Feed aggregator

Challenges and priorities for modelling livestock health and pathogens in the context of climate change

Our latest outputs -

Challenges and priorities for modelling livestock health and pathogens in the context of climate change Ozkan, Seyda; Vitali, Andrea; Lacetera, Nicola; Amon, Barbara; Bannink, Andre; Bartley, D.J.; Blanco-Penedo, Isabel; Haas, Yvette de; Dufrasne, Isabelle; Elliott, John; Eory, Vera; Fox, N.J.; Garnsworthy, P.C.; Gengler, Nicolas; Hammam, H.; Kyriazakis, Ilias; Leclère, D.; Lessire, F.; Macleod, Michael; Robinson, T.P.; Ruete, Alejandro; Sandars, D.L.; Shrestha, S.; Stott, Alistair; Twardy, Stanislaw; Vanrobays, Marie-Laure; Vosough Ahmadi, Bouda; Weindl, I; Wheelhouse, Nick; Williams, Adrian; Williams, H.W.; Wilson, Anthony; Østergaard, S.; Kipling, R.P. Climate change has the potential to impair livestock health, with consequences for animal welfare, productivity, greenhouse gas emissions, and human livelihoods and health. Modelling has an important role in assessing the impacts of climate change on livestock systems and the efficacy of potential adaptation strategies, to support decision making for more efficient, resilient and sustainable production. However, a coherent set of challenges and research priorities for modelling livestock health and pathogens under climate change has not previously been available. To identify such challenges and priorities, researchers from across Europe were engaged in a horizon-scanning study, involving workshop and questionnaire based exercises and focussed literature reviews. Eighteen key challenges were identified and grouped into six categories based on subject-specific and capacity building requirements. Across a number of challenges, the need for inventories relating model types to different applications (e.g. the pathogen species, region, scale of focus and purpose to which they can be applied) was identified, in order to identify gaps in capability in relation to the impacts of climate change on animal health. The need for collaboration and learning across disciplines was highlighted in several challenges, e.g. to better understand and model complex ecological interactions between pathogens, vectors, wildlife hosts and livestock in the context of climate change. Collaboration between socio-economic and biophysical disciplines was seen as important for better engagement with stakeholders and for improved modelling of the costs and benefits of poor livestock health. The need for more comprehensive validation of empirical relationships, for harmonising terminology and measurements, and for building capacity for under-researched nations, systems and health problems indicated the importance of joined up approaches across nations. The challenges and priorities identified can help focus the development of modelling capacity and future research structures in this vital field. Well-funded networks capable of managing the long-term development of shared resources are required in order to create a cohesive modelling community equipped to tackle the complex challenges of climate change.

Sustaining crop productivity while reducing environmental nitrogen losses in the subtropical wheat-maize cropping systems: A comprehensive case study of nitrogen cycling and balance

Our latest outputs -

Sustaining crop productivity while reducing environmental nitrogen losses in the subtropical wheat-maize cropping systems: A comprehensive case study of nitrogen cycling and balance Minghua Zhou; Bo Zhu; Brüggemann, N.; Dannenmann, M.; Yanqiang Wang; Butterbach-Bahl, K. Balancing the nitrogen (N) budgets of agricultural systems is essential for sustaining yields at lower environmental costs. However, it is still rare to find reports on the total N budgets of agricultural systems including all N fluxes in the literature. Here, we conducted a comprehensive study on the effects of different N fertilizers (control, synthetic fertilizer, 60% synthetic fertilizer N plus 40% pig manure N, pig manure N applied at the same rate of 280 kg N ha−1 yr−1) on N pools, cycling processes, fluxes and total N balances in a subtropical wheat-maize rotation system in China by monitoring in situ N fluxes combined with field 15N-tracer and 15N isotope-dilution techniques. The warm and wet maize season was associated with significantly larger N losses via gaseous and hydrological pathways than the cooler and drier wheat season. Nitrate leaching and NH3 volatilization were the main N loss pathways, accounting for 78% and 93% of the annual hydrological and gaseous N losses, respectively. The field 15N tracing experiment showed that the wheat system had a high N retention capacity (∼50% of 15N application), although the N residence time was short. In the subsequent maize season, 90% of the residual 15N-labeled fertilizer in the soil that had been applied to the wheat system was utilized by plants or lost to the environment. The combined application of synthetic and organic fertilizers (pig manure) or application of pig manure resulted in significantly higher soil N retention and lower NO3− leaching, while yields remained unaffected. However, the application of manure resulted in larger NH3 volatilization losses compared with the application of synthetic fertilizer alone. Thus, our study suggests that a combination of synthetic and organic N fertilizers is suitable for sustaining agricultural productivity while reducing environmental N losses by fostering interactions between the soil C and N cycles.

