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Addis Engineering activities (19 – 20 Nov. 2016)

Latest ILRI announcements -

Engineering and Facility Unit has some activities over the weekend.

1. To make the site ready for external and site work,  areas  in front of new Gene Bank building will be cleaned on the 19 and 20 Nov. 2016.

In connection to this, staff are strictly advised to park their cars away from this location.

2. Cutting of asphalt in two locations as part of campus fire hydrant construction project during the coming two consecutive weekends will follow. This was last week’s plan but due to certain circumstances we have postponed the work  to Nov. 19 and 20, 2016.

This is to kindly inform you  that the main roads leading to Borena bldg. and residences will be closed during this time. So please use the main straight roads  through store, fuel station, Gene Bank, Zebu Club to access to both office and residence.

We will send more updates of the upcoming activities.

 

Adiskidan Abera | Civil and Ground Maintenance Works Supervisor

 

Transport Service for Great Ethiopian Run participants

Latest ILRI announcements -

Notice to all Great Ethiopian run participants

ILRI has arranged  transport service for those who have registered to take part in the 2016 great Ethiopian run.

The bus will leave ILRI  sharp at 7:15 a. m., those who arrive later are advised to get their own means to reach the starting point. Race T-shirts should be collected  today.

Thank you and good luck to all!!

Berhanu Abebe | Sports Supervisor / Coach

Fragmentation of the Athi-Kaputiei plains, outside Nairobi, has caused rapid declines in both pastoralism and wildlife

East Africa News -

rangelandsoutsidenairobi_cropped

Rangelands outside Nairobi, Kenya (photo credit: ILRI/Mann).

A new paper on the consequences of land fragmentation and fencing on rangelands outside Nairobi, Kenya, formerly rich with wildlife and critical for the functioning of Nairobi’s famed national park, has been published. All of the authors are former staff, and one former partner, of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), where this research work was conducted.

‘. . . [R]elative to other systems, the effects of fragmentation in pastoral savanna ecosystems are still poorly understood (Galvin & Reid, 2007), and little is currently known about the forces driving habitat loss and fragmentation and their ecological and economic consequences to pastoral communities.

Understanding the principal underlying causes and consequences of fragmentation and habitat loss is fundamental to the effective management and conservation of human-dominated ecosystems, including the savannas of East Africa . . . .

‘The arid and semi-arid savannas of East Africa are important areas for pastoralism and are also key areas holding large and diverse populations of wild ungulates. However, most of the areas are now faced with increasing land-use changes, fragmentation and habitat loss due to increasing human population, land tenure changes, land subdivisions, agricultural expansion, urbanization and inappropriate land use policies.

‘The Athi-Kaputiei Plains of Kenya (AKP) represent an extreme case where changes in land tenure, proximity to a major city, urbanization and immigration are causing rapid land use changes in a pastoral savanna and may well represent the future of other, currently less intensely used, pastoral ecosystems in East Africa (Ogutu et al., 2013 and Reid et al., 2008). . . .

The AKP epitomises the type and extent of land use changes occurring across most pastoral lands of East Africa and may, unfortunately, well represent the future state of many pastoral savanna ecosystems in the absence of urgent and effective remedial interventions.

‘Changing land tenure arrangements, lasses-faire land use policies, increasing human population and the associated fences and settlements, urbanization and sedentarization of the formerly semi-nomadic Maasai are adversely impacting wildlife and livestock populations and pastoral wellbeing in AKP, as in other pastoral rangelands of East Africa. . . .

The total wildebeest population exceeded 30,000 animals in the 1970s but had dropped to about 509 animals by 2014. The migratory wildebeest population was virtually exterminated from Triangles I and III where their density dropped by 99–100% in both the sparsely and densely fenced areas between 1977 and 1987 and 1999–2014.

‘Wildebeest populations collapsed to a small fraction of their former abundance due to obstruction of their movements by the fences between Triangles I and II, poaching, habitat degradation and loss to roads, settlements and other developments; exemplified by the rapid expansion of Kitengela town. . . .

