Feed aggregator

Empowering women for climate-smart crop-dairy farming systems

CRP 7 News -

According to the latest census data, the female share of the agricultural labour force in India is close to 37%. Given the conspicuous involvement of women in the sector, further interventions become imperative when assessing women’s ease of performing agricultural tasks as compared to men. Through various studies undertaken time and again, the glaring gap in Indian agriculture in relation to gender gets highlighted and a lot remains to be done in order to bridge the same.

The International Maize and Wheat Improvement Centre (CIMMYT)CCAFS recently held a workshop to address and help enhance the role of women in decision making in the domain of climate-smart agriculture. The workshop titled, ‘Empowering Women for Climate-Smart Crop-Dairy Farming Systems: Post Harvest Management, Value Chains and Market’ was held on 23rdand 24th May at Karnal, which was organized jointly by Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR)-National Dairy Research Institute (NDRI), ICAR-Central Soil Salinity Research Institute (CSSRI) & CIMMYT with the following objectives:

  • Adoption of climate-smart technologies among women farmers to increase decision making by getting engaged in farm budgeting and agri-allied activities and
  • Entrepreneur skill development on post-harvest technologies, livestock management, market knowledge and value creation, thereby translating it into an income source.

35 women participants from villages Basatada, Kutail, Daha and Rindal from Karnal attended the workshop to imbibe from its capacity development initiative.

Workshop trainings

Dr R.B.B. Singh, Director of NDRI, commenced the workshop by referring to the relevance of such initiatives in sensitizing audiences about technologies while disseminating knowledge and enhancing their learning. He pointed out that milk production is an area where women have been and can continue playing a significant role, within the context of livestock management. Such involvement if heightened can be visibly beneficial for agricultural systems as a whole, as was alluded to by Dr M.L. Jat, Principal Scientist at CIMMYT and leader of the CCAFS Flagship project on climate-smart agriculture. While referring to a World Bank report that points towards an ‘ increase in agricultural production by 20% with empowered women' he pointed out that such an increase necessitates optimum utilization of youth and women’s capacities in addition to minimizing post-harvest losses and crop diversification.  Accordingly, “we have a major focus on empowering gender and youth through CSA in our CCAFS projects”  he added. Dr Jat also strongly emphasized the imminent need for technology adoption and enhanced household decision-making ability of women for positive returns in the sector. Dr PC Sharma, Director of CSSRI highlighted the importance of women’s collaborative groups in acquiring higher prices for dairy products after value additions and formalizing links with markets.

Dr Deepa Chandra, Technical Officer at KVK NDRI, Haryana, along with other subject experts, took the initiative for training the participants hands-on in post-harvest management of fruits and vegetables, scientific dairy farming, dairy products making, among others. The participants were provided with in-depth knowledge on the importance of crop-dairy farming systems along with knowledge on modern techniques in livestock management to help increase income yield.

During the Dairy Value Addition training in Karnal, Haryana. The female farmers participating in the workshop receive training on ways for value addition to the dairy products for enhanced income generation. Photo: CIMMYT

The women farmers were exposed to the participatory climate-smart research platforms, wherein they witnessed the potential benefits that can be harnessed from various climate-smart agriculture practices like laser land levelling, zero tillage, residue management, direct seeding of rice, precision nutrient management using Nutrient Expert tool, Green Seeker sensor etc. in isolation as well as in portfolio (bundling of these techniques). Since most of these women farmers are primarily engaged in dairy farming (primary) as well as crop farming (secondary), they could gather maximum benefit from exposure to such trainings as they could relate these climate-smart crop management techniques to their own farming practices.

Further, more practical sessions were organized to enhance awareness on value addition to farm products, increasing the shelf life of dairy products, grains, fruits and vegetables as ways for keeping intact income sources. The sessions were organized with the overarching agenda of skill development of the women participants who would consequently be better equipped to meet the competitive criteria of the market.

