CGIAR research program on dryland systems

CGIAR Research Program on Dryland SystemsThe CGIAR Research Program CRP1.1 Dryland Systems ("Integrated agricultural production systems for the poor and vulnerable in dry areas") is designed to pursue new knowledge about dryland agro-ecosystems of the developing world and to develop technologies and policies that will improve the livelihoods of poor agricultural communities in target regions of those. Key constraints to be overcome characterize dryland agricultural environments: water scarcity, frequent droughts, high climatic variability, poor soil resources, and land degradation, with all of these likely to be affected by climate change.

The overall goal is to identify and develop resilient diversified and more productive combinations of mixed crop/livestock, rangeland, aquatic and agroforestry systems that have the potential to be scaled-up, especially in dry areas where water is scarce.

CGIAR Research Program 1.1 targets the poor and highly vulnerable populations of the dry areas. It aims to develop technology, policy and institutional innovations to improve livelihoods, using an integrated agro-ecosystems approach to research -for- development. It is currently under consideration for funding by the CGIAR Consortium of Board and the CGIAR Fund Council.

Data from the first round of a household survey evaluating the impact of the Index-Based Livestock Insurance (IBLI) in Marsabit, Kenya is now available. Continue reading

IBLI, Jun/2015

Data from household surveys conducted by the Index Based Livestock Insurance (IBLI) project in the Borena Zone of Ethiopia is now available online. Continue reading

IBLI, Jun/2015

Recently, there has been much excitement around the use of index-based insurance as an alternative to conventional insurance products that may extend the rural poor’s access to formal insurance coverage in developing countries. Continue reading

IBLI, Feb/2015

Eurisy, the European Union funded non-profit, which seeks to raise awareness of emerging satellite applications, has just published an article highlighting Index-Based Livestock Insurance in Kenya and Ethiopia. Continue reading

IBLI, Jun/2015

Migrant pastoralists on the arid and semi-arid lands (ASAL) of East Africa are among the poorest and most vulnerable people on earth. Most of their economic activity is based around livestock herding and management. Continue reading

IBLI, Feb/2015

A new research brief by ILRI demonstrates that index insurance shows considerable promise, especially in settings where conventional insurance to cover potentially catastrophic herd losses does not exist. Continue reading

IBLI, Jun/2015

Uninsured risk exposure and the experience of uninsured shocks in low-income rural communities cause serious welfare losses and distort behaviors, potentially even resulting in poverty traps. However, conventional insurance products are routinely unavailable due to moral hazard and adverse selection problems, as well as high transaction costs in infrastructure-poor areas. Continue reading

IBLI, Feb/2015

A new research brief by ILRI shares lessons in extension and outreach from the Index-Based Livestock Insurance (IBLI) project in Wajir, Kenya. Continue reading

IBLI, Mar/2015

An Australian Aid-funded project seeks to generate a number of policy-relevant results on the feedbacks between migrant pastoralism and the environment, including addressing the impacts of new index insurance products. Continue reading

IBLI, Mar/2015

In an article published on 2 March 2015 in Reactions magazine online, Victoria Beckett reports that '[r]ecent technology has allowed satellite imagery to assess weather damage' and [o]ver the last few years "index-based livestock insurance (IBLI)" has provided insured pastoralists across Africa with a pay-out in times of drought, based on predicted rather than actual livestock deaths.' Continue reading

IBLI, Mar/2015

Pages

Amare Haileslassie
Post Doctoral Scientist
Andrew Mude
Principal Economist
Augustine A. Ayantunde
Senior Animal Scientist
Beth Njoroge
Administrative Assistant
Brenda Wandera Gache
Market and Capacity Development Manager

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Contact:
Polly Ericksen

ILRI people working on this research program

Amare Haileslassie
Post Doctoral Scientist
Andrew Mude
Principal Economist
Augustine A. Ayantunde
Senior Animal Scientist
Beth Njoroge
Administrative Assistant
Brenda Wandera Gache
Market and Capacity Development Manager
Enoch Mobisa Ontiri
Research Technician II
Fiona Flintan
Rangelands Governance Scientist and Technical Coordinator for International Land Coalition's Rangelands Initiative
Iddo Dror
Head of Capacity Development

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Subject categories:
drylands