‘In conclusion, the Athi-Kaputiei ecosystem of Kenya exemplifies an ecosystem experiencing extreme landscape fragmentation due to expansion of fences, settlements, roads, farms and other developments. The location of this ecosystem so close to a rapidly expanding major city where undeveloped land is becoming increasingly scarce and expensive, has made it a strong magnet for those seeking relatively cheap land for settlement, industrial and other developments. Correspondingly, there is massive expansion in infrastructure supporting the expanding developments and human population.

Wildlife and pastoral livestock are being displaced by these changes and their remaining habitats degraded. The corridors for migratory wildebeest, zebra and eland populations in this ecosystem have either become severely restricted or completely blocked. As a result, the range and population size of the once spectacular wildlife populations in this ecosystem have been dramatically reduced.

‘These processes will continue to endanger both the ecological integrity of the ecosystem and the wildlife and livestock populations that it supports, if no appropriate interventions are instituted immediately. Interventions currently being undertaken to counteract the range contractions and population losses are disjointed, underfunded or too limited in their spatial extents to even save the few remaining critical parts of the ecosystem still supporting wildlife and livestock in the long-term. Establishing a community wildlife conservancy whose status is secured by law would be one potential option for protecting parts of the ecosystem still supporting wildlife. Far-sighted land use plans and faithful implementation of such plans are thus necessary to steer other similar ecosystems away from the trajectory followed by the Athi-Kaputiei ecosystem resulting in its current extreme fragmentation and imminent collapse of its functional integrity.’

The Belgian Government and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) funded the mapping of fences in the Athi-Kaputiei Plains through grants to the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF).

Read the whole paper:
Effects of extreme land fragmentation on wildlife and livestock population abundance and distribution, by Mohammed Said, Joseph Ogutu, Shem Kifugo, Ogeli Makui, Robin Reid and Jan de Leeuw, Journal for Nature Conservation, Vol 34, Dec 2016, available online 22 Oct 2016. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jnc.2016.10.005. The following link provides free access to this article until 28 Dec 2016: https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1U0dT_anFkJ2W~

Read about a related scientific paper:
Kenya’s wildlife populations are in ‘widespread’ and ‘catastrophic’ decline—New study, 1 Oct 2016.


Fragmentation of the Athi-Kaputiei plains, outside Nairobi, has caused rapid declines in both pastoralism and wildlife

Spotlight from ILRI news -

rangelandsoutsidenairobi_cropped

Rangelands outside Nairobi, Kenya (photo credit: ILRI/Mann).

A new paper on the consequences of land fragmentation and fencing on rangelands outside Nairobi, Kenya, formerly rich with wildlife and critical for the functioning of Nairobi’s famed national park, has been published. All of the authors are former staff, and one former partner, of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), where this research work was conducted.

‘. . . [R]elative to other systems, the effects of fragmentation in pastoral savanna ecosystems are still poorly understood (Galvin & Reid, 2007), and little is currently known about the forces driving habitat loss and fragmentation and their ecological and economic consequences to pastoral communities.

Understanding the principal underlying causes and consequences of fragmentation and habitat loss is fundamental to the effective management and conservation of human-dominated ecosystems, including the savannas of East Africa . . . .

‘The arid and semi-arid savannas of East Africa are important areas for pastoralism and are also key areas holding large and diverse populations of wild ungulates. However, most of the areas are now faced with increasing land-use changes, fragmentation and habitat loss due to increasing human population, land tenure changes, land subdivisions, agricultural expansion, urbanization and inappropriate land use policies.

‘The Athi-Kaputiei Plains of Kenya (AKP) represent an extreme case where changes in land tenure, proximity to a major city, urbanization and immigration are causing rapid land use changes in a pastoral savanna and may well represent the future of other, currently less intensely used, pastoral ecosystems in East Africa (Ogutu et al., 2013 and Reid et al., 2008). . . .

The AKP epitomises the type and extent of land use changes occurring across most pastoral lands of East Africa and may, unfortunately, well represent the future state of many pastoral savanna ecosystems in the absence of urgent and effective remedial interventions.

