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ILRI Vacancy: Monitoring and Evaluation Associate/Data Manager – Internal Advert (Closing date: 2 February 2017)

Jobs -

The Position: The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) seeks to recruit a Monitoring and Evaluation Associate/Data Manager who will be a member of Africa RISING Project team in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

General: The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) works to improve food and nutritional security and reduce poverty in developing countries through research for efficient, safe and sustainable use of livestock. It is the only one of 15 CGIAR research centres dedicated entirely to animal agriculture research for the developing world. Co-hosted by Kenya and Ethiopia, it has regional or country offices and projects in East, South and Southeast Asia as well as Central, East, Southern and West Africa. www.ilri.org.

Background:

Africa RISING (AR) program comprises three research-for-development projects supported by the United States Agency for International Development as part of the U.S. government’s Feed the Future (FTF) initiative. Through action research and development partnerships, the Program will create opportunities for smallholder farm households to move out of hunger and poverty through sustainably intensified farming systems that improve food, nutrition, and income security, particularly for women and children, and conserve or enhance the natural resource base. The three projects are led by the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture in West Africa (Ghana and Mali) and East and Southern Africa (Malawi, Tanzania, and Zambia) and the International Livestock Research Institute in the Ethiopian highlands. The International Food Policy Research Institute leads an associated project on monitoring, evaluation and impact assessment across all the Program countries. To aid with its monitoring activities, IFPRI has developed a web-based project monitoring and mapping tool (PMMT) and assisting program researchers with the management of program-generated data using ILRI’s data repository (CKAN).

 Job Purpose:

The objective of this position is to contribute to the M&E of research activities in Ethiopia providing all the necessary backstopping activities to AR researchers and IFPRI’s M&E team.   The incumbent is expected to accomplish this by working in close consultation with AR researchers in Ethiopia, the M&E team at IFPRI, and AR researchers in other program countries.

Main Duties:

Liaise between AR researchers in Ethiopia and IFPRI’s M&E team regarding overall monitoring of research activities and management of project generated gender-disaggregated data;The incumbent will act as a focal point and local coordinator for Ethiopia with the following duties:

  • Through field and desk activities, provide AR researchers necessary overall support with the planning, implementation, and documentation of AR activities, as well as the necessary protocols and requirements for gender disaggregated data collection;
  • Assist AR researchers and the M&E team with data management through CKAN and the PMMT. Monitor compliance with the Africa RISING data management plan by the researchers, especially timely uploading of data and embargo period;
  • Engage with relevant stakeholders in the technical and operational design and implementation of AR activities as well as gender disaggregated data collection;
  • Together with AR researchers in Ethiopia and in collaboration with the M&E team, through field visits and desk activities collect and ensure timely (and complete) upload of FTF and custom indicators data through the PMMT, for final submission to the FTF Monitoring System;
  • Work with the M&E team and AR researchers in Ethiopia to analyze the data collected and write reports and joint publications, as well as develop necessary project monitoring tools;
  • Interact with AR researchers in the program country and travel occasionally to program countries, as necessary, for in-country meetings and trainings.

Academic and professional qualifications:

Education:

  • At least Master’s degree in agricultural economics, applied economics, applied statistics, biometry, monitoring and evaluation or a very closely related field

Experience:

  • At least 3 years of proven experience in Monitoring & Evaluation in a complex, multi-stakeholder project
  • Demonstrated success in the design and application of monitoring & evaluation systems in a development context, preferably on the agriculture development sector
  • Experienced in survey methodologies and design, data collection protocols, management, analysis and compilation 

Skills:

  • Ability to work independently, pay due attention to details, and deliver with efficiency
  • Solid knowledge of Microsoft Applications (Excel, Word processor) and data analysis software (such as STATA, SPSS, SAS, R, Genstat, etc.)
  • Fluency in written and spoken English and Amharic
  • Demonstrated strong writing skills and capacity to analyze complex phenomena and to publish findings in various forms
  • Excellent interpersonal skills and demonstrated experience in effective interactions and negotiations in a multi-cultural setting with researchers, policymakers, donors, and civil society, facilitating impact of research, capacity strengthening, and bridging across disciplines.
  • Willingness to travel extensively within country and to program countries as required
  • Good organizational skills 

Preferred Qualifications:

  • Good knowledge of the agriculture sector in sub-Saharan Africa, especially in Ethiopia.
  • Working knowledge of a local language of relevance to the geographic areas of research focus.=

Duty Station:  Addis Ababa, Ethiopia with frequent travel to project sites.