Smallholder dairying: better marketing or better feeding – which comes first?

Enhancing Livelihoods of Poor Livestock Keepers through Increased Use of Fodder: Project news -

The milkIT (enhancing dairy-based livelihoods in India and Tanzania through feed innovation) project aimed to contribute to improved dairy-derived livelihoods in India and Tanzania via intensification of smallholder production focusing on enhancement of feeds and feeding using innovation and value chain approaches.

Financed by the International Fund for Agricultural Development, the project was organized around three sets of interventions:

  1. Diagnostic activities designed to help target interventions to real issues and constraints at community level
  2. Delivery of solutions – technical as well as institutional, to address challenges and needs
  3. Preparing for scale – engaging with other institutions, building partnerships and promoting wider uptake of the solutions and the approaches employed in the project
    . . . all devised and delivered through innovation platforms at different scales.

Addressing the project’s hypothesis that improvements in milk markets would lead to increased productivity, project experiences showed that there are merits to approaches that link farmers to markets (using market ‘pull’ to drive productivity increases) and approaches where farmers focus on increases in milk productivity which will attract the market to them.

This video explains the different approaches used in the milkIT project:

 

More about the MilkIT project


ILRI Vacancy: Internal Audit Clerk (Closing Date: 9 September 2016)

Jobs -

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) seeks to recruit an Internal Audit Clerk to provide clerical support to the Risk Management Section of Internal Audit Unit.

ILRI works with partners worldwide to enhance the roles that livestock play in food security and poverty alleviation, principally in Africa and Asia. The outcomes of these research partnerships help people in developing countries keep their farm animals’ alive and productive, increase and sustain their livestock and farm productivity, find profitable markets for their animal products, and reduce the risk of livestock-related diseases www.ilri.org

ILRI is a not-for-profit institution with a staff of about 700 and in 2016, an operating budget of about USD83 million. A member of the CGIAR Consortium working for a food-secure future, ILRI has its headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya, a principal campus in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and offices in other countries in East, West and Southern Africa and in South, Southeast and East Asia www.cgiar.org

Key Responsibilities

  • Support Internal Auditors on following up on schedules/data, typing, proof reading and filing of documents that include risk registers for each audit and risk assessment carried out and ensure confidentially when processing these documents.
  • Maintain filing Systems for Internal Audit Unit, Risk Management documentations which include; annual plans, timesheets, board reports, Risk Registers and IMC reports.
  • Facilitate logistics and ensure smooth flow of risk management meetings, activities and other office operations.
  • Ensure accurate and complete full cost recovery and cost allocation.
  • Maintain accountable documents and expenses records to use when reconciling costs charged by the Institution.
  • Carry out various tasks as assigned by HIA/Internal Auditors.

 Requirements

  • Diploma in Business Administration, Finance, Accounting or equivalent with at least 1 year of work experience in a similar role.
  • Knowledge in accounting and high proficiency in Microsoft office: spreadsheet and word processing programs and e-mail.
  • Keen to details.
  • Excellent interpersonal skills.
  • Analytical and problem solving skills.
  • Decision making skills.
  • Effective verbal, written and listening communications skills.
  • Effective organizational skills.
  • Time management skills.

