Feed aggregator

Yield gap analyses to estimate attainable bovine milk yields and evaluate options to increase production in Ethiopia and India

Feed and forages bioscience program:Outputs -

Yield gap analyses to estimate attainable bovine milk yields and evaluate options to increase production in Ethiopia and India Mayberry, D.; Ash, A.; Prestwidge, D.; Godde, Cécile; Henderson, Ben; Duncan, Alan; Blummel, M.; Ramana Reddy, Y.; Herrero, Mario Livestock provides an important source of income and nourishment for around one billion rural households worldwide. Demand for livestock food products is increasing, especially in developing countries, and there are opportunities to increase production to meet local demand and increase farm incomes. Estimating the scale of livestock yield gaps and better understanding factors limiting current production will help to define the technological and investment needs in each livestock sector. The aim of this paper is to quantify livestock yield gaps and evaluate opportunities to increase dairy production in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, using case studies from Ethiopia and India. We combined three different methods in our approach. Benchmarking and a frontier analysis were used to estimate attainable milk yields based on survey data. Household modelling was then used to simulate the effects of various interventions on dairy production and income. We tested interventions based on improved livestock nutrition and genetics in the extensive lowland grazing zone and highland mixed crop-livestock zones of Ethiopia, and the intensive irrigated and rainfed zones of India. Our analyses indicate that there are considerable yield gaps for dairy production in both countries, and opportunities to increase production using the interventions tested. In some cases, combined interventions could increase production past currently attainable livestock yields.

Remote sensing monitoring of land restoration interventions in semi-arid environments with a before–after control-impact statistical design

Our latest outputs -

Remote sensing monitoring of land restoration interventions in semi-arid environments with a before–after control-impact statistical design Meroni, M.; Schucknecht, A.; Fasbender, D.; Rembold, F.; Fava, F.; Mauclaire, M.; Goffner, D.; Lucchio, L.M. Di; Leonardi, U. Restoration interventions to combat land degradation are carried out in arid and semi-arid areas to improve vegetation cover and land productivity. Evaluating the success of an intervention over time is challenging due to various constraints (e.g. difficult-to-access areas, lack of long-term records) and the lack of standardised and affordable methodologies. We propose a semi-automatic methodology that uses remote sensing data to provide a rapid, standardised and objective assessment of the biophysical impact, in terms of vegetation cover, of restoration interventions. The Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is used as a proxy for vegetation cover. Recognising that changes in vegetation cover are naturally due to environmental factors such as seasonality and inter-annual climate variability, conclusions about the success of the intervention cannot be drawn by focussing on the intervention area only. We therefore use a comparative method that analyses the temporal variations (before and after the intervention) of the NDVI of the intervention area with respect to multiple control sites that are automatically and randomly selected from a set of candidates that are similar to the intervention area. Similarity is defined in terms of class composition as derived from an ISODATA classification of the imagery before the intervention. The method provides an estimate of the magnitude and significance of the difference in greenness change between the intervention area and control areas. As a case study, the methodology is applied to 15 restoration interventions carried out in Senegal. The impact of the interventions is analysed using 250-m MODIS and 30-m Landsat data. Results show that a significant improvement in vegetation cover was detectable only in one third of the analysed interventions, which is consistent with independent qualitative assessments based on field observations and visual analysis of high resolution imagery. Rural development agencies may potentially use the proposed method for a first screening of restoration interventions.

When less is more: Innovations for tracking progress toward global targets

Our latest outputs -

When less is more: Innovations for tracking progress toward global targets Rosenstock, Todd S; Lamanna, Christine; Chesterman, Sabrina; Hammond, J.; Kadiyala, Suneetha; Luedeling, Eike; Shepherd, K.; DeRenzi, Brian; Wijk, M.T. van Accountability and adaptive management of recent global agreements such as the Sustainable Development Goals and Paris Climate Agreement, will in part rely on the ability to track progress toward the social and environmental targets they set. Current metrics and monitoring systems, however, are not yet up to the task. We argue that there is an imperative to consider principles of coherence (what to measure), standardization (how to measure) and decision-relevance (why to measure) when designing monitoring schemes if they are to be practical and useful. New approaches that have the potential to match the necessary scale of monitoring, with sufficient accuracy and at reasonable cost, are emerging; although, they represent a significant departure from the historical norm in some cases. Iterative review and adaptation of analytical approaches and available technology will certainly be needed to continuously design ways to best track our progress.

Farm types and farmer motivations to adapt: Implications for design of sustainable agricultural interventions in the rubber plantations of South West China

Our latest outputs -

Farm types and farmer motivations to adapt: Implications for design of sustainable agricultural interventions in the rubber plantations of South West China Hammond, J.; Wijk, Mark T. van; Smajgl, A.; Ward, J.; Pagella, T.; Jianchu Xu; Yufang Su; Zhuangfang Yi; Harrison, R.D. Tropical land use is one of the leading causes of global environmental change. Sustainable agricultural development aims to reduce the negative environmental impacts of tropical land use whilst enhancing the well-being of the smallholder farmers residing in those areas. Interventions with this goal are typically designed by scientists educated in the Western tradition, and often achieve lower than desired uptake by smallholder farmers. We build on work done in farm type classification and studies of factors that influence adaptation, trialling a suite of household survey questions to elucidate the motivational factors that influence a farmer's willingness to adapt to external change. Based on a sample of 1015 households in the rubber growing region of Xishuangbanna, South-west China, we found that farm types based on structural characteristics (e.g. crops, livelihoods) could not be used to accurately predict farmers' motivations to adapt. Amongst all six farm types identified, the full range of motivational typologies was found. We found six motivational types, from most to least likely to adapt, named: Aspirational Innovators, Conscientious, Copy Cats, Incentive-centric, Well Settled, and Change Resistant. These groups roughly corresponded with those identified in literature regarding diffusion of innovations, but such classifications are rarely used in development literature. We predict that only one third of the population would be potentially willing to trial a new intervention, and recommend that those sectors of the population should be identified and preferentially targeted by development programs. Such an approach requires validation that these motivational typologies accurately predict real behaviour – perhaps through a panel survey approach. Dedicated data gathering is required, beyond what is usually carried out for ex-ante farm typologies, but with some refinements of the methodology presented here the process need not be onerous. An improved suite of questions to appraise farmers' motivations might include value orientations, life satisfaction, and responses to various scenarios, all phrased to be locally appropriate, with a scoring system that uses the full range of potential scores and a minimum of follow up and peripheral questions.