Grade:  2D

Minimum Base Salary:  Birr 21,367 (Negotiable depending on experience, skill and salary history of the candidate)

Terms of appointment:  This is a Nationally Recruited Staff (NRS) position, initial appointment is for two years with the possibility of renewal, contingent upon individual performance and the availability of funding. The ILRI remuneration package for nationally recruited staff in Ethiopia includes very competitive salary and benefits such as life and medical insurance, offshore pension plan, etc.

Applications: Applicants should provide a cover letter and curriculum vitae; names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about the candidate’s professional qualifications and work experience to be included in the curriculum vitae. The position and reference number: REF: MEA/DM/03/2017 should be clearly indicated in the subject line of the cover letter. All applications to be submitted online on our recruitment portal: http://ilri.simplicant.com/ on or before 2 February 2017.

To find out more about ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/

Suitably qualified women are particularly encouraged to apply.

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Welcome to Dr H. Rahman, regional representative – South Asia

Latest ILRI announcements -

Hello everyone

I’m really pleased to inform you that Dr. Habibar Rahmanwill join ILRI as regional representative for South Asia beginning 1 April 2017. Dr Rahman is currently Deputy Director General (Animal Sciences), Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), New Delhi. He has a B.V.Sc. & AH from Assam Agricultural University, M.V.Sc. from Punjab Agricultural University and PhD in Microbiology and Public Health from GB Pant University of Agriculture and Technology. He pursued his Post-Doctoral training at the Robert Koch Institute, Germany and University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA. Dr Rahman’s career includes senior roles in the ICAR-National Institute of Veterinary Epidemiology & Disease Informatics (NIVEDI), the ICAR Research Complex for NEH Region, Gangtok and Shillong and he was Head of the Division, Veterinary Public Health, h-rahmanIndian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly. Dr H. Rahman has over 30 years global research experience covering many aspects of veterinary science, especially the role of animal health for improved productivity. He has a substantial publication record, has supervised many students and received a number of national awards.

We look forward to welcoming Dr Rahman to ILRI. Please also join me in thanking Padma for acting in this role in the meantime.

 

Shirley Tarawali | Assistant Director General

 

Novel tools to inform animal breeding programs

CRP 3.7 News -

In late 2016, the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish produced several synthesis products, including a series of briefs on livestock genetics work carried out between 2012 and 2016.

The design of a livestock breeding program largely depends on adequate infrastructure—ranging from efficient collection of phenotypes, development of models, data analysis, program implementation to buy-in from the public and farmers. This key infrastructure is usually lacking in developing countries.

Using novel tools that circumvent these constraints offers many opportunities to developing countries. However, this requires a range of scientific expertise not readily available, underlining the importance of collaboration between advanced universities and research institutes.

This brief outlines how a circle of innovation approach can be used to put these novel tools into use in developing countries.

Download the brief:

Mrode, R., Han Jianlin, Mwacharo, J. and Koning, D. Jan de. 2016. Novel tools to inform animal breeding programs. Livestock and Fish Brief 14. Nairobi: ILRI.

 


Filed under: Animal Breeding, Genetics, ICARDA, ILRI, LiveGene, Livestock, LIVESTOCK-FISH, Research, Value Chains

ILRI Corporate report 2015–2016 is now available: capitalizing on the livestock revolution

Spotlight from ILRI news -

 Cover

ILRI Corporate Report 2015-2016

The Board of Trustees, management and staff of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) take great pleasure in announcing the publication of the ILRI Corporate report 2015–2016.

With a brief introduction by Jimmy Smith, the director general of ILRI, and Lindsay Falvey, chair of the ILRI Board of Trustees, the report concisely outlines the many opportunities and challenges facing the livestock sector. The two ILRI leaders underline the importance that the world seek to capitalize on these transformational opportunities by paying greater attention to livestock, recognizing its potential for harm as well as good, and making commensurate investments in livestock research and development work.