‘Changing land tenure arrangements, lasses-faire land use policies, increasing human population and the associated fences and settlements, urbanization and sedentarization of the formerly semi-nomadic Maasai are adversely impacting wildlife and livestock populations and pastoral wellbeing in AKP, as in other pastoral rangelands of East Africa. . . .

The total wildebeest population exceeded 30,000 animals in the 1970s but had dropped to about 509 animals by 2014. The migratory wildebeest population was virtually exterminated from Triangles I and III where their density dropped by 99–100% in both the sparsely and densely fenced areas between 1977 and 1987 and 1999–2014.

‘Wildebeest populations collapsed to a small fraction of their former abundance due to obstruction of their movements by the fences between Triangles I and II, poaching, habitat degradation and loss to roads, settlements and other developments; exemplified by the rapid expansion of Kitengela town. . . .

‘In conclusion, the Athi-Kaputiei ecosystem of Kenya exemplifies an ecosystem experiencing extreme landscape fragmentation due to expansion of fences, settlements, roads, farms and other developments. The location of this ecosystem so close to a rapidly expanding major city where undeveloped land is becoming increasingly scarce and expensive, has made it a strong magnet for those seeking relatively cheap land for settlement, industrial and other developments. Correspondingly, there is massive expansion in infrastructure supporting the expanding developments and human population.

Wildlife and pastoral livestock are being displaced by these changes and their remaining habitats degraded. The corridors for migratory wildebeest, zebra and eland populations in this ecosystem have either become severely restricted or completely blocked. As a result, the range and population size of the once spectacular wildlife populations in this ecosystem have been dramatically reduced.

‘These processes will continue to endanger both the ecological integrity of the ecosystem and the wildlife and livestock populations that it supports, if no appropriate interventions are instituted immediately. Interventions currently being undertaken to counteract the range contractions and population losses are disjointed, underfunded or too limited in their spatial extents to even save the few remaining critical parts of the ecosystem still supporting wildlife and livestock in the long-term. Establishing a community wildlife conservancy whose status is secured by law would be one potential option for protecting parts of the ecosystem still supporting wildlife. Far-sighted land use plans and faithful implementation of such plans are thus necessary to steer other similar ecosystems away from the trajectory followed by the Athi-Kaputiei ecosystem resulting in its current extreme fragmentation and imminent collapse of its functional integrity.’

The Belgian Government and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) funded the mapping of fences in the Athi-Kaputiei Plains through grants to the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF).

Read the whole paper: Effects of extreme land fragmentation on wildlife and livestock population abundance and distribution, by Mohammed Said, Joseph Ogutu, Shem Kifugo, Ogeli Makui, Robin Reid and Jan de Leeuw, Journal for Nature Conservation, Vol 34, Dec 2016, available online 22 Oct 2016. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jnc.2016.10.005


Fragmentation of the Athi-Kaputiei plains, outside Nairobi, has caused rapid declines in both pastoralism and wildlife

News from ILRI -

rangelandsoutsidenairobi_cropped

Rangelands outside Nairobi, Kenya (photo credit: ILRI/Mann).

A new paper on the consequences of land fragmentation and fencing on rangelands outside Nairobi, Kenya, formerly rich with wildlife and critical for the functioning of Nairobi’s famed national park, has been published. All of the authors are former staff, and one former partner, of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), where this research work was conducted.

‘. . . [R]elative to other systems, the effects of fragmentation in pastoral savanna ecosystems are still poorly understood (Galvin & Reid, 2007), and little is currently known about the forces driving habitat loss and fragmentation and their ecological and economic consequences to pastoral communities.

Understanding the principal underlying causes and consequences of fragmentation and habitat loss is fundamental to the effective management and conservation of human-dominated ecosystems, including the savannas of East Africa . . . .

‘The arid and semi-arid savannas of East Africa are important areas for pastoralism and are also key areas holding large and diverse populations of wild ungulates. However, most of the areas are now faced with increasing land-use changes, fragmentation and habitat loss due to increasing human population, land tenure changes, land subdivisions, agricultural expansion, urbanization and inappropriate land use policies.