Terms of Appointment

This is a Nationally Recruited Staff (NRS) position based at ILRI’s Nairobi campus. It is open to Kenyan nationals only. The position is on a 3-year contract, renewable subject to satisfactory performance and availability of funding.

 Job Level

This position is job level 1B, ILRI offers a competitive salary and benefits package which includes; pension, medical and other insurances for ILRI’s Nationally Recruited Staff.

How to apply: Applicants should send a cover letter and CV explaining their interest in the position, what they can bring to the job and the names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience to the Director, People and Organizational Development through our recruitment portal http://ilri.simplicant.com/ on or before 9 September 2016. The position title and reference number REF: IAC/IU/8/2016 should be clearly marked on the subject line of the cover letter.

We thank all applicants for their interest in working for ILRI. Due to the volume of applications, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

ILRI does not charge a fee at any stage of the recruitment process (application, interview meeting, processing or training). ILRI also does not concern itself with information on applicants’ bank accounts.

To find out more about ILRI, visit our websites at http://www.ilri.org/

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/

 ILRI is an equal opportunity employer.

More ILRI jobs


Announcing the 2016 Norman E. Borlaug Field Award Winner!

Latest ILRI announcements -

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Dr. Andrew Mude
2016 Norman Borlaug Award for Field Research and Application, Endowed by the Rockefeller Foundation
Recipient

5901b66c-74c8-4115-be32-6f3c1187e7b5.jpg Dr. Andrew Mude was announced today as the winner of the 2016 Norman Borlaug Award for Field Research and Application, Endowed by the Rockefeller Foundation, for his work in developing insurance for never-before-insured communities whose livelihoods depend on herding cattle, goats, sheep and camels in the remote, arid and drought-prone lowlands of the Horn of Africa. Mude has made novel use of satellite data to achieve an innovative and highly effective solution that helps pastoral livestock herders reduce the considerable and costly drought-risk they face in this region.

At an event hosted by Director General Jimmy Smith of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) in Nairobi, Kenya, Mude’s selection as the winner of the 2016 Borlaug Field Award for individuals under the age of 40, was made by Ambassador Kenneth Quinn, President of the World Food Prize Foundation, headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa.

“Dr. Mude reflects Borlaug-like persistence in his science-based, community mediated, and innovative approach to providing financial protection, through insurance, to millions of poor herders and their families who care for and depend upon their livestock as they move across the vast rangelands of East Africa,” Quinn said, adding that “It should be a matter of great pride for Kenya that two of the first five Borlaug Field Award recipients are Kenyans.” Dr. Charity Mutegi, also of Kenya received the award in 2013.

Mude will be formally presented with US$10,000 and the “Norman Borlaug Award for Field Research and Application, Endowed by the Rockefeller Foundation”, on October 12, 2016, in a ceremony, in which Rockefeller Foundation President Judith Rodin will participate, in Des Moines, Iowa, USA, as part of the 2016 World Food Prize international symposium.

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A Kenya native who received his Ph.D. from Cornell University, 39-year-old Mude is a principal economist at ILRI. He spearheads a program called “Index-Based Livestock Insurance” (IBLI), which is greatly reducing the vulnerability of East Africa’s livestock herding families to recurring droughts, which kill great numbers of livestock, sending many hungry households in remote regions into deep and lasting poverty.

Since launching IBLI in 2008, Mude and his team have engaged local herders and leaders in building and delivering extension education programs-employing videos, cartoons, and radio broadcasts-to increase understanding of the principles and coverage of the insurance plans.

Before Mude’s innovative approach was implemented, African herders had no access to livestock insurance. It was highly impractical and costly for insurance claim adjusters to travel through East Africa to confirm dead animals and pay claims. IBLI eliminates the need for such visual confirmation of stock losses by using satellite data to monitor grazing conditions – when these conditions are seen to fall below a certain threshold, this data serves as a proxy for dead animals, and insurance payouts are made.