Genotyping of Theileria lestoquardi from sheep and goats in Sudan to support control of Malignant Ovine Theileriosis

BecA outputs -

Genotyping of Theileria lestoquardi from sheep and goats in Sudan to support control of Malignant Ovine Theileriosis Ali, A.M.; Salih, D.A.; Njahira, M.N.; Hassan, S.K.; Hussein, A.M.E.; Liu, Z.; Yin, H.; Pelle, R.; Skilton, R.A. Theileriosis, caused by parasitic protozoa of the genus Theileria parasites, are among the major tick-borne diseases of ruminant livestock. The largest economic losses are attributed in particular to those caused by the leukoproliferative species of Theileria: T. parva, T. annulata and T. lestoquardi. Theileria lestoquardi is transmitted by Hyalomma ticks and causes malignant ovine theileriosis (MOT), a disease that is particularly prevalent in Sudan. The disease is considered of a high economic importance in Sudan, where export of sheep is a major component of the national economy. A live vaccine based on a Sudanese isolate of T. lestoquardi (Atbara strain) was previously developed for the control of MOT in Sudan, but not yet deployed in the field. The present study aims to genetically characterize and compare samples of T. lestoquardi circulating in Sudan as well as the live vaccine isolate in order to understand vaccine breakthroughs and failure that may occur. Sheep and goats blood samples were collected from six regions in Sudan that are known to be endemic for T. lestoquardi infection or have experienced outbreaks of MOT. Blood samples infected with T. lestoquardi were identified by PCR or RLB. Genotyping was carried out by (1) sequencing the homologues of two T. parva CD8+ T cell antigen genes, Tp1 and Tp2, and (2) using a panel of seven micro- and mini-satellite markers. A total of 100 T. lestoquardi positive field samples and the T. lestoquardi (Atbara) vaccine were genotyped. The results showed that all samples had mixed genotypes, with several alleles identified at one or more loci. The gene diversity ranged from 0.7840 (TS8) to 0.2133 (TS12) with mean values of 0.5470. PCA revealed three clusters of the parasite in Sudan; interestingly one independent cluster was clearly seen, corresponding to the vaccine isolate. The T. lestoquardi Tp1 homologue showed higher homology with T. annulata than with T. parva sequences included the defined single CD8+ T cell target epitope region. The result indicates that multiple genotypes are a common feature of T. lestoquardi infection in Sudan. Both genotyping and the sequencing results clearly showed that the vaccine isolate is highly distinct from the field samples. This finding raised the question whether vaccination with the prepared lived vaccine will effectively protect animals against challenges by the field isolates of T. lestoquardi. The results of this work will inform on the best approach for controlling MOT in Sudan.

The Africa Biosciences Challenge Fund (ABCF) Fellowship 2017/2018 Call for Applications

Beca news -

  Background

The Biosciences eastern and central Africa - International Livestock Research Institute (BecA-ILRI) Hub, located in Nairobi, Kenya, is a shared agricultural research and biosciences platform that exists to increase access for African researchers to affordable, world-class research facilities.  The mission of the BecA-ILRI Hub is “Mobilizing Bioscience for Africa’s Development” by providing a centre for excellence in agricultural biosciences, which enables research, capacity building and product incubation, conducted by scientists in Africa and for Africa, and empowers African institutions to harness innovations for regional impact.

This mission is achieved by the BecA–ILRI Hub’s contributions to: Patrick Bisimwa, Lecturer, Evangelical University of Africa in DR. Congo

 

  • Research: enabling research to harness the potential of the biosciences to contribute to increasing agricultural productivity and to improving food and nutritional safety and security.
  • Capacity building: Strengthening capacity of NARS to drive and accelerate high-end bioscience research and innovation in agriculture.
  • Education: contributing to the education and training of the next generation of African agricultural research leaders and scientists.
  • Innovation: promoting the development, delivery and adoption of new technologies to address key agricultural productivity constraints.


The BecA-ILRI Hub capacity building program is branded The Africa Biosciences Challenge Fund (ABCF). The ABCF program operates in the critically important intersection between agricultural research for development (ARD), food security, and individual and institutional capacity building. The ABCF program is delivered through: i) a visiting scientist program (the ABCF fellowship) targeting scientists from African national agricultural research organizations and universities to undertake biosciences research-for-development projects at the BecA-ILRI Hub; ii) annual training workshops to support the acquisition of practical skills in molecular biology, genomics, bioinformatics, laboratory management, laboratory safety, equipment maintenance and scientific writing; iii) mobilizing national and regional capacities for joint action; and iv) supporting and strengthening the capacity of national agricultural research systems  (NARS) to deliver on their research for development agenda.
 

Purpose

The purpose of the ABCF fellowship program is to develop capacity for agricultural biosciences research in Africa, to support research for development projects that ultimately contribute towards increasing food and nutritional security and/or food safety in Africa, and to facilitate access to the BecA-ILRI Hub facilities by African researchers (and their partners).  We seek applicants with innovative ideas for short to medium term research projects (up to 12 months) aligned with national, regional or continental agricultural development priorities that can be undertaken at the BecA-ILRI Hub.

Since its inception in 2010, the ABCF program has contributed to strengthening capacities of individual scientists and institutions in sub- Saharan Africa. To enable national programs take full advantage of the opportunities available through the ABCF program, prospective candidates will require full support from their home institution. Institutions are strongly encouraged to nominate staff and faculty members for the ABCF program to help address critical capacity gaps or tackle key agricultural research for development challenges. Letters of  nomination articulating institutional capacity building needs and alignment of the proposed research project to national priorities is an important criteriaon for selection.

Areas of research

Applicants must be scientists affiliated (through employment) with African National Agricultural Research Systems (NARS) e.g. national agricultural research institutes and  universities, and conducting research in the areas of food and nutritional security or food safety in Africa. Those carrying out research in the following areas are particularly encouraged to apply*;

  • Improved control of priority livestock and fish diseases including: African Swine Fever (ASF); Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia (CBPP) and Contagious Caprine Pleuropneumonia (CCPP); Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR); Rift Valley Fever (RVF); East Coast Fever (ECF); Capripox Virus diseases of ruminants;
  • Harnessing genetic diversity for conservation, resistance to disease and improving productivity of crops and livestock and fish (livestock focus: African indigenous breeds, particularly  goats, chickens, alternative small livestock species);
  • Molecular breeding for important food security crops in Africa;
  • Plant transformation to address food insecurity in Africa;
  • Plant-microbe interactions;
  • Tissue culture and virus indexing for production of virus-free planting materials in Africa;
  • Orphan/underutilized species of crops and livestock;
  • Crop pests, pathogens and weed management research, including biological control;
  • Microbial technology for improving adaptation of staple food crops and forages to biotic and abiotic stresses;
  • Rapid diagnostics for crop, livestock and fish diseases;
  • Genomics, bioinformatics and  metagenomics including microbial discovery;
  • Studies on climate-smart forage grasses and mixed livestock-crop systems;
  • Microbial technology for improving adaptation of staple food crops and forages to biotic and abiotic stresses;
  • Soil health in agricultural systems; 
  • Improved control of parasitic pathogens of plants (bacteria, fungi, oomycetes) that cause enormous economic losses as well as environmental damage in natural ecosystems (e.g.: Phytophthora infestans that causes potato blight).