The chapter on ‘Influencing global agendas’ defines specifically what getting the world to pay greater attention to livestock would mean in concrete terms: raising the prominence of livestock in the global development agenda; recognizing the role of the smallholder livestock sector for sustainable food and nutritional security and poverty reduction; and pursuing interventions to make livestock systems more environmentally sustainable.

In line with the ILRI strategy 2013–2022, the report provides examples of specific results of ILRI’s work in partnership with a broad range of stakeholders putting science into practice, facilitating evidence-based decision-making and developing the capacities of its partners in five interlinked areas: livestock genetics and breeding; livestock feeds and forages; livestock and human health; policies, value chains and livelihoods; and sustainable livestock systems. These include better smallholder livestock production systems; improved human nutrition and health; more quality food; higher household incomes; climate-smart livestock; fewer human and livestock diseases; environmental protection; gender equity and inclusive growth; and enabling policies and institutions.

Over the course of the next month, each chapter—genetics, feeds and forages, health, livelihoods and the environment—of the report will be published on the ILRI News blog, with links to articles for the reader to dig further into each specific issue. So, delve into the full report now or wait to read the individual chapters in the coming weeks.

ILRI acknowledges all of those who have partnered in its work, invested in its projects, used its research and publicized its findings. None of our achievements would be possible without this broader community of gifted and dedicated livestock-for-development workers. The collective achievements outlined in this report are a testimony to all those who have invested their resources in helping capitalize from the ‘livestock revolution’, ensuring sustainable livestock development can do much more than produce more food, it can nourish the world’s populations and drive equitable and broad-based economic growth.

Read online or download the full ILRI Corporate report 2015–2016


ILRI Corporate report 2015–2016 is now available: capitalizing on the livestock revolution

News from ILRI -

 Cover

ILRI Corporate Report 2015-2016

The Board of Trustees, management and staff of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) take great pleasure in announcing the publication of the ILRI Corporate report 2015–2016.

With a brief introduction by Jimmy Smith, the director general of ILRI, and Lindsay Falvey, chair of the ILRI Board of Trustees, the report concisely outlines the many opportunities and challenges facing the livestock sector. The two ILRI leaders underline the importance that the world seek to capitalize on these transformational opportunities by paying greater attention to livestock, recognizing its potential for harm as well as good, and making commensurate investments in livestock research and development work.

The chapter on ‘Influencing global agendas’ defines specifically what getting the world to pay greater attention to livestock would mean in concrete terms: raising the prominence of livestock in the global development agenda; recognizing the role of the smallholder livestock sector for sustainable food and nutritional security and poverty reduction; and pursuing interventions to make livestock systems more environmentally sustainable.

In line with the ILRI strategy 2013–2022, the report provides examples of specific results of ILRI’s work in partnership with a broad range of stakeholders putting science into practice, facilitating evidence-based decision-making and developing the capacities of its partners in five interlinked areas: livestock genetics and breeding; livestock feeds and forages; livestock and human health; policies, value chains and livelihoods; and sustainable livestock systems. These include better smallholder livestock production systems; improved human nutrition and health; more quality food; higher household incomes; climate-smart livestock; fewer human and livestock diseases; environmental protection; gender equity and inclusive growth; and enabling policies and institutions.

Over the course of the next month, each chapter—genetics, feeds and forages, health, livelihoods and the environment—of the report will be published on the ILRI News blog, with links to articles for the reader to dig further into each specific issue. So, delve into the full report now or wait to read the individual chapters in the coming weeks.

ILRI acknowledges all of those who have partnered in its work, invested in its projects, used its research and publicized its findings. None of our achievements would be possible without this broader community of gifted and dedicated livestock-for-development workers. The collective achievements outlined in this report are a testimony to all those who have invested their resources in helping capitalize from the ‘livestock revolution’, ensuring sustainable livestock development can do much more than produce more food, it can nourish the world’s populations and drive equitable and broad-based economic growth.

