CGIAR research program on dryland systems

CGIAR Research Program on Dryland SystemsThe CGIAR Research Program CRP1.1 Dryland Systems ("Integrated agricultural production systems for the poor and vulnerable in dry areas") is designed to pursue new knowledge about dryland agro-ecosystems of the developing world and to develop technologies and policies that will improve the livelihoods of poor agricultural communities in target regions of those. Key constraints to be overcome characterize dryland agricultural environments: water scarcity, frequent droughts, high climatic variability, poor soil resources, and land degradation, with all of these likely to be affected by climate change.

The overall goal is to identify and develop resilient diversified and more productive combinations of mixed crop/livestock, rangeland, aquatic and agroforestry systems that have the potential to be scaled-up, especially in dry areas where water is scarce.

CGIAR Research Program 1.1 targets the poor and highly vulnerable populations of the dry areas. It aims to develop technology, policy and institutional innovations to improve livelihoods, using an integrated agro-ecosystems approach to research -for- development. It is currently under consideration for funding by the CGIAR Consortium of Board and the CGIAR Fund Council.

At this week’s international conference on Integrated Systems Research for Sustainable Intensification in Smallholder Agriculture, Aston Mulwafu presented a poster explaining on different feed options for smallholder dairy farmers to intensify their production systems in Malawi.     Dairying in smallholder farming systems can be intensified to improve livelihoods. The biggest constraint faced by resource-constrained … Continue reading

Africa RISING, Mar/2015

New developments in technology bring areas of insurance that were previously not cost-effective into financial viability. In an article published on 2 March 2015 in Reactions magazine online, Victoria Beckett reports that ‘[r]ecent technology has allowed satellite imagery to assess weather damage’ and [o]ver the last few years “index-based livestock insurance (IBLI)” has provided insured pastoralists across Africa with … Continue reading

IBLI, Mar/2015

At this week's international conference on Integrated Systems Research for Sustainable Intensification in Smallholder Agriculture, Chiwimbo Gwenambira (Michigan State University) presented a poster explaining a a novel doubled-up legume cropping system in Malawi. Continue reading

Africa RISING, Mar/2015

Uninsured risk exposure and the experience of uninsured shocks in low-income rural communities cause serious welfare losses and distort behaviors, potentially even resulting in poverty traps. However, conventional insurance products are routinely unavailable due to moral hazard and adverse selection problems, as well as high transaction costs in infrastructure-poor areas. Continue reading

IBLI, Feb/2015

Migrant pastoralists on the arid and semi-arid lands (ASAL) of East Africa are among the poorest and most vulnerable people on earth. Most of their economic activity is based around livestock herding and management. Continue reading

IBLI, Feb/2015

Recently, there has been much excitement around the use of index-based insurance as an alternative to conventional insurance products that may extend the rural poor’s access to formal insurance coverage in developing countries. Continue reading

IBLI, Feb/2015

IBLI featured as part of the KRDP end of the year newsletter Continue reading

IBLI, Jan/2015

By Fabian Mangera WAJIR (Xinhua)  Some 101 Muslim pastoralists on Tuesday received 5,800 U.S. dollar compensation for drought- induced losses suffered in Wajir County of northern Kenya. The pastoralists’ herds of sheep, goat, cattle and camels were insured in August 2013 by Takaful Insurance of Africa (TIA) with an Index-Based Livestock Insurance (IBLI) product, branded … Continue reading

IBLI, Sep/2014

Fertilizer microdosing addresses the problems of low soil fertility, access to fertilizers and difficult climatic conditions. The technology has contributed to increased production, productivity and farm incomes. Continue reading

Africa RISING, Jan/2015

On a hot morning in Nairobi in 2014, Andrew Mude, Team Leader for the Index-Based Livestock Insurance program (IBLI hereafter), looked out of his office window at cows grazing on Ngong Hills’ green pastures, but his mind was elsewhere. Continue reading

IBLI, Jan/2015

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Amare Haileslassie
Post Doctoral Scientist
Andrew Mude
Principal Economist
Augustine A. Ayantunde
Senior Animal Scientist
Beth Njoroge
Administrative Assistant
Brenda Wandera Gache
Market and Capacity Development Manager

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Contact:
Polly Ericksen

Photos

ILRI people working on this research program

Amare Haileslassie
Post Doctoral Scientist
Andrew Mude
Principal Economist
Augustine A. Ayantunde
Senior Animal Scientist
Beth Njoroge
Administrative Assistant
Brenda Wandera Gache
Market and Capacity Development Manager
Enoch Mobisa Ontiri
Research Technician II
Fiona Flintan
Rangelands Governance Scientist and Technical Coordinator for International Land Coalition's Rangelands Initiative
Iddo Dror
Head of Capacity Development

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Subject categories:
drylands