By early 2016, 11,800 IBLI contracts had been sold (representing an insured livestock value of $5,350,000) and $149,007 indemnity payments made to insured pastoralists. In future, more than 50 million pastoralists across Africa are expected to have an opportunity to benefit from this financial technology.

“Dr. Mude represents the type of citizen-servant we as a government are proud to partner with; a citizen dedicated to helping grow the productivity and welfare of the Kenyan people,” said the Honorable Willy Bett, Cabinet Secretary in the Kenya Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries. “It’s because of his passion, commitment, and technical competence that we’re now planning to replicate this novel insurance scheme across all of northern Kenya, where some 4 million pastoralists depend primarily on livestock.”

“With today’s changing climate, weather-based insurance has become a critical tool in building the resilience of some of the world’s most vulnerable populations.” Said Mamadou Biteye, Managing Director of The Rockefeller Foundation Africa Regional Office. “By utilizing the most current technology, Dr. Mude’s innovation is helping pastoralist livestock herders protect their livelihoods. We can provide farmers with no better form of food security than by empowering them to protect themselves from the impacts of climate change.”

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“We have the satellite technology needed to monitor grazing conditions in the remotest of regions,” Mude said. “We should be using it to ensure that Africa’s remote livestock herders have access to basic insurance farmers around the world take for granted. We draw inspiration from Borlaug’s lifelong commitment to make his research make a difference. Together with many partners and the herders themselves-and only together-we’re determined to find new ways to help millions of people continue to practice the oldest form of sustainable food production the world has ever seen.”

As reported this week from Mude’s IBLI team, the government’s KLIP has already provided 5,012 households with IBLI coverage and just last week (August 24, 2016) it made indemnity payments to a few hundred herders in Kenya’s huge and arid northern county of Wajir, which has suffered prolonged drought. And in Ethiopia, Kenya’s neighbor to the north, a government pilot project spearheaded by Mude’s team is working to scale out this insurance program while the World Food Program is making IBLI-type insurance a key pillar of its food security strategy in Ethiopia’s pastoralist lowlands. Other governments and development agencies are seeking help in testing IBLI-type policies across West Africa’s Sahel and the drylands of southern Africa.

ILRI Director General Jimmy Smith agrees. “‘Take it to the farmer’ are reported to be the last words uttered by Norman Borlaug before he died. Andrew Mude and his team, working with the Kenya and Ethiopian governments and others, have taken Borlaug’s injunction to heart, and are taking it even further-to thousands of individual pastoralists raising and herding their animal stock across the vast, remote and generally inhospitable drylands of the Horn of Africa.”

A plan for protecting our hidden water supplies

CRP 5: Program news -

Groundwater already provides a critical lifeline for water-stressed communities, and competition for this valuable resource will only increase as almost half of the global population is expected to experience severe water scarcity by 2030. So how do we ensure its sustainable use?

On the occasion of World Water Week in Stockholm, Jeremy Bird, director general of the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) lays out a plan in The Huffington Post:

One resource, buried underground and in finite supply, is increasingly becoming the lynchpin of modern economies. There is fierce competition for its use and we don’t know how much of it can be exploited sustainably. It is not oil. It is groundwater.

By 2030, almost half of the global population (that’s 3.9 billion people) is expected to experience severe water scarcity. This is predicted to shave six per cent off GDP in the driest regions. As the food riots of 2008 demonstrated, it also spells potential disaster for food security, as irrigation for agriculture uses the lion’s share of water supplies.

Groundwater, found in sand and rock under the earth’s surface, provides a critical lifeline for water-stressed communities where rainfall and river flows fluctuate. In fact, groundwater already irrigates more than 40% of irrigated land. It contributes to the health of local communities, ecosystems and economic growth, through its reliable, steady supply. Yet an increasingly variable climate and growing populations have accelerated demand for groundwater beyond sustainable levels.

Continue reading the full post.