Feedback and outcome

Since the trainings were need based with a specific focus on knowledge dissemination, pre-workshop questions were asked about the participants’ existing knowledge as well as their learning aspirations. Post workshop feed-back was collected to record the levels of knowledge gain as well as areas for future trainings. The data thus collected was systematically analysed in order to arrive at the best possible ways for scaling women’s participation in furthering technology adoption in the Climate-Smart Villages. From the collected data it was gathered that out of the participating trainees, 68% were already using some kind of climate-smart technique at their farms. It was also seen that post training, their knowledge on climate-smart technologies (green seeker, nutrient expert, farm budgeting, turbo happy seeder, crop diversification) increased from 48% to 77%. Market-related knowledge was seen to increase from 25% to 68%, while understanding of post-harvest technologies increased from 43% to 77%.

Overall, it was felt that such knowledge awareness sessions and practical trainings would go a long way in equipping the women farmers with the necessary knowledge for adoption of climate-smart and market smart practices through public-private partnerships.

Read more:

How the CGSpace collaboration helps make CGIAR outputs open and accessible

Knowledge and Information blog News -

In recent years, CGIAR centres and research programs have moved towards open access as part of commitments to make CGIAR information products widely accessible.

These efforts span a wide variety of activities including adoption of policies, awareness raising, using open licenses and establishing open access repositories for products as well as data.

An article by  Abenet Yabowork, Alan Orth and Peter Ballantyne in the KM4Dev Journal explains the origins, operation and uses of the CGSpace repository set up in 2009 by the International Livestock Research Institute with several partners.

Starting from an “institutional” effort, it has evolved into a collaboration among dozens of programs and entities, pooling technical efforts and generating collective public goods for the wider agricultural world.

The article covers the CGSpace and open access value proposition, technical developments and choices, content management and standards, use and update, metrics and reach, as well as lessons and promising practices for wider use.

Download the article

This article is part of a special issue of the Knowledge Management for Development Journal on ‘Open research, open data, and your development organization: best practices in information and data management for development.’

ILRI vacancy: Scientist – Bioinformatician (closing date: 17 August 2017)

Jobs -

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) seeks to recruit a Bioinformatician to develop data analysis strategies relevant to gene discovery, immuno-informatics and genotyping using state-of-the-art concepts from computational biology and bioinformatics. The successful candidate should be familiar with high-performance computing environments, job scheduling and parallel computing.

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) works to improve food and nutritional security and reduce poverty in developing countries through research for efficient, safe and sustainable use of livestock. It is the only one of 15 CGIAR research centres dedicated entirely to animal agriculture research for the developing world. Co-hosted by Kenya and Ethiopia, it has regional or country offices and projects in East, South and Southeast Asia as well as Central, East, Southern and West Africa. www.ilri.org

Responsibilities

  • Design and implement bioinformatics pipelines and sequencing methods for quality control, assembly, analysis and interpretation of high throughput sequence data
  • Implement platforms for visualizing data outputs
  • Design, establish and manage relational databases for storage, sharing and efficient retrieval of information
  • Communicate results to the team, students and to researchers via presentations.
  • Identify bioinformatics knowledge gaps and needs and develop solutions to address them
  • Participate in bioinformatics training workshops for scientific staff at ILRI and students.
  • Provide technical guidance and supervise interns and students leading bioinformatics projects at ILRI
  • Publish results of research in high quality peer-reviewed international journals and attend meetings and conferences
  • Participate in the development of new research proposals to mobilize bioinformatics funding at ILRI

Requirements

  • A PhD in Bioinformatics or a related field with a strong interest and experience in laboratory methods development, biological data analysis and biological interpretation of results
  • At least 5 year post-doctoral experience in eukaryotic pathogen genomics
  • Strong experience working with various data types, pipelines, validation, databases, and dealing with challenges in world of bioinformatics
  • Programming skills including Perl, R, Python, Unix/Bash, C or C++. Familiarity with relational databases
  • Working within a UNIX environment
  • Experience in setting up bioinformatics workflows for large-scale DNA and RNA sequencing data sets using software pipelines in an HPC environment.
  • Experience in integrating tools into pipelines and workflows and optimize their interoperability, efficiency, and usability
  • Good written and oral communication skills.
  • Excellent organizational and problem solving skills
  • Ability to work in multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams and experience working in developing countries

Post location: The position will be based in Nairobi, Kenya

Position level: The position level is 4C.