‘The Athi-Kaputiei Plains of Kenya (AKP) represent an extreme case where changes in land tenure, proximity to a major city, urbanization and immigration are causing rapid land use changes in a pastoral savanna and may well represent the future of other, currently less intensely used, pastoral ecosystems in East Africa (Ogutu et al., 2013 and Reid et al., 2008). . . .

The AKP epitomises the type and extent of land use changes occurring across most pastoral lands of East Africa and may, unfortunately, well represent the future state of many pastoral savanna ecosystems in the absence of urgent and effective remedial interventions.

‘Changing land tenure arrangements, lasses-faire land use policies, increasing human population and the associated fences and settlements, urbanization and sedentarization of the formerly semi-nomadic Maasai are adversely impacting wildlife and livestock populations and pastoral wellbeing in AKP, as in other pastoral rangelands of East Africa. . . .

The total wildebeest population exceeded 30,000 animals in the 1970s but had dropped to about 509 animals by 2014. The migratory wildebeest population was virtually exterminated from Triangles I and III where their density dropped by 99–100% in both the sparsely and densely fenced areas between 1977 and 1987 and 1999–2014.

‘Wildebeest populations collapsed to a small fraction of their former abundance due to obstruction of their movements by the fences between Triangles I and II, poaching, habitat degradation and loss to roads, settlements and other developments; exemplified by the rapid expansion of Kitengela town. . . .

‘In conclusion, the Athi-Kaputiei ecosystem of Kenya exemplifies an ecosystem experiencing extreme landscape fragmentation due to expansion of fences, settlements, roads, farms and other developments. The location of this ecosystem so close to a rapidly expanding major city where undeveloped land is becoming increasingly scarce and expensive, has made it a strong magnet for those seeking relatively cheap land for settlement, industrial and other developments. Correspondingly, there is massive expansion in infrastructure supporting the expanding developments and human population.

Wildlife and pastoral livestock are being displaced by these changes and their remaining habitats degraded. The corridors for migratory wildebeest, zebra and eland populations in this ecosystem have either become severely restricted or completely blocked. As a result, the range and population size of the once spectacular wildlife populations in this ecosystem have been dramatically reduced.

‘These processes will continue to endanger both the ecological integrity of the ecosystem and the wildlife and livestock populations that it supports, if no appropriate interventions are instituted immediately. Interventions currently being undertaken to counteract the range contractions and population losses are disjointed, underfunded or too limited in their spatial extents to even save the few remaining critical parts of the ecosystem still supporting wildlife and livestock in the long-term. Establishing a community wildlife conservancy whose status is secured by law would be one potential option for protecting parts of the ecosystem still supporting wildlife. Far-sighted land use plans and faithful implementation of such plans are thus necessary to steer other similar ecosystems away from the trajectory followed by the Athi-Kaputiei ecosystem resulting in its current extreme fragmentation and imminent collapse of its functional integrity.’

The Belgian Government and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) funded the mapping of fences in the Athi-Kaputiei Plains through grants to the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF).

Read the whole paper: Effects of extreme land fragmentation on wildlife and livestock population abundance and distribution, by Mohammed Said, Joseph Ogutu, Shem Kifugo, Ogeli Makui, Robin Reid and Jan de Leeuw, Journal for Nature Conservation, Vol 34, Dec 2016, available online 22 Oct 2016. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jnc.2016.10.005


From the ground up: Africa aims for sustainable, resilient soil management to combat climate change

CRP 7 News -

Leaders in the agricultural sector from across Africa gathered to support the movement From Science to Action on 13 November 2016, at an event scheduled in collaboration with the Government of Morocco's "Adaptation of African Agriculture" or "AAA" initiative at the UN Climate Talks in Marrakech. The "AAA" founders identified sustainable and resilient soil management as a fundamental element in food system and one of three areas requiring immediate action.