Read online or download the full ILRI Corporate report 2015–2016


Is production intensification likely to make farm households food-adequate? A simple food availability analysis across smallholder farming systems from East and West Africa

Our latest outputs -

Is production intensification likely to make farm households food-adequate? A simple food availability analysis across smallholder farming systems from East and West Africa Ritzema, R.S.; Frelat, R.; Douxchamps, S.; Silvestri, S.; Rufino, M.C.; Herrero, M.; Giller, K.E.; López-Ridaura, S.; Teufel, N.; Paul, Birthe; Van Wijk, M.T. Despite considerable development investment, food insecurity remains prevalent throughout East and West Africa. The concept of ‘sustainable intensification’ of agricultural production has been promoted as a means to meet growing food needs in these regions. However, inadequate attention has been given to assessing whether benefits from intensification would be realized by farm households considering highly diverse resource endowments, household and farm characteristics, and agroecological contexts. In this study, we apply a simple energy-based index of food availability to 1800 households from research sites in 7 countries in East and West Africa to assess the food availability status of each of these households and to quantify the contribution of different on- and off-farm activities to food availability. We estimate the effects of two production intensification strategies on food availability: increased cereal crop production from crop-based options, and increased production of key livestock products from livestock-based options. These two options are contrasted with a third strategy: increased off-farm income for each household from broader socioeconomic-based options. Using sensitivity analysis, each strategy is tested against baseline values via incremental production increases. Baseline results exhibit considerable diversity within and across sites in household food availability status and livelihood strategies. Interventions represented in the crop and livestock options may primarily benefit food-adequate and marginally food-inadequate households, and have little impact on the most food-inadequate households. The analysis questions what production intensification can realistically achieve for East and West African smallholders, and how intensification strategies must be augmented with transformational strategies to reach the poorest households. Springer Nature has provided an Open Access version of this article via following link: http://rdcu.be/oRfg

The fourth Annual Bank Conference on Africa: Call for papers

CRP 2: program news -

The fourth Annual Bank Conference on Africa (ABCA) will be held at Berkeley, California, on June 5-6, 2017. Titled The Challenges and Opportunities of Transforming African Agriculture, the conference will cover various topics pertinent to agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa. It is being organized jointly by the World Bank (Office of the Chief Economist for the Africa Region), the >> Read more

Study finds that some tropical grasses provide nutritious animal feed and improved nitrogen use efficiency

CRP 7 News -

Emissions of nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse gas, have been increasing since industrialization. Livestock excreta accounts for 10% of nitrous oxide emissions from soils, largely through bovine urine because its high nitrogen concentration generally exceeds plant uptake rates. Soil Biology and Biochemistry

In multi-year trials, scientists observed that exudates from the roots of some plants inhibit the activity of soil nitrifiers (a process known as biological nitrification inhibition - BNI). Therefore, these plants slow down soil nitrogen transformation processes - increasing fertility and reducing emissions of nitrous oxide. But would BNI work on these concentrated urine patches?

In a 2017 publication in Soil Biology & Biochemistryresearchers shared results from a short-term experiment to determine the initial responses of soil nitrifiers to bovine urine patches and their respective feedbacks on soil nitrous oxide emission under two different Brachiaria cultivars that have been shown to have high BNI capacity. They found that  tropical forages with high BNI capacity indeed mitigatied nitrous oxide emissions from bovine urine patches in pasture soils. 

Results point to the potential ofwide-spread adoption of tropical forage grasses with high BNI capacity  to decrease nitrous oxide emissions in grazed pastures. Countries with large numbers of livestock may want to consider expansion of forage grasses with high BNI as a mitigation option that is compatible with increased productivity.

The International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) conducted the research as part of the CCAFS LivestockPlus project, and in collaboration with efforts funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the University of California Davis Research for Innovation Fellowship in Agriculture, and the University of Hohenheim. CCAFS receives support from CGIAR Fund Donors and through bilateral funding agreements.

Citation: Byrnes RC, Nùñez J, Arenas L, Rao I, Trujillo C, Alvarez C, Arango J, Rasche F, Chirinda N. 2017. Biological nitrification inhibition by Brachiaria grasses mitigates soil nitrous oxide emissions from bovine urine patches. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 107: 156-163.

Read the original blog on CIAT News written by Ngonidzashe Chirinda: Tropical grasses: feed and plumber

Collecting farmers’ feedback on climate information services in Rwanda

CRP 7 News -

The impacts of climate variability are increasingly visible in Rwanda, especially in the agricultural sector. Yet farmers often point to the lack of access to the relevant information related to climate variability as the reason they cannot manage risks for better agricultural production.