*This list is not exhaustive and applicants working on other relevant topics are welcome to submit their suggestions.

Special opportunities also exist to connect with leading international scientists linked with the BecA-ILRI Hub in the following areas: wheat rusts, insect pests, and nitrogen fixation. Other special opportunities exist to connect with Agri-Food systems CGIAR Research Programs. Such collaboration would allow the applicant’s research to contribute more directly to an impact-oriented research-for-development agenda, and offer additional opportunities for joint activities.
 

Eligibility/applicant requirements
  • The call mainly targets nationals of BecA focus countries (Burundi, Cameroon, Central Africa Republic, Congo Brazzaville, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Kenya, Madagascar, Rwanda, São Tomé and Príncipe, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda). Under special partnership and collaboration arrangements, applicants from other African countries are considered for the fellowship.  The applicant MUST be a researcher employed within NARS or with strong affiliation.
  • Currently engaged in research in food and nutritional security or food safety in Africa, or in a research area with relevance to agriculture in Africa.
  • Good working knowledge of written and spoken English.
  • Completed online application form.
  • A signed letter of endorsement / nomination of the application from the head of the applicant’s home institute/organization/university faculty.

   
Applicants stand a higher chance of acceptance to the program if:

  • They have own funding to fully support their research and all other costs while at the BecA-ILRI Hub, or
  • They are able to secure a significant portion (at least 50%) of their total research budget and other necessary costs while at the BecA-ILRI Hub. In this case they would be seeking partial funding through application for an ABCF fellowship.


We particularly welcome applications from women and less resourced NARS.

What the fellowship covers

The BecA-ILRI Hub has secured funding to sponsor several fellowships on a highly competitive basis. The fellowship will cover the following costs ;

  • Research costs at the BecA-ILRI Hub;
  • Travel;
  • Medical insurance;
  • Accommodation;
  • A modest subsistence allowance;
  • Cost of publication in an open access journal.

 

Key timelines
  • For any inquiries / clarifications related to this call, please send an email to: abcfbeca@cgiar.org
  • Closing date for applications: Applications will be accepted on an on-going basis until 30th June 2018.
  • Notification to successful applicants and commencement of successful projects will be on continuing basis.

Application form

To apply for a fellowship, click on the online application link below:

 http://hpc.ilri.cgiar.org/beca/training/ABCF_2017/

Decision on applications

Details of successful applicants will be posted on the BecA-ILRI Hub website on a continuous basis until completion of the review process.

Note: Successful applicants will be expected to secure leave from their workstation to fully focus on their research fellowship at BecA-ILRI Hub during the fellowship contract period.


Our Sponsors

The ABCF Program is funded by the Australian Department for Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) through the BecA-CSIRO partnership; the Syngenta Foundation for Sustainable Agriculture (SFSA); the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF); the UK Department for International Development (DFID) and the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida).

 

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ILRI Consultancy: Low Emissions Development (LED) feasibility project (closing date: 30 May 2017)

Jobs -

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) seeks to recruit a consultant within its Sustainable Livestock Systems program to develop an investment plan for low emissions interventions in the Kenyan livestock sector. The intervention will relate either to improved feeding practices or improved animal husbandry (or possibly both). The implementation will take the form of a series of fundable components, similar what is required for a Green Climate Fund (GCF) proposal.

ILRI works to improve food and nutritional security and reduce poverty in developing countries through research for efficient, safe and sustainable use of livestock. It is the only one of 15 CGIAR research centres dedicated entirely to animal agriculture research for the developing world. Co-hosted by Kenya and Ethiopia, it has regional or country offices and projects in East, South and Southeast Asia as well as Central, East, Southern and West Africa. www.ilri.org

The position:

Objective of the assignment

The consultant will undertake two key tasks to develop an investment plan for Low Emissions Interventions in the Kenyan Livestock Sector, namely

a. Building on estimates of farm-level profitability from the feasibility analysis, conduct business case analysis for private investments included in the implementation plan. Including costs, likely returns, and risks for:

  • Farmers
  • Input suppliers (of both agronomic supplies and financial services)
  • Value chain actors (e.g. cooperatives, processors, traders, where relevant)
  • Other private finance sources

b. Building on cost-benefit analysis from feasibility studies, conduct cost-benefit analysis for public investments included in the implementation plan (e.g. credit guarantees, technical assistance, national or county policies, development finance).

Final products

  • Submit work plan for analysis
  • Collect information needed for analysis
  • Submit draft analysis and meet with ILRI colleagues to discuss
  • Submit final analysis

Essential skills and qualifications will include:

  • Post-graduate degree in Economics, Finance or Business
  • Demonstrated experience developing investment plans for the agriculture sector
  • Demonstrated expertise in cost-benefit analysis
  • Fluent spoken and written English

Post location: Flexible but several weeks in Nairobi, Kenya are essential.

Consultancy Fee: A lump sum amount shall be made based on the deliverables met.

Duration:  From July to September 2017

Expected places of travel: Nairobi, Western Kenya

How to apply: Applicants should send a cover letter and CV expressing their interest in the position, what they can bring to the job and the names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience to the Director, People and Organizational Development through our recruitment portal http://ilri.simplicant.com/ on or before 30 May 2017. The position title and reference number C/LED/05/2017 should be clearly marked on the subject line of the cover letter.

We thank all applicants for their interest in working for ILRI. Due to the volume of applications, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

ILRI does not charge a fee at any stage of the recruitment process (application, interview meeting, processing or training). ILRI also does not concern itself with information on applicants’ bank accounts.

To find out more about ILRI visit our websites at http://www.ilri.org

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/

ILRI is an equal opportunity employer.

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Could nitrogen-efficient crops be a transformative, food-secure solution to reducing nitrous oxide emissions?