As heard on radio: Karen Brooks talks at 666 ABC Canberra in advance of the Crawford Fund 2016 Annual Conference

CRP 2: program news -

PIM Director Dr Karen Brooks participated in Afternoons with Alex Sloan, a popular radio program on 666 ABC Canberra. She and Brian Lipinski from the World Resources Institute (WRI) are both speaking at the Crawford Fund's 2016 Annual Conference titled "WASTE NOT, WANT NOT: The Circular Economy to Food Security" that started today and were invited to the show to discuss the topic of food waste and loss. 

The playback of the program will be available for the next 7 days at this link (talk with Karen and Brian starting around 1:31:40).

Brian Lipinski @WRIFood & Karen Brooks @PIM_CGIAR talking now with @666canberra on food loss & waste #cfconf16 pic.twitter.com/yu3RyYCPKT

— The Crawford Fund (@CrawfordFund) August 29, 2016

Karen Brooks is one of the two keynote speakers at The Crawford Fund’s conference this year. In her presentation titled “Waste Not, Warm Not: Poverty, Hunger, and Climate Change in a Circular Food System” Karen suggests combining economic and environmental perspectives to look at the full picture of the food waste and loss problem. Read more here>>

 

 

KALRO–ILRI agreement to deepen cooperation in livestock research in Kenya

East Africa News -

KALRO-ILRI MoU signing ceremony

Jimmy Smith (left) director general of ILRI, and Eliud Kireger, director general of KALRO signing the MoU (photo credit: ILRI/Paul Karaimu). 

On 29 August 2016, the Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO) and the International Livestock Research Institute signed a memorandum of agreement that will pave way to deepen their collaboration in agricultural research for development.

The MoU is the culmination of a series of previous meetings between KALRO and ILRI senior management that explored areas of mutual interest in supporting livestock sector development in Kenya.

‘This MoU marks the renewal of a historical relationship between our two organizations and will forge a new partnership that will make our joint activities more effective and efficient,’ said Jimmy Smith, the director general of ILRI.

Eliud Kireger, the director general of KALRO said the agreement was a ‘milestone in regularizing a relationship that has existed between the two organization for many years’. ILRI and KALRO have previously worked in the smallholder dairy development and East Coast fever vaccines development among other projects.

Kireger said the two organizations would share their experiences to create programs that will better benefit the livestock sub-sector in Kenya and the people who depend on livestock. ‘The new agreement will also provide a platform for feedback from end users of livestock research,’ he said.

Following the signing, KALRO and ILRI will now set up a framework for the implementation and monitoring joint programs and activities. They will also work together to support partners, capacity development initiatives and staff exchange programs.

The signing took place at the ILRI campus in Nairobi, Kenya and was attended by senior staff from the two organizations.

Download a brief on ILRI activities in Kenya


KALRO–ILRI agreement to deepen cooperation in livestock research in Kenya

News from ILRI -

KALRO-ILRI MoU signing ceremony

Jimmy Smith (left) director general of ILRI, and Eliud Kireger, director general of KALRO signing the MoU (photo credit: ILRI/Paul Karaimu). 

On 29 August 2016, the Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO) and the International Livestock Research Institute signed a memorandum of agreement that will pave way to deepen their collaboration in agricultural research for development.

The MoU is the culmination of a series of previous meetings between KALRO and ILRI senior management that explored areas of mutual interest in supporting livestock sector development in Kenya.

‘This MoU marks the renewal of a historical relationship between our two organizations and will forge a new partnership that will make our joint activities more effective and efficient,’ said Jimmy Smith, the director general of ILRI.

Eliud Kireger, the director general of KALRO said the agreement was a ‘milestone in regularizing a relationship that has existed between the two organization for many years’. ILRI and KALRO have previously worked in the smallholder dairy development and East Coast fever vaccines development among other projects.

Kireger said the two organizations would share their experiences to create programs that will better benefit the livestock sub-sector in Kenya and the people who depend on livestock. ‘The new agreement will also provide a platform for feedback from end users of livestock research,’ he said.

Following the signing, KALRO and ILRI will now set up a framework for the implementation and monitoring joint programs and activities. They will also work together to support partners, capacity development initiatives and staff exchange programs.