“Nutrient and soil organic matter depletion and soil erosion worsen the effect of climate change and decrease farmer resilience,” Rob Bertram, Chief Scientist for the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Bureau of Food Security, explained in the plenary session of the event. “We have to increase crop productivity in Africa, or else agricultural expansion is just spreading poverty.”

Dr. Rachid Mrabet, research director of the National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA) of Morocco, pointed out key threats to soil in Africa, including erosion, loss of soil organic carbon, and nutrient inbalance. “We need to go from the degradation spiral to the sustainability spiral,” he said.

Professor Tekalign Mamo, laureate of the 2016 IFA Norman Borlaug Award, distinguished soil scientist and former Ethiopian State Minister of Agriculture, sought to emphasize that soil is at the base of our agricultural system and is not to be overlooked in a sessions focused in soils. He said, “Soil is a non-renewable resource that is facing danger of extinction.”

Soil maps of Africa: One cannot manage what is not measured

Professor Mamo explained the extensive EthioSIS research initiative undertaken in Ethiopia – including over 100,000 samples, the critical utilization of the data to examine the full range of options, and how the government of Ethiopia initiated public and private sector relationships that brought needed interventions to farmers. 

Individual country initiatives in South Africa, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Ghana, among others, are generating soil maps and related information, and multi-lateral initiatives in multiple countries and numerous private and institutional soil laboratories are complementing this information. The FAO, for example, is hosting the Global Soils Partnership and recently published a booklet Boosting Africa’s Soils.

However, critical gaps in geographical coverage and richness of data remain, limiting the provision of practical guidance to farmers on sustainable soil management practices and the accurate estimation of greenhouse gas emissions or carbon sequestration.

Soil organic carbon: Sequestration potential and sponge that holds micronutrients together

At a certain level of soil degradation, including minimal soil carbon, no amount of inputs by farmers will make the soil productive. Soil organic carbon is both critical to soil quality and has high mitigation potential, explained Professor Rattan Lal, world-renowned soil scientist from the Ohio State University.

“Soil seems to have suffered from the tragedy of the commons,” said Professor Rattan Lal. “We are using the carbon, but we’re not putting it back.”

Professor Lal called for more data on soil organic carbon in Africa and analysis and promotion of how increases in carbon could be supported, including through conservation agriculture and indigenous knowledge. FAO natural resources officer Martial Bernoux shared that FAO is working with partners to develop a global soil organic map of 2017.

Fertility: Critical to feed the continent

While in certain parts of the world, fertilizer use exceeds recommendations and is causing extensive greenhouse gas emissions and reducing water quality. But not in sub-Saharan Africa, where fertilizer use is the lowest in the world. Charlotte Hebebrand, Director General of the International Fertilizer Industry Association (IFA) said that fertilizer demand from sub-Saharan Africa represented only 1.9% of global demand.

But fertility is also low in sub-Saharan Africa, and the challenge of tripling production by 2050 to feeding the growing population will require improved agronomic management, including fertilizers. A recent CCAFS policy brief: Fertilizers and low emission development in sub-Saharan Africa examines this topic in detail.

"The debate has moved on," Andrew Noble, Deputy Director General of the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) said. "Africa needs BOTH organic & mineral fertilizers, used together.”

Hebebrand suggested that Africa may be able to avoid the overuse of fertilizer elsewhere by maintaining nutrient use efficiency (NUE) through conservation agriculture, site-specific nutrient management, integrated soil fertility management, flexible approaches depending on location, and the 4Rs: right source of nutrients, right rate, right time, and right place.

Increased productivity may also reduce pressures on forests and grasslands.

Here at the UN Climate Talks, as countries strategize to achieve sustainable development goals while implementing their Nationally Determined Contributions to slow climate change, investing in soil fertility is widely recognized essential. And it will pay off: Investments in climate adaptation for smallholders result in profits more than doubling, according to a new study by the UN's International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD).

Learn more: Recent CCAFS research on soils

Richards M, van Ittersum M, Mamo T, Stirling C, Vanlauwe B, Zougmoré R. 2016. Fertilizers and low emission development in sub-Saharan Africa. CCAFS Policy Brief no. 11. Copenhagen, Denmark: CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS). 