CRP 7 News -

Farmers may have an alternative to applying nitrogen fertilizers. A new study in the journal Plant Science suggests an option to boost crop productivity and dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

The study describes certain plants that possess a trait known as biological nitrification inhibition (BNI), by which the plants suppress the loss of nitrogen (N) from the soil and improve the efficiency of its uptake and use by themselves and other plants.

The authors, who form part of a new BNI research consortium, propose transferring the BNI trait from those plants to critical food and feed crops, such as wheat, sorghum and Brachiaria range grasses. Because it is difficult and costly to transfer the genetically-complex BNI trait into elite crop varieties while preserving high yield potential and other desirable qualities, widespread use of BNI crops will take several years.

Guntur Subbarao, a researcher with Japan’s International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS) and lead author of the study, and colleagues are calling for major research investments to have high BNI food and forage crops grown widely across the globe by 2050 and thus help to meet the goal of limiting global temperature increases to 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

“Dramatically reducing nitrous oxide emissions from agriculture requires a complex, integrated approach that includes more precisely calculating and applying fertilizer doses,” Subbarao said. “But the beauty of BNI technology is that it works with and reinforces biological processes, and all you’ll need to do is sow a seed.”

BNI technology typifies the transformation needed in the current agricultural model and practices, to meet 21st century food production challenges.

“Feeding a global population projected to exceed 9 billion by 2050 will place a tremendous strain on agri-food systems and the environment,” Masa Iwanaga, the president of JIRCAS, said. “At the same time, agriculture is not merely a commodity-producing industry, but part of a larger ecosystem that offers life support and services to human society.”

Download the article: Subbarao GV, Arango J, Masahiro K, Hooper AM, Yoshihashi Y, Ando Y, Nakahara K, Deshpande S, Ortiz-Monasterio I, Ishitani M, Peters M, Chirinda N, Wollenberg E, Lata JC, Gerard B, Tobita S, Rao IM, Braun HJ, Kommerell V, Tohme J, Iwanaga M. 2017. Genetic mitigation strategies to tackle agricultural GHG emissions: The case for biological nitrification inhibition technology. Plant Science.

Led by Japan’s International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS), the BNI research consortium includes the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), the CGIAR Research Programs on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Dryland CerealsLivestock and FishMaize, and Wheat, and the Institute of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, University of Paris, Diderot, France; the Center for Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Changes, University of Portugal; Nanjing Agricultural University, China; the Indian Institute of Millet Research (IIMR), Hyderabad; the Department of Crop Production and Ecology, SLU, Uppasala, Sweden; the Advanced Analysis Center and the Hokkaido Wheat Research Station, both of the National Agriculture and Food Research Organization (NARO), Japan; and the National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences (NIAES), Japan.

ILRI Staff Appointments/Moves: January – April 2017

POD announcement -

Nationally recruited staff (NRS) appointment – Nairobi

Eric Kamau joined International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) – World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) as ICT Project Manager in the Information, Communication and Technology department in January 2017. He has over 7 years’ experience in project management, change management, process re-engineering, business analysis, staff optimization & innovations/ideas management in various sectors including financial services, insurance and Internet service provider. He has a BSc in Computer Science, certified PRINCE2 Practitioner, Certified Business Analyst, ITILV3Expert and currently pursuing MSc Information Systems at United States International University (USIU), Kenya.

 

Nationally recruited staff (NRS) appointments – Addis Ababa

Alemayehu Ayeligne has been appointed as Driver in Africa RISING Project effective January 2017.  Alemayehu holds BA degree in Economics from Bahir Dar University and Diploma in Auto-mechanics from Alpha Higher Institute of Distance Studies. Prior to joining ILRI Africa Rising Project, he was working as a Driver at ILRI LIVES Project at Amhara Regional Office until December 2016

 

Nizam Husen was been appointed as Research AssociateNatural Resources Management and Institutions in Sustainable Livestock Systems Program (SLS) effective January 2017. Nizam holds MSc in Agricultural Economics from University of Hohenheim, Germany and a BSc in Agricultural Economics from Jimma University, Ethiopia. Before joining ILRI, he was working as Research Assistant at University of Hohenheim, Germany.

 

Menilik Chanyalew has been appointed as Accountant-Research in Finance department effective January 2017. Menilik holds an MSc degree in Accounting and Finance, a BA degree in Accounting from Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia. Before joining ILRI, he was working as Consultant for CNFA/USAID funded Projects and UN Office of Project Service (UNOPS), Ethiopia.

 

Chalachew Degie has been appointed as Accountant in Finance department in February 2017.  Chalachew holds MBA in Business Administration from Bahir Dar University, BA degree in Accounting from Alpha Distance Learning University and a Diploma in Accounting from Bahir Dar University, Ethiopia. Prior to joining ILRI, he was working as Junior Accountant in the International Potato Center (CIP) Ethiopia.

 

Abbay Fikru joined ILRI as ICT Customer Service Technician in Information Communication Technology (ICT) department in February 2017. Abbay holds a BSc degree in ICT from Admas University College, Ethiopia and Diploma in Information Technology (IT) from Queens’ College, Ethiopia. Formerly, he was working as Senior IT Expert at MIDROC Ethiopia Project Office (MEPO), Ethiopia.

 

Fiseha Sisay was appointed as Executive Chef in Housing, Catering and Conference Service Unit effective April 2017. Fisseha holds BA degree in Management from Bahir Dar University, Ethiopia, Diploma in Accounting from Zegha Business College, Diploma in Food & Nutrition from Entoto Technical and Vocational School and Certificate in Food Preparation, Hotel Supervisory from Catering and Tourism Training Institute (CTTI). Before joining ILRI, he was working as Executive Chef at Golden Tulip Hotel Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

 

Abiy Degefe was appointed as an Accountant in Finance department effective April 2017. Abiy is ACCA qualified and holds a BA degree and Diploma in Accounting from Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia. Before joining ILRI, he was working as Senior Finance Officer at Concern Worldwide Ethiopia Office.

 

 

Gebrehiwot Hailemariam joined ILRI as a Monitoring & Evaluation Associate/Data Manager effective April 2017 in Africa RISING Project. Gebrehiwot holds an MSc degree in Agricultural Economics from Alemaya University, Postgraduate Diploma in Rural Extension & Teaching from Larenstein, the Netherlands and a BSc degree in Plant Science from Alemaya University of Agriculture. Before joining ILRI, he was working as Project Coordinator at International Potato Center (CIP) Ethiopia.