The signing took place at the ILRI campus in Nairobi, Kenya and was attended by senior staff from the two organizations.

Download a brief on ILRI activities in Kenya


Invitation to Nairobi event announcing the 2016 Norman Borlaug Award for Field Research and Application

Latest ILRI announcements -

Colleagues,

Tomorrow, 30th August 2016, we host an important event at the ILRI Nairobi campus. Ambassador Kenneth M. Quinn, President of the World Food Prize Foundation will personally announce this year’s Norman Borlaug Award for Field Research and Application.

Endowed by the Rockefeller Foundation, the award is presented every October in Des Moines, Iowa, by the World Food Prize Foundation. It recognizes exceptional, science-based achievement in international agriculture and food production by an individual under the age of 40 who has clearly demonstrated Borlaug-like intellectual courage, stamina and determination in the fight to eliminate global hunger and poverty.

This year’s awardee is from Kenya and is known to many ILRI staff.

You are cordially invited to this event which takes place in the large tent in the football field. It starts at 1100hrs sharp, with coffee available from 1030hrs. The event finishes at 1230hrs with lunch for invited guests.

For people who cannot join or are located outside Nairobi, we have set up a live web streaming link at: Ilri.org/livestream

Staff in Nairobi: A security message will follow concerning parking and other matters.

Best regards,

Jimmy Smith| Director General
International Livestock Research Institute | ilri.org
Box 30709, 00100 Nairobi, Kenya

 

Uganda's policy makers to consider gender and climate research

CRP 7 News -

During the last decade, evidence that climate change poses gender-differentiated threats to rain-fed farming communities around the globe has grown considerably. There is now little scientific doubt that men and women possess different adaptive capacities to climate change depending on, among other things, their differing gender roles, decision-making powers and access to productive resources within their households and the broader community. These differences are further influenced by factors such as socio-economic status, demographic factors and cultural considerations.

Unfortunately, highly relevant gender and climate change research studies are, more often than not, kept within the confines of scientific forums and academic journals. On the rare occasions when they do reach policy-making circles and, even more rarely, inform policies, they tend to do so in very generic terms and without the context-specific gender and climate change nuances that each specific region and country faces. This only emphasizes the fact that making context-specific gender research findings directly available to legislators and other state actors is fundamental to the pursuit of evidence-based policymaking. After all, what are research findings worth if they are not used, discussed and engaged with by policy actors for the improvement of future policies?

Within the framework of the CCAFS project “Policy Action for Climate Change Adaptation (PACCA)”, the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) has partnered with the Parliamentary Forum on Climate Change and the Parliamentary Forum on Food Security, Population and Development to strengthen the national research-base on agriculture, climate change and food security in the country.

As part of this partnership, a High Level Gender, Climate Change and Food Security event will be held on 30th August 2016 at the Ugandan Parliament to share research findings on gender, climate change and food security in the country; to develop policy recommendations for ensuring gender responsive climate change adaptation in policy makers’ deliberations; and to develop an accountability mechanism for gender auditing and budgeting in climate relevant sectors.

This event builds on the knowledge gathered at the PACCA-Learning Alliance National Reflection Workshop on Gender and Climate Change, held in November 2015, with members from civil society organizations, research institutions, local governments, ministries and the media. The key research evidence and messages that emerged during the event, together with the continued policy engagement that took place after that, form the foundation for the upcoming High Level Gender event.

This comes just as the Ugandan Parliament “Research Week” recently concluded, with a clear message on the need to base legislative decisions on research findings. This message was clearly encapsulated in the words that the Deputy Speaker of Parliament, Rt. Hon. Jacob L’Okori Oulanyah, shared with the rest of the parliamentarians:

“If you are formulating policy, you ask questions like; what is the problem? Is the solution the right one? Were there alternatives? That is what Parliament should ask.”