Duration: 3 years with the possibility of renewal, contingent upon individual performance and continued funding.

Benefits: ILRI offers a competitive salary and benefits package which includes 15% Pension, Medical insurance, Life insurance and allowances for: Education, Housing, Relocation, Home leave, Annual holiday entitlement of 30 days + public holidays.

How to apply: Applicants should send a cover letter and CV explaining their interest in the position, what they can bring to the job and the names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience to the Director, People and Organizational Development through our recruitment portal http://ilri.simplicant.com/ on or before 17 August 2017. The position title and reference number B/AHH/07/2017 should be clearly marked on the subject line of the cover letter.

We thank all applicants for their interest in working for ILRI. Due to the volume of applications, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

ILRI does not charge a fee at any stage of the recruitment process (application, interview meeting, processing or training). ILRI also does not concern itself with information on applicants’ bank accounts.

To find out more about ILRI visit our websites at http://www.ilri.org

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/

ILRI is an equal opportunity employer.

More ILRI jobs

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Is integrated crop management in Vietnam climate-smart?

CRP 7 News -

Communities should treat climate change as both a challenge to overcome, as well as an opportunity to improve their livelihoods. However, for that to happen, farmers especially need to adopt “climate-smart” practices that could ensure their productivity and increase their resilience to changes in the climate.

One way to do so is through participatory experiment evaluation, wherein farmers are directly involved in developing, implementing and evaluating an experiment.

How do you know what to do?

The Northern Mountainous Agriculture and Forestry Science Institute (NOMAFSI) tested integrated crop management (ICM) and different rice varieties in the Ma Climate-Smart Village (CSV) of Yen Bai province, Vietnam. NOMAFSI used the participatory experiment evaluation approach, which helped the farmers discuss which practices and varieties would best suit the conditions in the village.

Fifty farmers from the different villages of the Vinh Kien commune joined a field workshop for assessing the ICM practices for rice production and participatory variety selection (PVS) on 25 May 2017. Staff members and officers from the Yen Bai Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, Yen Binh Division of Agriculture and Rural Development and the Vinh Kien Commune People Committee also participated in the activities. 

The ICM trial focused on the following practices: use of healthy seedlings and varieties suitable to the local conditions, cultivation of rice in rows with fixed spaces in between, deep placement of fertilizers, and bio-mass recycling. These would reduce the adverse impacts on human health, as well as reduce labor costs related to fertilizer application.

The PQ and VD5 rice varieties were tested in the ICM trials. Developed and provided by the Institute of Asia-Pacific Science and Technology Research and Cooperation (IAP), these two varieties had been included in the PVS trials in 2016. The farmers in Ma evaluated these as “elite” because of their higher yields and tolerance to cold compared to other varieties. In addition, both varieties were also tender and had a nice aroma when cooked.

During the evaluation activity for the participatory variety selection in Ma Climate Smart-Village, Vietnam. Eight different rice varieties were assessed by the farmer participants during the field day. Photo: L. Sebastian (CCAFS SEA)

On the other hand, the farmers have been assessing different rice varieties through the PVS activities. Aside from PQ and VD5, six other rice varieties were evaluated based on their tolerance to cold and drought, and were also compared to the control variety. These were planted on eight different plots on one paddy field. The farmers and researchers from NOMAFSI then scored the varieties according to the listed criteria, based on their field observations.

The ICM trials were conducted under the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) in Southeast Asia, while the PVS is one of the activities with the Consortium for Unfavorable Rice Environments (CURE).

How did the farmers find the experiment?

Many farmers who participated found ICM an appropriate climate-smart agriculture practice for their area. For them, the biggest benefit of using ICM was the consistency of the rice yield across the fields. ICM does mean, however, that farmers need to spend more time planning and caring for their plots.

Aside from tolerance to cold and drought, the rice varieties planted as part of the PVS trials were evaluated based on their uniformity, grain filling, number of grains per branch, rice quality, taste and smell. One stark difference was the height and apparent vigor of the stress-tolerant varieties, compared to those usually planted by the farmers. This would ensure better crop yields and higher incomes for smallholder farmers. Consumers would also benefit from these tolerant varieties which would be better in quality and nutritional content.