 

 

Nationally recruited staff (NRS) appointment – Vietnam

Chi Nguyen joined ILRI in March 2017 as the Regional Communications Officer for East and Southeast Asia. She will be based in Hanoi, Vietnam. Prior to joining ILRI, Chi worked as a communications and documentation specialist for FHI360 in Vietnam and communications officer for Centre for Sustainable Rural Development. Having solid background in journalism and communication, she has developed a number of strategic communication framework and products for these organizations. Chi holds a Bachelor of Culture and Linguistics from the National University of Hanoi.

 

 

Internationally recruited staff (IRS) appointments

Birhanu Lenjiso was appointed as a Post-Doctoral Fellow – Gender Analysis in Forage Research in the Policies, Institutions & Livelihoods program (PIL). He has over 10 years of teaching and research experience. He has taught sociology, gender and research courses at Ambo University, Ethiopia for six years. He has also served as chief academic program officer, coordinator of Center for Gender Initiatives (CGI) and head of the department of sociology and social works. He has also worked for ILRI as a research consultant. His research areas include land policy, smallholder agriculture, value chains, nutrition, and food security with strong focus on gender issues. He has published numerous works on the impact of agricultural development policies in international and national peer-reviewed journals. He has a PhD in Social Sciences from Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands an MA in Sociology and BA in Sociology and Social Anthropology from Addis Ababa University. Birhanu is Ethiopian and will be based in Nairobi.

Juliet Kariuki was appointed as a Post-Doctoral Fellow, Gender with the Accelerated value chain Development program (AVCD), livestock breeding component in January 2017. She completed her PhD in Agricultural Sciences under the Division of Social and Institutional Change in Agricultural Development, at the University of Hohenheim. She holds a MA degree in Environment, Culture and Society and a BA degree in Sociology. Her doctoral research focused on understanding the social dimensions of payments for ecosystem service schemes in Kenya with a focus on gender and governance. She also has experience in conducting qualitative and quantitative research on pastoralists’ vulnerability to climate change in arid and semi-arid lands and in understanding marketing and intra- household dynamics of poor men and women in livestock-dependent households from Africa. Juliet’s position is on a joint appointment with the University of Hohenheim and will mainly be based in Nairobi. Juliet is a Kenyan citizen.

Meki Muktar joined ILRI in January 2017 as a Post-Doctoral Fellow in Feed and Forage development program to work on forage genetics/genomics. He has an MSc in plant pathology from Haramaya University, Ethiopia and the second MSc on plant nematology from Ghent University, Belgium. His BSc is on plant science from Hawassa University, Ethiopia. He has worked as a plant pathologist in regional agricultural research institutes in Ethiopia as well as plant molecular genetics, such as on marker assisted breeding, QTL mapping, candidate genes and genome wide association mapping to detect genes/QTLs governing resistance to diseases in plants and diagnostic DNA markers associated or linked with resistance. He has also worked at the MaxPlanck institute and at Potato Germplasm Enhancement Laboratory, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Japan. He has a PhD on crop molecular genetics from MaxPlanck Institute for plant breeding research, Cologne Germany. Meki is an Ethiopian national.

Nicoline de Haan joined ILRI in February 2017 as Senior Scientist, Gender in the PIL program. Nicoline brings to the job extensive experience integrating social science and gender within research projects, both as leader and team member. She is a rural sociologist by training, and got her PhD researching the role of social capital within livestock projects. She has worked with and led multi-cultural and multi-disciplinary teams in Asia and Africa. Recently as core theme leader on gender, poverty, and institution for the CRP WLE, and before that she led the global socio-economics unit for animal health at FAO. Her main interest in this job is to use her expertise and experiences in integrating the needs and demands of the end-users (women and smallholders) to help shape the strategic research work on livestock to increase its development impact. Having spent most of her career understanding the underlying dynamics, decisions, and interactions influencing the status quo and how, working with fellow scientists, these can be changed for more equitable development, she is looking forward to working with ILRI’s scientists on this. Nicoline is from the Netherlands.

Ilona Viktoria Gluecks joined ILRI in April 2017 as the Research Facility Manager within the Biosciences directorate. Her responsibilities will include the overall performance of the ILRI and KAPITI animal facilities and leading their transition to becoming fully fit-for-purpose. She is a veterinarian with key expertise in livestock husbandry and production as well as the development of multi-donor multi-sector programmes to support food and nutrition security and livelihoods especially in the arid and semi-arid lands in the Greater Horn of Africa. Ilona is a German citizen but has lived in East Africa since 1999. She holds a PhD in the epidemiology of diseases in camels from the Freie University, Berlin, Germany and her passion and focus lies in the development of the livestock sector in general and the camel sector in particular.

Habibar Rahman joined ILRI as Regional Representative for South Asia beginning April 2017.  Rahman was previously Deputy Director General (Animal Sciences), Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), New Delhi.  He has a B.V.Sc. & A.H. from Assam Agricultural University, M.V.Sc. from Punjab Agricultural University and PhD in Microbiology and Public Health from G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, India. He pursued his post-doctoral training at the Robert Koch Institute, Germany and University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA.   Rahman’s career includes senior roles in the ICAR-National Institute of Veterinary Epidemiology & Disease Informatics (NIVEDI), the ICAR Research Complex for NEH Region, Gangtok and Shillong and he was Head of the Division, Veterinary Public Health, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly.  Rahman has over 30 years global research experience covering many aspects of veterinary science, especially the role of animal health for improved productivity. He has a substantial publication record, has supervised many students and received a number of national awards. Habibar is from India.

Yaojing Yue was appointed as Post-Doctoral Fellow – Livestock Genetics in the Centre for Tropical Livestock Genetics and Health (CTLGH) program in April 2017.Yue holds a PhD in Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction Science from Gansu Agriculture University in China, MSc in Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction Science from Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS) and BSc in Biology technology from Shandong Agriculture University, China. Before joining ILRI, he was working as an Associate Professor at Lanzhou Institute of Husbandry and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Yue is from China

Nasser K. Yao has been appointed as Scientist Molecular Plant Breeder at the BecA-ILRI Hub. Yao joined the BecA-ILRI hub as Post-Doctoral Scientist, Plant Molecular Breeder in October 2013. At BecA, Yao’s main responsibility is centered on the utilization of modern breeding tools focusing primarily on high-throughput genotyping applications to support breeders, scientists and breeding programs in Africa. Yao is responsible for the overall molecular breeding efforts at the institute through the molecular breeding platform. Prior to joining BecA-ILRI hub, Yao was the Principal Rice breeder at CNRA, the Ivorian National Centre for Agricultural Research and previously a Research Fellow at Research Associate and Consultant working on the Nested Associated Mapping and the Rice Challenge Initiatives projects at the AfricaRice Center. Yao holds a PhD degree in Genetics and Molecular Plant Breeding from the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. He also studied Genetics & Plant Breeding in his MSc and BSc at the Félix Houphouet-Boigny University of Abidjan-Cocody, Côte d’Ivoire, his home country.

