vaccines

This page brings together ILRI and partner resources on vaccines. Click different tabs to see news items, research outputs, journal articles, video materials and presentations as well as ILRI projects and people related to vaccines. See ILRI research on other subjects

Since early 2016, AVCD dairy has been working to facilitate farmers’ awareness on the availability and access to ECF vaccines. ILRI has partnered with the county government to expand the distributional reach of the vaccine and improve vaccine delivery. Continue reading →
ILRI clippings, Jul/2016
East Coast fever (ECF) is a lymphoproliferative disease caused by the protozoan parasite Theileria parva. It kills about one million cattle annually in Africa. Four groups of 5 BoLA-typed animals were immunized with the T. parva Tp1 antigen with or without leader sequence in the HAd5 viral vector and boosted with the same antigens in the MVA vector. Most animals generated CTL to the known epitope measured using tetramer staining, ELISpot and Cr-51-release assay. The CTL expressed perforin and lysed peptide pulsed PBMC. CD4 cells were shown to proliferate to the antigen. Challenge of the animals resulted in about 30% protection. Continue reading →
Saving livestock with vaccines, Jul/2016
The parasite Theileria parva claims the life of approximately 1 million cattle every year. Immune animals to the parasite develop a lifelong immunity based on a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response with a strong immunodominance restricted by the bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules. In our goal of developing a next-generation vaccine against T. parva, we have undertaken to identify new CTL inducing antigens that can be included in a recombinant vaccine. A peptide library of 18-mer peptides overlapping by 12 amino acids and covering 500 genes of the whole parasite genome was synthesized; giving approximately 40,000 peptides aliquoted in pools of 50 peptides. Continue reading →
Saving livestock with vaccines, Jul/2016
East Coast fever (ECF) is a lymphoproliferative disease caused by the protozoan parasite Theileria parva. It kills about one million cattle annually in Africa. The sporozoite stage of this parasite, harbored in the salivary glands of the tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, invades and establishes infection in the bovine lymphocytes during tick feeding. However, little is known about the parasite molecules involved in this infection process. It is therefore necessary to elucidate the protein composition of the sporozoites to identify novel targets for blocking invasion. Blocking this initial stage of invasion presents a promising vaccine strategy for the control of ECF. Continue reading →
Saving livestock with vaccines, Jul/2016
AgResults announced the Brucellosis Vaccine Prize, a US $30 million prize challenge to incentivize animal health companies to develop a vaccine against Brucellosis to be used in developing countries. Continue reading →
Saving livestock with vaccines, Jun/2016
Tremendous research progress has been made over the last ten years to better control the deadly African disease of cattle known as East Coast fever. This disease is caused by a single-celled organism, Theileria parva, which is carried by some tick species. Cattle become infected when a tick carrying the parasite takes a blood-meal from the animal over several days. Continue reading →
ILRI news blog, Jun/2016
A recent review article contained a graphic illustrating the life cycle of Theileria parva. The figure illustrates the different life cycle stages of the parasite as it cycles through the mammalian and tick host. The figure was inspired by fluorescence and electron micrograph images of the parasite life cycle ( Fawcett et al., 1982a, Norval … Continue reading →
Saving livestock with vaccines, Jun/2016
The information presented in this manual will help laboratory technicians, scientists, extension officers, policymakers and private vaccine distributors to improve their understanding of the principles of effective storage and handling of vaccines. Continue reading →
Saving livestock with vaccines, Jun/2016
Today and tomorrow (31 May–1 Jun 2016), Chatham House, the Livestock Global Alliance (LGA), the One Health Platform and other One Health partners are convening senior policymakers, academics, multilateral development agencies, business leaders and other private-sector stakeholders to discuss livestock’s role in poverty reduction, sustainable livestock production systems, innovations in livestock vaccines and diagnostics and the value of establishing national and regional One Health centres to provide advice on links among agriculture, sustainable livestock systems and human development. Continue reading →
ILRI news blog, May/2016
It is well established that a primary component of East Coast Fever is parasite-driven proliferation of the cow’s lymphocytes. Unknown until now was the important role of the cow’s macrophages in driving an inflammatory response resulting in injury to blood vessels in the lung and respiratory failure. Continue reading →
Saving livestock with vaccines, May/2016

Pages

Elise Schieck
PostDoc
Joerg Jores
Scientist, Molecular Biologist
Maureen Lorna Atieno Otieno
Research technician
Naftaly Githaka, PhD
Tick Unit Support Officer
Nicholas Svitek
Scientist (Immunologist-Virologist)
Theo Knight-Jones
Epidemiologist/Food safety expert - Post-doctoral fellow

Video

People working on vaccines

Elise Schieck
PostDoc
Joerg Jores
Scientist, Molecular Biologist
Maureen Lorna Atieno Otieno
Research technician
Naftaly Githaka, PhD
Tick Unit Support Officer
Nicholas Svitek
Scientist (Immunologist-Virologist)
Theo Knight-Jones
Epidemiologist/Food safety expert - Post-doctoral fellow