Through a live broadcast on Huguka Radio —a local extension radio station that covers 70% of Rwanda—Twahirwa Anthony, a senior weather forecaster from the Rwanda Meteorological Agency (Meteo Rwanda), highlighted the type of climate services information available to farmers and discussed how this information is disseminated and used. Farmers then directly provided feedback by calling during the show, sending text messages, and commenting on social media. During the broadcast, Anthony explained what the weather forecast is and what people should have in mind once they receive it: “The forecast is a prediction; therefore it should not be surprising once it changes.”

Getting the relevant, up-to-date information to farmers

Except God, no one else can predict the weather,” said some of the farmers who called in during the show.

The views received from listeners, especially farmers, show that seasonal forecast information often do not match the realities on ground. Farmers expressed frustration and lack of trust in the weather forecast information from Rwanda Meteorological Agency. In an interview with Huguka Radio, Mukamana Francine, a farmer from the Muhanga district commented: “Meteo Rwanda says that the seasonal amount of rainfall is enough to grow beans, but it does not.” “Meteo specialists should consider checking their machines because they give mismatching information, so that farmers could fully benefit from climate services information,” added another farmer from Muhanga district, Nsengiyumva Epa.

Speaking on the availability and accuracy of climate services and information, Anthony explained how data from different Meteo Rwanda weather stations are gathered and compiled for publication. He pointed out that the misunderstanding stems from farmers not being updated about the changes that occur along the season. “As we give the seasonal forecast, there are possibilities to access to short term forecast (3days, 10days forecast, etc.) which helps farmers to cope with seasonal weather variabilities,” Anthony noted.

Anthony also acknowledged that the current large scale of weather forecast information provided to farmers (province level) is not fine enough to use in daily decision-making. He advised farmers to request for more detailed weather information available with agriculture extension services and agencies such as the Rwanda Agriculture Board (RAB) and other appropriate agronomic advisory services in order to bridge the gap between forecast dissemination and use. Regarding the issue of meteorologists using weather forecast terminologies unfamiliar or unknown to farmers, Anthony commented that Meteo Rwanda has the responsibility to approach and explain to stakeholders or users of the information the meaning of different terminologies so that the disseminated climate and weather information is more accessible and better understood.  

Efforts to increase capacity to deliver climate information at local level

Feedback from radio listeners from different districts such as Gicumbi, Gakenke, and Burera emphasized the need for better means of dissemination for climate-informed agricultural advisories, such as through text messages. Anthony stated that, in collaboration with RAB and the local government, the existing home-grown decentralized, farmer oriented national agricultural extension and advisory services delivery model locally known as “Twigire Muhinzi” can be used to empower agronomists to disseminate climate information to farmers efficiently.

Joint efforts and strategies are being used to ensure that climate services information is downscaled and relevant to smallholder farmers in Rwanda. Through the Rwanda Climate Services for Agriculture project funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and implemented by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Meteo Rwanda is increasing its capacity to provide climate information services as well as develop tools tailored to farmers’ needs. Anthony highlighted few concrete examples including the downscaled, gridded historical climatic data and downscaled climatology forecast available online in the Meteo Rwanda Maproom developed by the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI). Through the collaboration between Meteo Rwanda, RAB, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), and CCAFS, there is hope that farmers will have access to climate services information for better decision-making to cope with climate variability and to wave away smallholder farmers' myths on climate and weather forecast. 

Further readings

ILRI-DAAD PhD Scholarship Sustainable Livestock Systems (Closing date: 31 January 2017)

Jobs -

The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) seeks to recruit a Graduate Fellow to assist in analyzing existing field survey data on ruminant diet, production and condition, (available within Mazingira Centre) in order to compare ruminant greenhouse gas emissions from different areas of Kenya and develop a detailed uncertainty analysis of these factors.

ILRI works to improve food and nutritional security and reduce poverty in developing countries through research for efficient, safe and sustainable use of livestock. It is the only one of 15 CGIAR research centres dedicated entirely to animal agriculture research for the developing world. Co-hosted by Kenya and Ethiopia, it has regional or country offices and projects in East, South and Southeast Asia as well as Central, East, Southern and West Africa. www.ilri.org

DAAD is a German Academic Exchange service which is a publicly funded, self-governing organization of the institutions of higher education in Germany. DAAD promotes international academic exchange as well as educational co-operation with developing countries through a variety of funding and scholarship programs.