Discussions on the post-harvest processing of rice straw were held after the field evaluations. Farmers usually use herbicide to decompose the remaining rice straw on their fields, however this releases more chemicals into the environment. A biological decomposing agent, on the other hand, would take longer to break down the rice straw, but would also help retain and even build the organic matter in the soil, making it more fertile.

Discussions after the field activities in Ma Climate-Smart Village, Vietnam. These helped determine whether farmers would like to adopt ICM practices. Photo: L. Sebastian (CCAFS SEA)

What happens next?

Of the 50 farmers who participated in the evaluation, 25 expressed their willingness to apply ICM practices for the next planting season.

In conducting the PVS and the ICM trials, the farmers hope to enrich their pool of rice varieties and in time, improve their resilience to climate change and ensure long-term food security.

Through participatory evaluation, farmers from neighboring villages can also learn more about climate-smart agriculture and help in upscaling the practices. Ms Dang Thi Thu, head of Dong Lam village, shared that she will be applying ICM in their own paddy field. She also wants to test the dibbling fertilizer with their winter maize crop.

“I hope that farmers in my village will know more and apply more this technique to help increasing productivity, reducing input cost and help protecting the environment,” said Ms Dang during the activity.

Read more:

ILRI vacancy: Research Assistant – Rangeland Management (closing date: 24 July, 2017)

Jobs -

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) seeks to recruit a Research Assistant to conduct field research and lead community engagement on community-based rangeland management, land tenure, and climate change adaptation in pastoralist settings in the Sustainable livestock systems (SLS).

ILRI works to improve food and nutritional security and reduce poverty in developing countries through research for efficient, safe and sustainable use of livestock. It is the only one of 15 CGIAR research centres dedicated entirely to animal agriculture research for the developing world. Co-hosted by Kenya and Ethiopia, it has regional or country offices and projects in East, South and Southeast Asia as well as Central, East, Southern and West Africa. www.ilri.org

Responsibilities

  • To liaise with community organizations, county government and other county and local stakeholders
    • Manage the project’s partnerships with community organizations
    • Assist in organizing field trials of rangeland management methods
  • To conduct social science field research on varied approaches to supporting and strengthening institutions and governance for community rangeland management.  This will involve:
    • Engaging with leadership of community range management organizations, community members, and staff of NGOs and government agencies
    • Conducting focus groups and interviews
    • Identifying and obtaining data from existing sources
    • Analyzing documentation
  • To assist in developing and testing a research protocol/decision-support tool for assessing land tenure and institutional dimensions for resource management and climate change adaptation in pastoralist settings
  • Assisting with project logistics related to fieldwork and other activities as necessary
  • Report writing

Requirements

  • Master’s degree in Natural Resources Management, Environmental Studies, International Development Studies, Political Science, Rural Development or similar discipline
  • At least two years post-Masters experience
  • Demonstrated and extensive experience in participatory approaches, community engagement, and facilitation
  • Experience working in, and demonstrated knowledge of, pastoralist/rangeland settings
  • Experience with qualitative and participatory approaches to research and analysis
  • Experience working on natural resource governance and management issues in rangeland settings
  • Experience in working with agricultural development projects or programs
  • Fluent in English and Ki-Swahili
  • Fluency in Maa and/or Somali would be an added advantage
  • Excellent English language writing skills

Terms of Appointment

This is a Nationally Recruited Staff (NRS) position based at ILRI’s Nairobi campus. It is open to Kenyan nationals only. The position is on a 6 Months fixed term basis.

Job Level

This position is job level 2C, and ILRI offers a competitive salary and benefits package which includes pension, medical and other insurances for ILRI’s Nationally Recruited Staff.

How to apply: Applicants should send CV , cover letter and writing sample (a chapter from Master’s thesis, a published journal paper, some other report, etc.) explaining their interest in the position, what they can bring to the job and the names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience to the Director, People and Organizational Development through our recruitment portal http://ilri.simplicant.com/ on or before 24 July, 2017. The position title and reference number REF: RA/SLS/07/2017 should be clearly marked on the subject line of the cover letter.