ILRI Staff Appointments/Moves: January – April 2017

Latest ILRI announcements -

Nationally recruited staff (NRS) appointment – Nairobi

Eric Kamau joined International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) – World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) as ICT Project Manager in the Information, Communication and Technology department in January 2017. He has over 7 years’ experience in project management, change management, process re-engineering, business analysis, staff optimization & innovations/ideas management in various sectors including financial services, insurance and Internet service provider. He has a BSc in Computer Science, certified PRINCE2 Practitioner, Certified Business Analyst, ITILV3Expert and currently pursuing MSc Information Systems at United States International University (USIU), Kenya.

 

Nationally recruited staff (NRS) appointments – Addis Ababa

Alemayehu Ayeligne was been appointed as Driver in Africa RISING Project effective January 2017.  Alemayehu holds BA degree in Economics from Bahir Dar University and Diploma in Auto-mechanics from Alpha Higher Institute of Distance Studies. Prior to joining ILRI Africa Rising Project, he was working as a Driver at ILRI LIVES Project at Amhara Regional Office until December 2016

 

Nizam Husen was been appointed as Research AssociateNatural Resources Management and Institutions in Sustainable Livestock Systems Program (SLS) effective January 2017. Nizam holds an MSc in Agricultural Economics from University of Hohenheim, Germany and a BSc in Agricultural Economics from Jimma University, Ethiopia. Before joining ILRI, he was working as Research Assistant at University of Hohenheim, Germany.

 

Menilik Chanyalew has been appointed as Accountant-Research in Finance department effective January 2017. Menilik holds an MSc degree in Accounting and Finance, a BA degree in Accounting from Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia. Before joining ILRI, he was working as Consultant for CNFA/USAID funded Projects and UN Office of Project Service (UNOPS), Ethiopia.

 

Chalachew Degie was been appointed as Accountant in Finance department in February 2017.  Chalachew holds an MBA in Business Administration from Bahir Dar University, BA degree in Accounting from Alpha Distance Learning University and a Diploma in Accounting from Bahir Dar University, Ethiopia. Prior to joining ILRI, he was working as Junior Accountant in the International Potato Center (CIP) Ethiopia.

 

Abbay Fikru joined ILRI as ICT Customer Service Technician in Information Communication Technology (ICT) department in February 2017. Abbay holds a BSc degree in ICT from Admas University College, Ethiopia and Diploma in Information Technology (IT) from Queens’ College, Ethiopia. Formerly, he was working as Senior IT Expert at MIDROC Ethiopia Project Office (MEPO), Ethiopia.

 

Fiseha Sisay was appointed as Executive Chef in Housing, Catering and Conference Service Unit effective April 2017. Fisseha holds BA degree in Management from Bahir Dar University, Ethiopia, Diploma in Accounting from Zegha Business College, Diploma in Food & Nutrition from Entoto Technical and Vocational School and Certificate in Food Preparation, Hotel Supervisory from Catering and Tourism Training Institute (CTTI). Before joining ILRI, he was working as Executive Chef at Golden Tulip Hotel Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

 

Abiy Degefe was appointed as an Accountant in Finance department effective April 2017. Abiy is ACCA qualified and holds a BA degree, Accounting and Diploma in Accounting from Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia. Before joining ILRI, he was working as Senior Finance Officer at Concern Worldwide Ethiopia Office.

 

 

Gebrehiwot Hailemariam joined ILRI as a Monitoring & Evaluation Associate/Data Manager effective April 2017 in Africa RISING Project. Gebrehiwot holds an MSc degree in Agricultural Economics from Alemaya University, Postgraduate Diploma in Rural Extension & Teaching from Larenstein, the Netherlands and a BSc degree in Plant Science from Alemaya University of Agriculture. Before joining ILRI, he was working as Project Coordinator at International Potato Center (CIP) Ethiopia.

 

 

Nationally recruited staff (NRS) appointment – Vietnam

Chi Nguyen joined ILRI in March 2017 as the Regional Communications Officer for East and Southeast Asia. She will be based in Hanoi, Vietnam. Prior to joining ILRI, Chi worked as a communications and documentation specialist for FHI360 in Vietnam and communications officer for Centre for Sustainable Rural Development. Having solid background in journalism and communication, she has developed a number of strategic communication framework and products for these organizations. Chi holds a Bachelor of Culture and Linguistics from the National University of Hanoi.

 

 

Internationally recruited staff (IRS) appointments

Birhanu Lenjiso was appointed as a Post-Doctoral Fellow – Gender Analysis in Forage Research in the Policies, Institutions & Livelihoods program (PIL). He has over 10 years of teaching and research experience. He has taught sociology, gender and research courses at Ambo University, Ethiopia for six years. He has also served as chief academic program officer, coordinator of Center for Gender Initiatives (CGI) and head of the department of sociology and social works. He has also worked for ILRI as a research consultant. His research areas include land policy, smallholder agriculture, value chains, nutrition, and food security with strong focus on gender issues. He has published numerous works on the impact of agricultural development policies in international and national peer-reviewed journals. He has a PhD in Social Sciences from Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands an MA in Sociology and BA in Sociology and Social Anthropology from Addis Ababa University. Birhanu is Ethiopian and will be based in Nairobi.

Juliet Kariuki was appointed as a Post-Doctoral Fellow, Gender with the Accelerated value chain Development program (AVCD), livestock breeding component in January 2017. She completed her PhD in Agricultural Sciences under the Division of Social and Institutional Change in Agricultural Development, at the University of Hohenheim. She holds a MA degree in Environment, Culture and Society and a BA degree in Sociology. Her doctoral research focused on understanding the social dimensions of payments for ecosystem service schemes in Kenya with a focus on gender and governance. She also has experience in conducting qualitative and quantitative research on pastoralists’ vulnerability to climate change in arid and semi-arid lands and in understanding marketing and intra- household dynamics of poor men and women in livestock-dependent households from Africa. Juliet’s position is on a joint appointment with the University of Hohenheim and will mainly be based in Nairobi. Juliet is a Kenyan citizen.

