CGIAR research program on livestock and fish

The vision of this CGIAR Research Program is for the health, livelihoods and future prospects of the poor and vulnerable, especially women and children, to be transformed through consumption of adeCGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish logoquate amounts of meat, milk and/or fish and from benefiting from the associated animal source food value chains.

 

 

It aims to realize this vision by seizing upon an unprecedented opportunity to integrate and exploit three ongoing revolutions – the Livestock Revolution, the Blue Revolution and the Gene Revolution. It will do this by fostering partnerships that harness the respective strengths of research and development partners, including the private sector, and also other relevant CRPs.

 

The Program will test the hypothesis that increased access to animal source foods by the poor, especially women and children, can be achieved at scale by strengthening carefully selected meat, milk and fish value chains in which the poor can capture a significant share of the benefits. Technologies and lessons generated through this focused approach will be applicable in broader regional and global settings.

 

It will concentrate its collective efforts on nine animal‐product value chains in eight countries, replacing our conventional approach of more piece‐meal research across scattered sites. This will allow us to integrate our research in a holistic manner to generate the solutions that will transform the selected value chains and produce more food.

 

 

Scientists at ILRI carried out a socioeconomic study, to answer several questions on the delivery of the CBPP vaccine in North Eastern Kenya. A recently published paper, based on the study findings, reports that gendered division of cattle associated roles and responsibilities has produced different and complementary types of knowledge on CBPP by women and men. Continue reading →

ILRI Livelihoods, Gender and Impact, Sep/2015

At a time when the price of mutton is climbing and wool crashing, a groundbreaking new study has used advanced genetic sequencing technology to rewrite the history of sheep breeding and trading along the ancient Silk Road—insights that can help contemporary herders in developing countries preserve or recover valuable traits crucial to their food and economic security. The new findings regarding one of the first animals ever domesticated will be published in the October print edition of the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution. They are the product of an unprecedented collaboration involving scientists in China, Iran, Pakistan, Indonesia, Nepal, Finland, and the United Kingdom. The team analysed the complete mitochondrial DNA of 42 domesticated native sheep breeds from Azerbaijan, Moldova, Serbia, Ukraine, Russia, Kazakhstan, Poland, Finland, China and the United Kingdom, along with two wild sheep species from Kazakhstan. ...

ILRI news blog, Sep/2015

Meet some of the Ugandan farmers involved in the Livestock and Fish program to catalyze emerging smallholder pig value chains to increase rural incomes and assets. Continue reading

Livestock and Fish, Aug/2015

A newly published article reports that increased workload from dairy intensification, especially in medium-intensity households could negatively impact women’s time use and affect caregiving activities and child nutrition. Continue reading →

ILRI Livelihoods, Gender and Impact, Aug/2015

Innovation platforms are widely used in agricultural research to connect different stakeholders to achieve common goals. This fourteenth brief reflects on ways that the needs and interests of women can be fully addresses in innovation platforms.
Continue reading

ILRI clippings, Aug/2015

In Uganda, the Livestock and Fish program aims to catalyze emerging smallholder pig value chains to increase rural incomes and assets. Continue reading

Livestock and Fish, Aug/2015

The first meeting of a new project, 'B3Africa, short for 'Bridging Biobanking and Biomedical Research across Europe and Africa', was held this week (24–25 Aug 2015) at the University of the Western Cape, in Cape Town, South Africa. Continue reading

ILRI news blog, Aug/2015

In a series of workshops, industry stakeholders in Tanzania recently gathered to map the location of dairy farming systems, prominent farms, dairy industry infrastructure and natural resources. Stakeholders then worked through scenarios of how the industry could develop over a 10 year time horizon – mapping the associated changes. Continue reading

Livestock and Fish, Aug/2015

Looking back – and across the whole program portfolio – we identified three main activity areas where the program worked in 2014. We also launched an important cross-cutting ‘gender initiative’ to help our researchers make their interventions gender-equitable. Continue reading

Livestock and Fish, Aug/2015

Innovation platforms are widely used in agricultural research to connect different stakeholders to achieve common goals. This thirteenth brief reflects on some of issues and opportunities faced when innovation platforms - or the innovations they generate - are scaled out. Continue reading

ILRI clippings, Aug/2015

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Absolomon Kihara
Biorepository Manager
Adie, Aberra
Research Assistant
Alan Orth
Computing Systems Analyst
Alessandra Galiè
Social Scientist: Gender
Alok Kumar
Post-Doctoral Scientist

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