We thank all applicants for their interest in working for ILRI. Due to the volume of applications, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

ILRI does not charge a fee at any stage of the recruitment process (application, interview meeting, processing or training). ILRI also does not concern itself with information on applicants’ bank accounts.

To find out more about ILRI, visit our websites at http://www.ilri.org/

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/

ILRI is an equal opportunity employer.

More ILRI jobs


ILRI vacancy: Drivers – AVCD (closing date: 21 July, 2017)

Jobs -

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) seeks to recruit six drivers for the Accelerated Value Chains Development program (AVCD) to drive passengers and goods to authorised destinations efficiently.

ILRI works to improve food and nutritional security and reduce poverty in developing countries through research for efficient, safe and sustainable use of livestock. It is the only one of 15 CGIAR research centres dedicated entirely to animal agriculture research for the developing world. Co-hosted by Kenya and Ethiopia, it has regional or country offices and projects in East, South and Southeast Asia as well as Central, East, Southern and West Africa. www.ilri.org

Key responsibilities

  • Drive vehicles safely and defensively to avoid any incidents or accidents
  • Keep to the designated routes while driving
  • Before proceeding on trips ensure all travel requirements are met and liaise with supervisor and passenger for instructions
  • Ensure travel expense reports are submitted to the supervisor in time after every field trip
  • Maintaining a clear worksheet on vehicle usage of mileage and fuel consumption
  • Continuously monitor condition of assigned vehicles and promptly report defects
  • Day to day maintenance of the assigned vehicle including cleanliness
  • Ensure timely servicing of vehicle and acquisition/renewal of all necessary licenses/insurance in liaison with Transport Unit
  • Responsible for all tools, equipment and spare parts of assigned vehicles
  • Portray good image of ILRI to visitors and customers
  • Actively participate in creating an atmosphere of team work within the unit by attending meetings, complying with the institutes policies and being a team player
  • Performs other related duties assigned by the supervisor

Requirements

  • Minimum of KCSE
  • At least 5 years work experience of driving within Nairobi and in other counties
  • Must have a clean and valid Kenya Driver’s license
  • Must have a valid certificate of good conduct
  • Knowledge of defensive driving is an added advantage
  • Good knowledge of spoken and written English and Kiswahili languages
  • Ability to work under pressure
  • Good interpersonal skills and ability to relate well with diverse culture
  • Reliable and ability to work effectively and respectfully

Number of Positions:  6

Post location: Each driver will be based in one of the six counties where the project is being implemented:  Turkana, Marsabit, Isiolo, Wajir, Garissa and Nairobi.

Terms of Appointment

These are Nationally Recruited Staff (NRS) positions, open to Kenyan nationals only. The positions are on a 1 year fixed term.

Job Level

This position is job level 1B, ILRI offers a competitive salary and benefits package which includes; pension, medical and other insurances for ILRI’s Nationally Recruited Staff.

How to apply: Applicants should send a cover letter and CV explaining their interest in the position, what they can bring to the job and the names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience to the Director, People and Organizational Development through our recruitment portal http://ilri.simplicant.com/ on or before 21 July 2017. The position title and reference number REF: D/AVCD/07/2017 should be clearly marked on the subject line of the cover letter.

We thank all applicants for their interest in working for ILRI. Due to the volume of applications, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

ILRI does not charge a fee at any stage of the recruitment process (application, interview meeting, processing or training). ILRI also does not concern itself with information on applicants’ bank accounts.

To find out more about ILRI, visit our websites at http://www.ilri.org/

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/

ILRI is an equal opportunity employer.

More ILRI jobs


Why livestock are essential for Agenda 2030—Jimmy Smith at the High-Level Forum on Sustainable Development

Spotlight from ILRI news -

 

Ram-bearer, Cypriot, 6th century BC,
said to be from the temple of Apollo Hylates at Kourion
(photographed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City).