ILRI Research Project: Estimation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors (EF) from ruminants in Kenya/Tanzania.

Graduate fellowship project title: Comparative analysis of ruminant GHG emission factors and GHG emissions intensities from different smallholder systems in Kenya and Tanzania.

Background:

In the East Africa region there is no comprehensive baseline data for greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions from agricultural systems, particularly livestock systems. The main reasons for data scarcity are lack of analytical facilities and human capacity to conduct measurements complying with international standards. The lack of data on emissions for agricultural systems has led to poor evaluations of mitigation options, mostly based on emission factors from the developed world and biogeochemical models calibrated elsewhere. Because most sub-Saharan African countries have agricultural dependent economies (estimates above 30% GDP), development plans must consider the environmental impact of different intensification pathways – in terms of GHG emissions but also with regard to water supply and water quality or biodiversity – that are designed to achieve food security in the region.

The proposed Ph.D. research aims at analyzing existing field survey data on ruminant diet, production and condition, (available within Mazingira Centre) in order to compare ruminant greenhouse gas emissions from different areas of Kenya and develop a detailed uncertainty analysis of these factors. The novel contribution of this PhD research is twofold: (1) deriving spatially explicit GHG emissions data from ruminants in Kenya and (2) an uncertainty analysis of the most recently collected data.

Key responsibilities:

  • Integrative analysis of data
  • Production of scientific papers

Requirements:

  • MSc in animal production science
  • Strong mathematical and statistical knowledge
  • Familiarity with “R” is an asset
  • A background in the measurement of ruminant enteric emissions is essential
  • Good writing skills demonstrated through research reports and journal publications
  • An effective and energetic team player with the ability to work in a multidisciplinary and multi-cultural environment
  • Excellent oral communication and writing skills in English. Knowledge of Swahili will be an added advantage
  • Ability to work independently, multi-task and meet tight deadlines

Terms of appointment: ILRI will offer a competitive stipend to cover living expenses in the project location(s). The successful candidate will be supervised jointly by an ILRI scientist and the university/academic supervisor.

Location:                     Kenya & Tanzania
Duration:                     3 years

Application requirements:

  • The last university degree must have been completed less than six years ago at the time of application
  • Applicants should be citizens of a country in Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Must be a holder of a Master’s degree qualification with at least above average results

How to apply:

Interested applicants should submit the following documents:

  • A cover letter explaining your interest in the scholarship position, what you can bring to ILRI. The graduate fellowship project title and reference number: DAAD/SLS/ 08/2017 should be clearly indicated in the subject line of the cover letter
  • Names and addresses (including telephone and email) of three referees who are knowledgeable about your professional qualifications and work experience
  • Signed curriculum vitae scanned in PDF; please use the Europass CV template available on (http://europass.cedefop.europa.eu)
  • Certified scanned copies of all university degree certificates
  • Certified scanned PDF copies of all university transcripts
  • A temporary admission letter including fee structure of respective course or an official letter assuring admission (scanned PDF copy). This will be provided to you in soft by your institution upon shortlisting. If this is not available by the closing date for application; please include with the application a commitment letter that you will have obtained this by 1st September 2017 as this is a mandatory requirement before commencing the fellowship program
  • PhD research proposal including a detailed work plan (10 to 15 pages); plagiarism tests will be checked! The proposal has to be in line with the above outlined ILRI’s research project
  • Abstract of the proposal on one page (please include name and title of proposal)
  • Where applicable a recommendation letter by the head of department indicating that you are a present or prospective member of staff and how you will be integrated into the staff development agenda of the university (original only)
  • Confirmation of study leave from your university (if applicable; scanned PDF copy)
  • Confirmation of teaching release (university staff members only; scanned PDF copy)

All applications to be submitted online through our recruitment portal http://ilri.simplicant.com/ on or before 31 January 2017.

We thank all applicants for their interest in ILRI. Due to the volume of applications, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

ILRI does not charge a fee at any stage of the recruitment process (application, interview meeting, processing or training). ILRI also does not concern itself with information on applicants’ bank accounts.

To find out more about ILRI visit our websites at http://www.ilri.org

To find out more about working at ILRI visit our website at http://www.ilri.org/ilricrowd/

Suitably qualified women and citizens of Sub-Saharan African countries, with experience of working internationally, are particularly encouraged to apply.


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