The High Level Gender and Climate Change event signifies a founding step towards achieving more gender-inclusive climate change and agriculture policies and programs by bringing these discussions to where legislative decisions are made. Furthermore, the event will serve as a forum in which to discuss and identify national gender and climate change research needs so that CCAFS, IITA and partners’ future action research responds directly to the needs of Uganda legislative bodies and that of the country.

Learn more from the outcomes of this event in the coming days on the CCAFS blog! 

Impending changes to your ILRI login

Latest ILRI announcements -

To facilitate improvements to ICT services, the ICT team will be making a change in the way that you login to ILRI systems.

The change for users will be, using CGIARAD\Username or your email address instead of ILRI\Username to all services e.g. Email, Intranet, OCS and all other services and systems requiring network authentication.

We have been working to ensure that all services will recognize this new mode of authentication and therefore expect the change to be seamless.

The migration will involve:

– The ICT team – carrying out a back-office migration activities for user accounts and computers

– Post change support – Following up to ensure that all users can successfully access all resources with your new identity

What’s Next:

– You will be advised in advance when the change is scheduled for you and your computer

– You will receive more guidance at that time.

 

Stephe

ILRI consultancy: Facilitators to conduct Feed Assessment Tool (FEAST) methodology courses(Closing Date: 2 September 2016)

Jobs -

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) seeks to recruit two (2) facilitators to implement FEAST training assessment; which will further enhance ILRI’s contribution to the capacity development and learning aspects of several of its CGIAR Research Programs (CRP) and programs.

ILRI works with partners worldwide to enhance the roles that livestock play in food security and poverty alleviation, principally in Africa and Asia. The outcomes of these research partnerships help people in developing countries keep their farm animals’ alive and productive, increase and sustain their livestock and farm productivity, find profitable markets for their animal products, and reduce the risk of livestock-related diseases www.ilri.org

ILRI is a not-for-profit institution with a staff of about 700 and in 2016, an operating budget of about USD83 million. A member of the CGIAR Consortium working for a food-secure future, ILRI has its headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya, a principal campus in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and offices in other countries in East, West and Southern Africa and in South, Southeast and East Asia www.cgiar.org

Project: Implementing Training Assessment for Feed Assessment Tool (FEAST)

The Position

The Feed Assessment Tool (FEAST) is a simple, participatory approach to introducing feed interventions which ensures that the right conversation takes place between feed experts and livestock keepers to develop better feeding strategies. FEAST was initially developed as collaboration between ILRI and CIAT. The tool has evolved over the past 7 years and has been improved extensively through use in real situations across the developing world. The tool has attracted a lot of interest and is being used in over a dozen countries.

In the current project ILRI intends to conduct five (5) short training sessions of 3-5 days each using the Feed Assessment Tool (FEAST) methodology. We are seeking to recruit two dynamic facilitators to conduct the training sessions.

Responsibilities

  1. The facilitators are expected to facilitate training sessions of 3-5 days each for university students on the FEAST tool methodology. The training session will be conducted using learning materials developed by ILRI. The training sessions will comprise 2 or 4 days classroom training sessions and a one day field practical session with farmers.
  2. The facilitators will be expected to use a combination of facilitation skills and approaches as guided by the learning materials. All training materials and course outlines will be provided by ILRI.
  3. The facilitators will be required to work closely with the ILRI capacity development team to successfully deliver on expected outputs. The facilitator will under supervision of ILRI’s Head of Capacity Development.
  4. Prepare a report on the training process and experiences encountered.

Requirements:

We seek to recruit two facilitators;

  • Facilitator 1: A person with training and knowledge in animal science, animal production, livestock systems in generals or a related discipline. Experience in facilitation is an added advantage. Good knowledge of farming systems in Kenya.
  • Facilitator 2: A person with excellent facilitation and communication skills with any academic background. Good computer mastery. No knowledge of animal science required for this 2nd

For both facilitators;

  • Consistently approaches work with energy and a positive, constructive attitude.
  • Excellent organizational, interpersonal, written, and verbal presentation

Post location: Kenya.