United Nations High-Level Forum on Sustainable Development
Special Event:
The Role of Livestock in Achieving the SDGs

Friday, 14 July, 2017
Institute of International Education (IIE)
Kaufman Conference Room
08:30–10:00AM

Opening remarks by Jimmy Smith
director general of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

Why livestock are essential for Agenda 2030

Ending poverty
Because of livestock’s central contributions to both individual livelihoods and national development, we’re not going to end world poverty (SDG1) if we undervalue the major roles livestock play in the economies of developing countries and their peoples.

In low- and middle-income countries, up to three-quarters of a billion of the poorest people rely on small-scale livestock farming and products to make a living.

Such small-scale livestock production contributes greatly to the agricultural gross domestic product of these agriculturally based countries (40% and growing), with at least 70% of the milk in countries such as India and Kenya coming from small-scale production.

But things must change to respond to an on-going ‘livestock revolution’ due to global demand for livestock products being set to increase by 70 per cent over the next 30 years.

Small-scale livestock enterprises need to make rapid transitions if they are to respond to the growing demand and become thriving, efficient and sustainable enterprises.

If we neglect this short window of opportunity to help people meet their countries’ rising (mostly urban) demand for livestock-derived foods, we will do more than fail to eradicate world poverty once and for all. We will also miss a singular opportunity to guide a positive, equitable and sustainable transition that will impact national economies and the livelihoods of three-quarters of a billion people.

Ending hunger
Because of livestock’s major roles in sustainable agriculture and food production, we’re not going to end hunger, achieve food security and make agriculture sustainable (SDG2) without paying greater attention to the animal agriculture that makes small-scale food production viable and renewable on every continent.

Little known is that the ubiquitous small-scale mixed crop-and-livestock farms of developing countries are responsible for putting more than half the grain, milk and meat on the tables of the poor and better-off alike.

Fully half the staple cereal food could not be produced without the inputs from animal manure, traction or sales.

Perhaps even less apparent are the multiple roles that animal agriculture in the hands of such small-scale mixed crop-and-livestock farmers play in ensuring food security and sustaining agricultural production. For example:

a) providing 18% of global calorie (kcal) consumption and 25% of global protein consumption
b) providing a source of regular income with which to buy diverse and nutritious foods
c) providing via animal manure one-quarter of the nitrogen used to grow crops in mixed crop-livestock systems worldwide

The rapid transition that these livestock production enterprises will undergo in the coming decades means they also present the biggest (and perhaps only) opportunity to address the three interlinked high-level recommendations made in the recent livestock report by the UN Committee on World Food Security. These are: (1) improve resource-use efficiency, (2) strengthen resilience and (3) improve social equity/responsibility outcomes.

Healthy lives
Because of the lifelong difference that animal-source foods make to the world’s most vulnerable people, including the growth and cognitive development of children, healthy lives and the well-being of people of all ages (SDG3) will be unachievable without actions to ensure that healthy and safe animal-source foods are available to all.

Animal-source foods provide humans with vital micronutrients (particularly B12) and make other essential nutrients much more ‘bioavailable’ than plant foods. A regular glass of milk, or a little meat or an egg can prevent stunting in the 158 million children currently affected by it as well as improve the cognitive development of children, ultimately great benefiting the economies of their nations.

Eminent nutritional scientists studying the roles of animal-source foods in the first 1000 days of life warn that it will be impossible to reach the 1000-day SDG targets without including animal-source foods.

Because of their perishability, milk, meat and eggs do present particular food safety challenges, especially as up to 90% of these foods are sold in the so-called ‘informal’ markets of the developing world. This again is an opportunity: novel training and hygiene approaches suited to these traditional markets can make an immense difference to the safety of their products.

In East Africa’s Kenya and India’s state of Assam, over 6 million people have access to safer milk today not because stricter rules and regulations were applied but rather because informal milk processors and sellers were given the training and tools to do so much more safely.

Gender equity
Because of the unique roles livestock play in women’s lives, we’re not going to achieve gender equity and empowerment of all women and girls (SDG5) without deliberate efforts to build upon the multiple and enabling roles that livestock play in female livelihoods worldwide.

