food safety

This page brings together ILRI and partner resources on food safety. Click different tabs to see news items, research outputs, journal articles, video materials and presentations as well as ILRI projects and people related to food safety. See ILRI research on other subjects

More than 6 out of 10 human infectious diseases are zoonotic (can be passed from animals to people). Southeast Asia is considered one of the hotspot areas for the emergence of zoonotic diseases. The rapid growth of economies and human populations have led to livestock intensification, land use changes and disruption in wildlife habitats, all […]

AgHealth, Apr/2014

‘The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) has commissioned a research project that will ascertain the levels of aflatoxins in the milk consumed in Kenya. ‘Kenyans consume more than 145 litres of milk per person annually increasing the risks associated with milk-related aflatoxins. Because of the higher milk consumption, especially by young children, pregnant and nursing … Continue reading

ILRI clippings, Apr/2014

A damaged maize cob that, if harvested with clean cobs, can contaminate all the cobs with aflatoxins (photo credit: Joseph Atehnkeng/IITA). ‘The UN World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that billions of people in the developing world are chronically exposed to aflatoxin, a natural poison on food crops which causes cancer, impairs the immune system, inhibits … Continue reading

ILRI clippings, Mar/2014

Uganda is the leading consumer of pork in sub-Saharan Africa, according to the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI). Over 2.3 million pigs are kept by one million households in Uganda for consumption, says the institute which further indicates that the majority of pigs are kept by women in smallholder households. Continue reading

ILRI clippings, Mar/2014

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) has commissioned research to ascertain the levels of aflatoxins in the milk consumed in Kenya. Studies say every Kenyan consumes over 145 litres annually-higher than other Africans – increasing the risk of milk-related aflatoxins. Continue reading

ILRI clippings, Mar/2014

Most dairy processing activities in Ethiopia focus on fresh milk, sold in raw, boiled or pasteurized forms to consumers. The unsold fresh milk is usually processed into fresh butter. Any remaining skimmed milk is either sold to consumers or is heated to get a soft cheese known as “ayeb”. In a milk bar in Mekelle town, the unsold fresh full milk is being naturally fermented into “irgo” (yoghurt). If we could increase demand for dairy products obtained from soured milk, then processors might buy sour in addition to fresh milk from producers. Continue reading http://stats.wordpress.com/b.gif?host=lives-ethiopia.org&blog=36031825...

LIVES, Apr/2014

‘The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) has commissioned a research project that will ascertain the levels of aflatoxins in the milk consumed in Kenya. ‘Kenyans consume more than 145 litres of milk per person annually increasing the risks associated with milk-related aflatoxins. Because of the higher milk consumption, especially by young children, pregnant and nursing … Continue reading

ILRI clippings, Apr/2014

A damaged maize cob that, if harvested with clean cobs, can contaminate all the cobs with aflatoxins (photo credit: Joseph Atehnkeng/IITA). ‘The UN World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that billions of people in the developing world are chronically exposed to aflatoxin, a natural poison on food crops which causes cancer, impairs the immune system, inhibits … Continue reading

ILRI clippings, Mar/2014

Uganda is the leading consumer of pork in sub-Saharan Africa, according to the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI). Over 2.3 million pigs are kept by one million households in Uganda for consumption, says the institute which further indicates that the majority of pigs are kept by women in smallholder households. Continue reading

ILRI clippings, Mar/2014

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) has commissioned research to ascertain the levels of aflatoxins in the milk consumed in Kenya. Studies say every Kenyan consumes over 145 litres annually-higher than other Africans – increasing the risk of milk-related aflatoxins. Continue reading

ILRI clippings, Mar/2014

Pages

Eric Fevre
Professor of Veterinary Infectious Diseases, Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool
Michel Mainack Dione
Post-doctoral Fellow Animal Health
Sara Ahlberg
Associate Professional Officer (JPO)
Tezira Lore
Communications Specialist

Photos

Australian Texel sheep at an experimental station at the Institute for Animal Science, in Beijing, China

People working on food safety

Eric Fevre
Professor of Veterinary Infectious Diseases, Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool
Michel Mainack Dione
Post-doctoral Fellow Animal Health
Sara Ahlberg
Associate Professional Officer (JPO)
Tezira Lore
Communications Specialist