Meki Muktar joined ILRI in January 2017 as a Post-Doctoral Fellow in Feed and Forage development program to work on forage genetics/genomics. He has an MSc in plant pathology from Haramaya University, Ethiopia and the second MSc on plant nematology from Ghent University, Belgium. His BSc is on plant science from Hawassa University, Ethiopia. He has worked as a plant pathologist in regional agricultural research institutes in Ethiopia as well as plant molecular genetics, such as on marker assisted breeding, QTL mapping, candidate genes and genome wide association mapping to detect genes/QTLs governing resistance to diseases in plants and diagnostic DNA markers associated or linked with resistance. He has also worked at the MaxPlanck institute and at Potato Germplasm Enhancement Laboratory, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Japan. He has a PhD on crop molecular genetics from MaxPlanck Institute for plant breeding research, Cologne Germany. Meki is an Ethiopian national.

Nicoline de Haan joined ILRI in February 2017 as Senior Scientist, Gender in the PIL program. Nicoline brings to the job extensive experience integrating social science and gender within research projects, both as leader and team member. She is a rural sociologist by training, and got her PhD researching the role of social capital within livestock projects. She has worked with and led multi-cultural and multi-disciplinary teams in Asia and Africa. Recently as core theme leader on gender, poverty, and institution for the CRP WLE, and before that she led the global socio-economics unit for animal health at FAO. Her main interest in this job is to use her expertise and experiences in integrating the needs and demands of the end-users (women and smallholders) to help shape the strategic research work on livestock to increase its development impact. Having spent most of her career understanding the underlying dynamics, decisions, and interactions influencing the status quo and how, working with fellow scientists, these can be changed for more equitable development, she is looking forward to working with ILRI’s scientists on this. Nicoline is from the Netherlands.

Ilona Viktoria Gluecks joined ILRI in April 2017 as the Research Facility Manager within the Biosciences directorate. Her responsibilities will include the overall performance of the ILRI and KAPITI animal facilities and leading their transition to becoming fully fit-for-purpose. She is a veterinarian with key expertise in livestock husbandry and production as well as the development of multi-donor multi-sector programmes to support food and nutrition security and livelihoods especially in the arid and semi-arid lands in the Greater Horn of Africa. Ilona is a German citizen but has lived in East Africa since 1999. She holds a PhD in the epidemiology of diseases in camels from the Freie University, Berlin, Germany and her passion and focus lies in the development of the livestock sector in general and the camel sector in particular.

Habibar Rahman joined ILRI as Regional Representative for South Asia beginning April 2017.  Rahman was previously Deputy Director General (Animal Sciences), Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), New Delhi.  He has a B.V.Sc. & A.H. from Assam Agricultural University, M.V.Sc. from Punjab Agricultural University and PhD in Microbiology and Public Health from G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, India. He pursued his post-doctoral training at the Robert Koch Institute, Germany and University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA.   Rahman’s career includes senior roles in the ICAR-National Institute of Veterinary Epidemiology & Disease Informatics (NIVEDI), the ICAR Research Complex for NEH Region, Gangtok and Shillong and he was Head of the Division, Veterinary Public Health, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly.  Rahman has over 30 years global research experience covering many aspects of veterinary science, especially the role of animal health for improved productivity. He has a substantial publication record, has supervised many students and received a number of national awards. Habibar is from India.

Yaojing Yue was appointed as Post-Doctoral Fellow – Livestock Genetics in the Centre for Tropical Livestock Genetics and Health (CTLGH) program in April 2017.Yue holds a PhD in Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction Science from Gansu Agriculture University in China, MSc in Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction Science from Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS) and BSc in Biology technology from Shandong Agriculture University, China. Before joining ILRI, he was working as an Associate Professor at Lanzhou Institute of Husbandry and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Yue is from China

Nasser K. Yao has been appointed as Scientist Molecular Plant Breeder at the BecA-ILRI Hub. Yao joined the BecA-ILRI hub as Post-Doctoral Scientist, Plant Molecular Breeder in October 2013. At BecA, Yao’s main responsibility is centered on the utilization of modern breeding tools focusing primarily on high-throughput genotyping applications to support breeders, scientists and breeding programs in Africa. Yao is responsible for the overall molecular breeding efforts at the institute through the molecular breeding platform. Prior to joining BecA-ILRI hub, Yao was the Principal Rice breeder at CNRA, the Ivorian National Centre for Agricultural Research and previously a Research Fellow at Research Associate and Consultant working on the Nested Associated Mapping and the Rice Challenge Initiatives projects at the AfricaRice Center. Yao holds a PhD degree in Genetics and Molecular Plant Breeding from the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. He also studied Genetics & Plant Breeding in his MSc and BSc at the Félix Houphouet-Boigny University of Abidjan-Cocody, Côte d’Ivoire, his home country.

Five methods to evaluate the potential impact of climate change on food and nutrition security

CRP 7 News -

One of the constant threats to food and nutritional security (FNS) is climate change. Exploring how this vulnerability manifests itself has been of interest to science, which has mainly focused on the interaction between these two events through agricultural production.

In this context, a new working paper discusses five methods to analyze the multiple dimensions in which climate change, agriculture and FNS are related. Since there is no recognized methodology in the scientific field as the only answer to evaluate the interaction between these three concepts, the document presents the different tools available to address the issue.

Download the working paper:

Methods Proposed to Evaluate the Potential Impact of Climate Change on Food and Nutrition Security in Central America and the Dominican Republic

The first tool discussed includes food and nutrition scenarios that combine socio-economic and climate information to enable better planning of interventions and can be applied at different levels (global as sub-national). For the design of these scenarios, key stakeholders are consulted to identify focus areas, modelling the scenarios identified and the results are calibrated with existing experiences.

The data included reflect performance, production and aggregate demand while taking into account factors such as the availability and diversity of food, access to biofortification, water resources, governance and natural resources. This methodology was already implemented in Honduras to develop the strategy for adaptation to climate change. In all the calculated scenarios, it is observed that the production increases accompanied the demand, and therefore, the available calories.

The second methodology includes different models of regional and national food systems. These include the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Products and Trade (IMPACT) developed by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). IMPACT combines different climate, hydrological, crop simulation, value chains, land use, nutrition, health and wellness models to identify opportunities and challenges for FNS and natural resources management. The model contains five components with different models and monthly information is available, allowing daily calibration up to 2050.