Women, who make up a significant portion of the world’s poor livestock keepers, play critical (if under-expressed, under-reported and under-valued) roles in livestock systems.

Women who cannot own land, capital or other major productive resources often can own farm animals, particularly small stock such as goats, chickens and cavies.

And what benefits women in developing countries do get from their livestock enterprises they tend to invest back into feeding their families and educating their children, with a woman’s regular income from dairy or poultry often paying for the education of her daughters.

Because evidence indicates that women’s empowerment is hurt rather than helped if men are left out of the picture, gender-sensitive and -transformative approaches to livestock development need to focus on men as well as women while supporting women in building their social as well as economic capital.


Why livestock are essential for Agenda 2030—Jimmy Smith at the High-Level Forum on Sustainable Development

News from ILRI -

 

Ram-bearer, Cypriot, 6th century BC,
said to be from the temple of Apollo Hylates at Kourion
(photographed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City).

United Nations High-Level Forum on Sustainable Development
Special Event:
The Role of Livestock in Achieving the SDGs

Friday, 14 July, 2017
Institute of International Education (IIE)
Kaufman Conference Room
08:30–10:00AM

Opening remarks by Jimmy Smith
director general of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

Why livestock are essential for Agenda 2030

Ending poverty
Because of livestock’s central contributions to both individual livelihoods and national development, we’re not going to end world poverty (SDG1) if we undervalue the major roles livestock play in the economies of developing countries and their peoples.

In low- and middle-income countries, up to three-quarters of a billion of the poorest people rely on small-scale livestock farming and products to make a living.

Such small-scale livestock production contributes greatly to the agricultural gross domestic product of these agriculturally based countries (40% and growing), with at least 70% of the milk in countries such as India and Kenya coming from small-scale production.

But things must change to respond to an on-going ‘livestock revolution’ due to global demand for livestock products being set to increase by 70 per cent over the next 30 years.

Small-scale livestock enterprises need to make rapid transitions if they are to respond to the growing demand and become thriving, efficient and sustainable enterprises.

If we neglect this short window of opportunity to help people meet their countries’ rising (mostly urban) demand for livestock-derived foods, we will do more than fail to eradicate world poverty once and for all. We will also miss a singular opportunity to guide a positive, equitable and sustainable transition that will impact national economies and the livelihoods of three-quarters of a billion people.

Ending hunger
Because of livestock’s major roles in sustainable agriculture and food production, we’re not going to end hunger, achieve food security and make agriculture sustainable (SDG2) without paying greater attention to the animal agriculture that makes small-scale food production viable and renewable on every continent.

Little known is that the ubiquitous small-scale mixed crop-and-livestock farms of developing countries are responsible for putting more than half the grain, milk and meat on the tables of the poor and better-off alike.

Fully half the staple cereal food could not be produced without the inputs from animal manure, traction or sales.

Perhaps even less apparent are the multiple roles that animal agriculture in the hands of such small-scale mixed crop-and-livestock farmers play in ensuring food security and sustaining agricultural production. For example:

a) providing 18% of global calorie (kcal) consumption and 25% of global protein consumption
b) providing a source of regular income with which to buy diverse and nutritious foods
c) providing via animal manure one-quarter of the nitrogen used to grow crops in mixed crop-livestock systems worldwide

The rapid transition that these livestock production enterprises will undergo in the coming decades means they also present the biggest (and perhaps only) opportunity to address the three interlinked high-level recommendations made in the recent livestock report by the UN Committee on World Food Security. These are: (1) improve resource-use efficiency, (2) strengthen resilience and (3) improve social equity/responsibility outcomes.

Healthy lives
Because of the lifelong difference that animal-source foods make to the world’s most vulnerable people, including the growth and cognitive development of children, healthy lives and the well-being of people of all ages (SDG3) will be unachievable without actions to ensure that healthy and safe animal-source foods are available to all.

Animal-source foods provide humans with vital micronutrients (particularly B12) and make other essential nutrients much more ‘bioavailable’ than plant foods. A regular glass of milk, or a little meat or an egg can prevent stunting in the 158 million children currently affected by it as well as improve the cognitive development of children, ultimately great benefiting the economies of their nations.

