emerging diseases

This page brings together ILRI and partner resources on emerging diseases. Click different tabs to see news items, research outputs, journal articles, video materials and presentations as well as ILRI projects and people related to emerging diseases. See ILRI research on other subjects

The first joint conference of the Association of Institutions for Tropical Veterinary Medicine and the Society of Tropical Veterinary Medicine takes place on 4-8 September 2016 in Berlin, Germany.

AgHealth, Feb/2016

With colleagues from the Jenner and Pirbright institutes in the UK, Nairobi's Strathmore University and institutions in Saudi Arabia and Spain, scientists and technicians in a vaccine biosciences program of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) in Nairobi, Kenya, have recently published a paper in Nature announcing a breakthrough in development of a 'One Health' vaccine that could protect both people and livestock from Rift Valley fever. Continue reading

ILRI news blog, Feb/2016

Joerg Jores, a molecular biologist at the Nairobi animal health laboratories of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) who is working to develop diagnostic assays and vaccines against livestock diseases caused by Mycoplasma mycoides is also investigating the epidemiology of MERS-CoV in camel populations in Kenya and participated in the recent FAO-hosted discussions. Continue reading

ILRI clippings, Feb/2016

A review paper in Trends in Parasitology (Jan 2016) examines the threat of microsporidia, a group of emerging foodborne parasites.

AgHealth, Jan/2016

One Health for the Real World: zoonoses, ecosystems and wellbeing
17–18 Mar 2016

This symposium will bring together leading experts from different fields to discuss the topic 'Healthy ecosystems, healthy people'. Continue reading

ILRI clippings, Jan/2016

African camels could hold important clues to controlling the potential spread of a respiratory disease transmitted by the animals. For many years African camels have lived with the disease and the risk of it spreading to humans is still low. But more research is necessary to understand the disease better. This is even more important given the confirmation that the chains of transmission of the human Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection originated from contact with camels. Continue reading

ILRI clippings, Jan/2016

'Members of communities that live in forests and depend on hunting for survival have been reported to be at risk because bush meat, widely used as their source of food, can be a source of deadly pathogens from wild animals to humans. The Arusha-based, Nelson Mandela University and the US Centre[s] for Disease Control have now entered into a project aimed at curbing the transmission of diseases from wild animals to human beings.' Continue reading

ILRI clippings, Jan/2016

A commentary published in The Lancet last month supporting a series of five papers on antimicrobials recommends prohibiting use of antibiotics critically important for human medicine to promote the growth of livestock or to prevent routine livestock disease. The commentary was written by Tim Robinson, a principal scientist in spatial analysis at the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), and colleagues in partner organizations. Continue reading

ILRI news blog, Dec/2015

The Urban Zoo project is visiting 99 households across Nairobi, rich and poor, with livestock and without. They’re taking samples from people, their animals, and whatever wildlife they can find nearby (and catch): storks, mice, bats, et cetera. They’re sampling the ground around homes, yards and livestock pens with white paper booties. 'The aim, says University of Liverpool veterinarian Judy Bettridge, is “to try and understand on a small scale how those bacteria are shared” among each household’s people, livestock and environment. “And then when we scale it up, are the bacteria here being shared with the household that’s 50 meters over there? Or 100 meters over there? So, how far can they actually spread?” . . . Continue reading ...

ILRI clippings, Dec/2015

Zoonoses—diseases transferred from animals to humans—have been with humanity throughout history. But today’s growing scale of livestock production in developing countries to feed their fast-growing and fast-urbanizing populations is sparking debate about whether the livestock sector is contributing to a fundamental a shift in global disease mortality, something known as an ‘epidemiological transition’. If so, it would be the third such transition in human history. Continue reading

ILRI news blog, Dec/2015

Pages

Barbara Wieland
Team Leader Herd Health
Barbara Wieland
Team Leader Herd Health
Eric Fevre
Professor of Veterinary Infectious Diseases, Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool
Hu Suk Lee
Post-doctoral scientist (veterinary epidemiologist)
Johanna Lindahl
Post doctoral scientist
Martin Wainaina
Research Assistant
Michel Mainack Dione
Animal Health Scientist

People working on emerging diseases

Barbara Wieland
Team Leader Herd Health
Barbara Wieland
Team Leader Herd Health
Eric Fevre
Professor of Veterinary Infectious Diseases, Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool
Hu Suk Lee
Post-doctoral scientist (veterinary epidemiologist)
Johanna Lindahl
Post doctoral scientist
Martin Wainaina
Research Assistant
Michel Mainack Dione
Animal Health Scientist