Sanou J, Bationo BA, Barry S, Nabie LD, Bayala J, Zougmore R. 2016. Combining Soil Fertilization, Cropping Systems and Improved Varieties To Minimize Climate Risks On Farming Productivity In Northern Region Of Burkina Faso. Agriculture and Food Security 1-12.

Thierfelder C, Matemba-Mutasa R, Bunderson WT, Mutenje M, Nyagumbo I, Mupangwa W. 2016. Evaluating manual conservation agriculture systems in southern Africa. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 222:112-124. 

Vermeulen S, Richards M, De Pinto A, Ferrarese D, Läderach P, Lan L, Luckert M, Mazzoli E, Plant L, Rinaldi R, Stephenson J, Watkiss P. 2016. The economic advantage: assessing the value of climate change actions in agriculture. Rome, Italy: International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD). 

Chakrabarti S. 2015. The mitigation advantage: maximizing the co-benefits of investing in smallholder adaptation initiatives. International Fund for Agricultural Development.

Richards MB, Butterbach-Bahl K, Jat ML, Lipinski B, Ortiz-Monasterio I, Sapkota T. 2015. Site-Specific Nutrient Management: Implementation guidance for policymakers and investors. Climate-Smart Agriculture Practice Brief. Copenhagen, Denmark: CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS).

Roobroeck D, van Asten P, Jama B, Harawa R, Vanlauwe B. 2015. Integrated Soil Fertility Management: Contributions of framework and practices to climate-smart agriculture. Climate-Smart Agriculture Practice Brief. Copenhagen, Denmark: CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS). 

Richards M, Sapkota T, Stirling C, Thierfelder C, Verhulst N, Friedrich T, Kienzle J. 2014. Conservation agriculture: Implementation guidance for policymakers and investors. Climate-Smart Agriculture Practice Brief. CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Copenhagen. 

IAAE Inter-Conference Symposium 2017: Call for papers

CRP 2: program news -

The next Inter-Conference Symposium of the International Association of Agricultural Economists (IAAE) will take place on October 17-20, 2017 in Chile. It will be dedicated to Agricultural Productivity, Climate Change, and Sustainable Resource Management. The aim of the event is to provide a platform for knowledge exchange, discussion, and networking focusing on climate change and sustainability, >> Read more

Capacity development in agri-food systems: Entry points for research

Clippings -

Capdev briefsThe International Livestock Research Institute, and other partners in the CGIAR Research Program on Integrated Systems for the Humid Tropics (Humidtropics) have released eight briefs to help CGIAR Research Programs integrate key ‘capacity development in systems’ concepts into their work.

The briefs cover capacity development across individual, community, organizational and system levels. They are intended to help research and development organizations identify entry points for investment in capacity development. The aim is to highlight tools, products or approaches that can support agricultural research
and/or development projects and programs.

The briefs in the series are:

  1. Capacity Development in Agri-Food Systems
  2. Can Our Research Benefit From ‘Tech, Fun and Games’?: Leveraging Alternative Learning Approaches and Technologies to Enhance R4D Outcomes
  3. Coaching: Guided Action Learning on Agricultural Innovation Systems, Integrating Gender and Youth and Nutrition in AR4D
  4. Integrated Analysis of Complex Agricultural Problems and Identification of Entry Points for Innovation in Agri-Food Systems
  5. Measuring the Effectiveness of Multi-Stakeholder Processes and Partnerships for Innovation and Scaling
  6. Effective Targeting of Interventions Based on Capacity Needs Assessments and Intervention Strategies
  7. Leveraging Instructional Design and Experimental Research Design to Increase the Effectiveness of Capacity Development
  8. Building and Sustaining Capacity in National Systems Through Coordinated, Aligned and Collaborative CapDev Interventions

The briefs were developed by representatives of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture (IITA), the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), the Royal Tropical Institute (KIT), Wageningen University (WUR), and the CGIAR System Management Office.