Eminent nutritional scientists studying the roles of animal-source foods in the first 1000 days of life warn that it will be impossible to reach the 1000-day SDG targets without including animal-source foods.

Because of their perishability, milk, meat and eggs do present particular food safety challenges, especially as up to 90% of these foods are sold in the so-called ‘informal’ markets of the developing world. This again is an opportunity: novel training and hygiene approaches suited to these traditional markets can make an immense difference to the safety of their products.

In East Africa’s Kenya and India’s state of Assam, over 6 million people have access to safer milk today not because stricter rules and regulations were applied but rather because informal milk processors and sellers were given the training and tools to do so much more safely.

Gender equity
Because of the unique roles livestock play in women’s lives, we’re not going to achieve gender equity and empowerment of all women and girls (SDG5) without deliberate efforts to build upon the multiple and enabling roles that livestock play in female livelihoods worldwide.

Women, who make up a significant portion of the world’s poor livestock keepers, play critical (if under-expressed, under-reported and under-valued) roles in livestock systems.

Women who cannot own land, capital or other major productive resources often can own farm animals, particularly small stock such as goats, chickens and cavies.

And what benefits women in developing countries do get from their livestock enterprises they tend to invest back into feeding their families and educating their children, with a woman’s regular income from dairy or poultry often paying for the education of her daughters.

Because evidence indicates that women’s empowerment is hurt rather than helped if men are left out of the picture, gender-sensitive and -transformative approaches to livestock development need to focus on men as well as women while supporting women in building their social as well as economic capital.


Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals—the roles of livestock

News from ILRI -

Today, the role of livestock in achieving the SDGs is the focus of a special event at the High-Level Forum on Sustainable Development. Organized by the International Livestock Research Institute, Heifer International, the Livestock Global Alliance and the Global Agenda on Sustainable Livestock, the session explores why livestock are essential for Agenda 2030.

Friday, 14 July, 2017
08:30–10:00AM

Institute of International Education (IIE)
Kaufman Conference Room
809 United Nations Plaza (First Avenue opposite UN Visitors’ Entrance)

The discussion builds from these ststements on the role of livestock in achieving the SDGs:

  • Because of livestock’s contribution to individual livelihoods and national economies, we’re not going to end world poverty (SDG1) if we undervalue the major roles livestock play in the economies of developing countries and their peoples.
  • Because of livestock’s role in sustainable agriculture and food production, we’re not going to end hunger, achieve food security and make agriculture sustainable (SDG2) without paying greater attention to the animal agriculture that makes small-scale food production viable and renewable on every continent.
  • Because of the difference to growth and cognitive development that animal-source foods make for the World’s most vulnerable, healthy lives and the well-being of people of all ages (SDG3) will be unachievable without actions to ensure healthy and safe animal source foods are available for all.
  • Because of the unique roles of livestock in women’s lives we’re not going to achieve gender equity and empowerment of all women and girls (SDG5) without deliberate efforts to build upon the multiple and enabling roles that livestock play in female livelihoods worldwide.

08:30-08:45 Opening Session
– Welcome and remarks by Chair/Moderator Mr. Jimmy Smith, director general, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)
– Remarks by H.E. Ms. Amira Gornass, Ambassador of Sudan to Italy, Permanent Representative of Sudan to the Rome Based Agencies & Chairperson, UN Committee on Food Security (CFS)
– Remarks by Deirdre McGrenra, Chief, Americas Liaison Office, Partnership and Resource Mobilization
International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)

08:45-09:30 Panel Discussion – “Livestock and its critical intersection with achieving Agenda 2030”
– Franck C. J. Berthe, World Bank and Livestock Global Alliance
– Akoto Osei, Nutrition Director, Heifer International
– Laura Sommer, Swiss Federal Office for Agriculture

09:30-09:45 Discussion/Question and Answer Period

09:45-10:00 Summary and Wrap-up
– Closing remarks by Chair/Moderator, Mr. Jimmy Smith (ILRI)

Follow the conversation on Twitter with hashtag  SustLivestock

This post will be updated during the day

 


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