vaccines

This page brings together ILRI and partner resources on vaccines. Click different tabs to see news items, research outputs, journal articles, video materials and presentations as well as ILRI projects and people related to vaccines. See ILRI research on other subjects

South Africa's first 24-hour television news channel, eNCA, has broadcast a 2-minute film that describes how the disease East Coast fever affects cattle in Africa and how research to develop a new-generation vaccine against it may hold promise for research on the human ailments of malaria and cancer. Continue reading →

Saving livestock with vaccines, Apr/2014

Researchers at Washington State University have begun work on a vaccine that could save the lives of millions of cattle around the world. The disease, known as East Coast fever, killed more than 1 million cattle in 11 countries and cost ranchers more than $300 million last year, according to an international research group that includes Washington State University. Continue reading →

Saving livestock with vaccines, Apr/2014

The RVC (through Professor Dirk Werling) is involved in a multi-national program grant entitled “Improved vaccines for the control of East Coast fever in cattle in Africa”. This project was initially jointly led by the late Professor Declan McKeever and Professor Werling and the RVC are proud to continue taking forward this important project despite Professor McKeever’s recent sad death. Continue reading →

Saving livestock with vaccines, Mar/2014

Watch this good, short (2-minute) film by Jim Drury of Reuters TV about an international group of scientists is developing a vaccine to combat deadly East Coast fever, a disease that decimates cattle herds in 12 countries of sub-Saharan Africa. Continue reading →

Saving livestock with vaccines, Mar/2014

Henry Kiara, an ILRI veterinary epidemiologist explains why a new vaccine against East Coast fever matters for farmers. Continue reading →

Saving livestock with vaccines, Feb/2014

Ivan Morrison of the Roslin Institute talks of opportunities offered by a new multi-institutional initiative researching a new-generation vaccine against East Coast fever. Continue reading →

Saving livestock with vaccines, Feb/2014

In January 2014, the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) announced formation of a global consortium to develop a new vaccine against the tick-borne livestock disease East Coast fever. AllAfrica.com featured a photoessay that tells the story of the risks posed to the livelihoods of herders and farmers in Africa by East Coast fever as well as previous research attempts to fight the disease. Continue reading →

Saving livestock with vaccines, Mar/2014

'A team of scientists from The International Livestock Research Institute has launched a project of developing a superior vaccine against the East Coast Fever known to kill one animal after every 30 seconds and currently threatening some 28 million cattle in East and Central Africa. . . .' Continue reading →

Saving livestock with vaccines, Feb/2014

Lucilla Steinaa is a researcher at the International Livestock Research Institute who is a principal investigator in a new project to produce a new-generation vaccine against East Coast fever. Continue reading →

Saving livestock with vaccines, Feb/2014

Jimmy Smith, director general of the International Livestock Research Institute, has published an op-ed on the Impatient Optimists blog of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Excerpt: ‘Knowing that for many Africans the loss of even a single cow can be devastating, an international group of livestock scientists have worked for years to defeat East … Continue reading →

Saving livestock with vaccines, Feb/2014

Pages

Naftaly Githaka
Tick Unit Support Officer
Joerg Jores
Scientist, Molecular Biologist
MAUREEN LORNA ATIENO OTIENO
RESEARCH TECHNICIAN

Video

Photos

A kid Borana goat nurses from its mother

People working on vaccines

Naftaly Githaka
Tick Unit Support Officer
Joerg Jores
Scientist, Molecular Biologist
MAUREEN LORNA ATIENO OTIENO
RESEARCH TECHNICIAN