This series is part of ‘Legacy Products’ developed under the CGIAR Research Program on Integrated Systems for the Humid Tropics (Humidtropics) to help CGIAR Research Programs integrate key ‘capacity development in systems’ concepts into their work in the second phase of CRPs (and beyond).

We would like to acknowledge Humidtropics and the CGIAR Fund Donors for their provision of core funding without which this work would not have been possible.  For a list of Fund Donors please see: http://www.cgiar.org/who-we-are/cgiar-fund/fund-donors-2.


Filed under: Capacity Strengthening, CapDev, CGIAR, CRP12, ILRI, Research

ILRI Vacancy: Post-Doctoral Scientist – Bioinformatics (closing date: 14 December 2016)

Jobs -

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) seeks to recruit a Post-Doctoral Scientist –Bioinformatics to undertake genome sequence analysis of livestock breed populations so as to identify signature of selection and adaption, in support of breeding programs. The Post-Doctoral Scientist will work with Scientists and post-graduate students at the ILRI – Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences’ (CAAS) Joint Laboratory in China as well as at ILRI-Kenya, ILRI – Ethiopia and Centre for Tropical Livestock Genetics and Health- CTLGH, United Kingdom.

ILRI works with partners worldwide to enhance the roles that livestock play in food security and poverty alleviation, principally in Africa and Asia. The outcomes of these research partnerships help people in developing countries keep their farm animals’ alive and productive, increase and sustain their livestock and farm productivity, find profitable markets for their animal products, and reduce the risk of livestock-related diseases. www.ilri.org

ILRI is a not-for-profit institution with a staff of approximately 700 and in 2016, an operating budget of around USD 83 million. A member of the CGIAR Consortium working for a food-secure future, ILRI has its headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya, a principal campus in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and offices in other countries in East, West and Southern Africa and in South, Southeast and East Asia. www.cgiar.org

Responsibilities:

  • Contribute to existing research projects and build independent research activities in bioinformatics related to livestock genetics research
  • Provide training and contribution to capacity building activities (e.g. supervision of post-graduate students ILRI-CAAS Joint Laboratory in China as well as at ILRI – Kenya, ILRI – Ethiopia, and CTLGH – United Kingdom research facilities)
  • Ensure integration of informatics into the research and research planning process of the Genetics Flagship within the Livestock CRP
  • Proactively establish and build strong relationship with a range of local, regional and international partners and collaborators
  • Contribute to the scientific quality of the research within the global livestock genetics program (bio)informatics team

Requirements:

  • A PhD and up to 3 years’ experience in bioinformatics or in biological sciences research driven by computational
  • Familiarity with bioinformatics, particularly the use and analysis of high-throughput sequencing data generated by a range of platforms
  • Familiarity with approaches to achieve data integration, interoperability and visualization
  • Familiarity with Linux & Unix platforms and computational pipelines
  • Experience in scripting and programming including R and Python
  • Record of scientific publications
  • Good communication and presentation skills
  • Experience in managing capacity building activities

Post location: The position will be based in Beijing, China

Position level: Post-doctoral level.

Duration: The position is on a 2 year fixed term contract.

Benefits: ILRI offers a competitive salary and benefits package which includes medical insurance, life insurance and allowances for: education, housing, home leave, and annual holiday entitlement of 30 days + public holidays.

Applications:

Applicants should send a cover letter and CV expressing their interest in the position, what they can bring to the role and the names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience to the Director, People and Organizational Development through our recruitment portal http://ilri.simplicant.com/ on or before  14 December 2016. The position title and reference number: PD-Bioinformatics/Bios/11/2016 should be clearly marked on the subject line of the online application.

We thank all applicants for their interest in working for ILRI. Due to the volume of applications, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted. Those who had applied for the

ILRI does not charge a fee at any stage of the recruitment process (application, interview meeting, processing or training). ILRI also does not concern itself with information on applicants’ bank accounts.

To find out more about ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/

ILRI is an equal opportunity employer.

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