Maurice Karani

Maurice Karani

Maurice Karani is a veterinary epidemiologist working at the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Kenya. Maurice has been involved in research projects aimed at understanding the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases at the human-animal-environmental interface across scales. Some of the projects he has worked in include: a multi-institutional collaborative project that sought

Maurice Karani is a veterinary epidemiologist working at the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Kenya. Maurice has been involved in research projects aimed at understanding the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases at the human-animal-environmental interface across scales. Some of the projects he has worked in include: a multi-institutional collaborative project that sought to understand the mechanisms leading to the introduction of pathogens into urban populations through livestock commodity value chains; ZooLinK project that aimed at strengthening surveillance systems of selected zoonotic diseases and a Fleming Fund project that aims to capacity build government to undertake an AMR surveillance.  

The fellowship research topic is on quantifying the cost-effectiveness of Rabies control in Machakos County. Rabies is a fatal viral zoonosis that is predominantly transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected dog, has been recognized as a threat to humans since 2000BC. Whilst the disease – canine rabies - has been eliminated in developed countries, rabies is endemic and continues to ravage most of Africa and parts of Asia. It is estimated that 59,000 people die annually from the infection. The disease neglect is majorly due to its association with the poor and marginalized in the society, poor surveillance systems, lack of diagnostic capacity, and weak collaboration between veterinary and human health care systems. The study will seek to understand the historic health and economic burden in humans, use ecological methods to understand coverage of dog population during vaccination campaigns whilst using economic approaches to understand the cost-effectiveness of control programs. Maurice plans to test appropriate cost-sharing models for sustainable control and surveillance within the county and understand whether human health stakeholders feel engaged with such a program and their perception of benefit to the health of the population. The fellowship will run for three years from August 2021.

The fellowship is hosted by the One Health Research, Education and Outreach Center in Africa (OHRECA) led by ILRI. The fellowship will be supervised by Eric Fèvre (Professor of Veterinary Infectious Diseases, Institute of Infection and Global Health, at the University of Liverpool) and jointly appointed Lian Thomas (Principal scientist at ILRI and a veterinary public health lecturer at the University of Liverpool) and Dishon Muloi (postdoctoral fellow - Epidemiology/Antimicrobial Resistance at ILRI).