

View the May–June 2016 issue of Livestock Matter(s) on Storify:

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Filed under: ILRI, ILRIComms, Livestock, Research Tagged: Livestock matters

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