Duration:

Each facilitator will conduct 2-3 courses. The duration of each training course will be seven (7) working days totaling to 14-21 working days per facilitator.  The training courses will be conducted during the period October to November 2016.

How to apply: Applicants should send a cover letter and CV explaining their interest in the position, what they can bring to the role and the names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience to the Director, People and Organizational Development through our recruitment portal http://ilri.simplicant.com/ on or before 2 September 2016.The consultancy title and reference numbernumber   C/ CapDev /08/2016 should be clearly marked on the subject line of the online application.

We thank all applicants for their interest in working for ILRI. Due to the volume of applications, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

ILRI does not charge a fee at any stage of the recruitment process (application, interview meeting, processing or training). ILRI also does not concern itself with information on applicants’ bank accounts.

To find out more about ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/

ILRI is an equal opportunity employer.

More ILRI jobs

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Appointment of Assistant Director General, Biosciences – Dr. Dieter Josef Schillinger

Latest ILRI announcements -

DieterShillingerIt is my pleasure to introduce Dr. Dieter Josef Schillinger, who will be joining ILRI on 1st September 2016 as Assistant Director General, Biosciences. Dieter’s remit will include leading ILRI’s upstream research in animal and human health (including vaccines and diagnostics development), animal breeding and genetics, and feed resources development.

Dieter Schillinger is a veterinarian with 30 years’ experience in the animal health industry that includes experience in applied animal science, tropical veterinary medicine and the development, licensing, marketing and sales of livestock vaccines.

Dieter Schillinger, a citizen of Germany, studied mechanical engineering in Regensburg, Germany, and veterinary medicine in Munich, Germany, where he graduated as doctor of veterinary medicine (Dr. Med Vet) in 1978. Dieter also holds an MBA from Brunel University, UK.

In his early career, Dieter worked several years as a researcher and lecturer at the livestock clinic of the University of Munich, and during this time, he got the opportunity to conduct research for the GIZ project ‘Chemotherapy of Trypanosomiasis’ in Kabete, Kenya for four years.

In 1985, Dieter moved back to Europe and joined the Animal Health Industry where he held various positions in research, clinical development, marketing, general management, and government affairs. During the period of more than 25 years in the private sector, Dieter was involved in trade associations like Health for Animals and the International Federation for Animal Health Europe (IFAH-Europe) where he chaired the Food Chain Committee for four years. From 2003 to 2012 Dieter was elected as the President of the German animal health industry trade association (BfT). Dieter is also a member of the European Platform for the Responsible Use of Medicines in Animals (EPRUMA) and also a member of the European Platform for Global Animal Health (ETPGAH) and DISCONTOOL, as well as a member of the European Innovation Partnership (EIP)-AGRI Focus Group ‘Reducing antibiotics in pig farming’.

Dieter is also the founding chairperson of the NGO ‘Action Africa Help (AAH)’ and acted as Chair of this not-for-profit humanitarian over 7 years until 2003.

In 2012, Dieter founded a consultancy which advises private sector companies in the area of animal health and welfare, modern vaccine technologies, emerging diseases, zoonoses, animal production and public affairs. Presently he is serving on the scientific advisory board of CIFSRF/IDRC ‘Livestock Vaccines for Developing Farmers’, the EU-funded project Precision Livestock Farming and is a member of the Expert Review Panel of the Livestock Vaccine Innovation Fund (LVIF). From 2009 to 2015 Dieter served on the Board of Trustees of ILRI, where he chaired the Audit Committee from 2011 to 2014.

Dieter was awarded an honorary medal by the Veterinary Faculty of the University of Munich, the Wilhelm-Pfeiffer-Medal by the Veterinary Faculty of the University of Giessen and, in 2012, received an Honorary Doctorate from the Ludwigs-Maximilian University Munich.

Dieter has extensive private sector experience, and in interacting with top business leaders, government officials and food chain stakeholders from different nationalities and cultures.

Please join me in welcoming Dieter to the ILRI fraternity!

Jimmy Smith| Director General

 

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