The hydrological model estimates distribution of rainfall, runoff, potable water and available irrigation to calculate the impact of water resources on agricultural yields. Water demand is calculated by incorporating the needs of agriculture, industry and people. The livestock and food production and the markets are modeled with which it is possible to estimate the effects of the variations in the same ones on the FNS. As a result, IMPACT allows the estimation of the population at risk of hunger under the different conditions considered. One of the main conclusions obtained through this methodology is that more crops will be adversely affected by climate change, so investments in adaptation and mitigation measures need to be made.

The third methodology consists of the Gender Toolbox, which allows to observe the differences in the experiences of women and men in the face of climate change. These tools establish the forms of analysis and integration of gender issues in interventions from the design stage to the evaluation.

This tool has been applied, for example, to climat-smart agriculture (CSA) interventions, as it is useful for assessing the vulnerability of men and women to climate change according to the different agricultural activities they perform in the farm/household production. The toolbox is also inclusive of community participation and considers several qualitative methods for analysis. Participatory workshops have been implemented in Africa and Latin America.

The fourth method is surveys and databases as tools to know and monitoring the state of the agricultural sector. The Rural Household Multiple Indicator Survey (RHoMIS) is the most well-known of these tools, grouping in a standardized way different indicators through the food system. These indicators include data on agricultural production, gender, nutrition and poverty from individual surveys, together with CSA relevant estimates based on the characteristics of the farm and production. Information on natural resource management, sustainable agriculture, organic agriculture, pest control, fertilizer use and others can also be included in RHoMIS according to need. The implementation of this survey has identified hidden hunger presented in households in Guatemala, that is, high caloric intake but with a lack of micronutrients.

The second tool proposed in this methodology is the IMPACTLite, Integrated Modelling Platform for Mixed Animal Crop systems, which allows the capture of information on different agricultural activities and characterizes the main agricultural production systems , Contributing to the monitoring of programs or interventions in matters of food and nutritional security.

The last methodology is about the Climate-Smart Villages (CSV). This approach refers to the comprehensive study of the application of CSA practices to a defined group of smallholder farmers. This process involves monitoring the implementation of different strategies at the community level, according to the preferences of the farmers, which allows the study of specific and combined strategies to be scaled. In the CSV approach, each community chooses the strategies to be implemented according to their needs in a participatory manner, generating evidence regarding the management of resources, agricultural results and reduction of emissions.

The authors acknowledge that the value of these methodologies lies in the fact that, in the region, most of the studies are focused on the effects of climate change on agricultural production. The methodologies discussed above allow the analysis to be expanded to consider the interaction between climate change, food security and agriculture. It is proposed to focus efforts on expanding the portfolio of options for communities and farmers through participatory processes, suggesting appropriate adaptation measures for each particular community, and promoting actions that improve adaptation to climate change, food security and mitigation.

Download the working paper:

Cramer L, Huyer S, Lavado A, Loboguerrero AM, Martínez-Barón D, Nyasimi M, Thomas T, Thornton P, van Etten J, van Wijk M. 2017. Methods Proposed to Evaluate the Potential Impact of Climate Change on Food and Nutrition Security in Central America and the Dominican Republic. CCAFS Working Paper no. 196. Wageningen, Netherlands: CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS).

Managing Partners Key to A4NH Phase II Strategy

CRP 4 program news -

As the CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (A4NH) enters its second phase, a group of seven organizations who comprise the program’s managing partners will be key to enacting its research strategy. The seven partners, led by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) bring to the table a diverse portfolio of >> Read more

Ethiopia small ruminant project stakeholders plan and prioritize 2017-18 interventions

CRP 3.7 News -

SmaRT-Ethiopia interventions marketplace - food safety

Workshop participants (photo credit: ILRI/Apollo Habtamu).

By Beamlak Tesfaye

The transformation of small ruminant value chain in Ethiopia is a major goal of the CGIAR Research Program (CRP) on Livestock. These efforts are supported by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)-funded Small Ruminant value chain Transformation in Ethiopia (SmaRT) project.

On 19–20 April 2017, a workshop, in Addis Ababa, brought together livestock sector stakeholders to assess 28 small ruminant value chain transformation interventions identified and tested and/or adopted over the last five years. The goal was to develop integrated packages of proven best-bet technological and institutional interventions for each target site.

Led by the International Centre for Agricultural Research in the Dry areas (ICARDA) and the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), goat and sheep meat value chain research in Ethiopia follows an approach that:

  • Provides a framework for integrating and prioritizing technical and institutional interventions at the different value chain stages.
  • Identifies bottlenecks and opportunities for improving value chain performance.
  • Analyses linkages and value addition along the value chain.
  • Aims at developing market-oriented meat production with defined business models.

The project work is carried out in 8 sites representing 4 regional states of Ethiopia: Horro and Yabello (Oromia), Doyogena and Bonga (Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples’), wag Abergelle and Menz (Amhara) and Tanqua Abergelle and Atsbi (Tigray).

During the workshop, six ‘technical market places’ were organized and participants clusters of ‘buyers’ and ‘sellers’ reviewed technologies and institutional interventions on genetics and reproduction, animal health, animal feed, processing and food safety, marketing, and gender. The interventions’ scalability and suitability were reviewed for each of the targeted sites.

Each team selected interventions which they believe are suitable for adoption in their sites. Participants acknowledged the need to integrating some of the interventions into packages of best-bet interventions. For example, they suggested that the successful community-based breeding program (CBBP) be packaged with health and feeding activities such as improving the reproductive performance of small ruminants; and urea treatment to improve the nutritive value of crop residues or increase use of dual-purpose crops. They identified improving households’ livelihood, enhancing CBBP and raising sheep productivity as key goals of the integration of interventions.

By the end of the workshop, participants had selected, prioritized and planned site-specific intervention packages to be implemented in 2017 and early 2018. The size of the packages will be determined by the availability of finance from the SmaRT Ethiopia Project and the CRP on Livestock.

The meeting was attended by more than 40 people representing different local institutions and international organizations in Ethiopia.

This activity is implemented by SmaRT Ethiopia project which is co-funded by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and CRP Livestock.


Filed under: Article, East Africa, Ethiopia, ICARDA, ILRI, LIVESTOCK-CRP, Scaling, Small Ruminants

ILRI Addis Stores and Transport Unit closure

Latest ILRI announcements -

Please be informed that ILRI Addis Stores and Transport unit will be closed tomorrow May 19, 2017 due to planned supply chain meeting. This is therefore to kindly requested you to submit your store requisitions through the OCS by today May 18, 2017 and for any transportation service need, we can be reached at +251 91141973

Apologies for any inconveniences this may cause.

Regards,

Supply Chain Unit-ILRI Ethiopia

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