Amare Haileslassie

Personal Information
Staff picture Full name Amare Haileslassie
Position Post Doctoral Scientist
Email a.haileslassie@cgiar.org
Telephone -30713604
Profile

Amare is a Postdoctoral Scientist in Natural Resource Management. He trained at Alemaya University of Agriculture in plant science (Ethiopia); and subsequently went on to attain an MSc in tropical and subtropical forestry and natural resources management and a PhD in nutrient cycling and soil fertility management both from George August University (Germany). He has extensive experience in development-research in various public and private organizations in Ethiopia and Germany. Amare has published widely in international journals on assessing livestock water and nutrient productivity in different production systems. He aims to advance the scientific understanding of the varied and complex ways in which livestock, water and nutrient resources interact. Prior to his new appointment, Amare was a Research Officer in ILRI, Addis Ababa, a role he took up in July 2007. He has been working on water and livestock issues in Sub Saharan Africa. This included developing and testing methodologies, advancing understanding of varied and complex ways in which livestock, water and nutrient resources interact. He is also coordinated the institutional and policy component of the upstream - down stream project. His priority research area includes system analysis by bringing environmental sustainability dimensions into livestock development.  Selected publications 1)      Haileslassie, A., Priess, J., Veldkamp, E., Teketay, D. and Lesschen, J.P., 2005. Assessment of soil nutrient depletion and its spatial variability on smallholders’ mixed farming systems in Ethiopia using partial versus full nutrient balances. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment. 108 (1), 1-16.   2)      Haileslassie, A., Priess, J., Veldkamp, E., and Lesschen, J.P., 2006. Smallholders’ soil fertility management in the Central Highlands of Ethiopia: implications for nutrient stocks, balances and sustainability of agroecosystems. Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems 75:135-146   3)       Haileslassie, A., Priess, J., Veldkamp, E., and Lesschen, J.P., 2007. Nutrient flows and balances at the field and farm scale: exploring effects of land-use strategies and access to resources. Agricultural System 94: 459-470.   4)      Gebreselassie, S., Peden, D., Haileslassie, A. 2009. The Factors affecting livestock water productivity: animal scale analysis using previous cattle feeding trials in Ethiopia. Range land Journal 31: 251-258   5)      Haileslassie, A., Peden, D., Gebreselassie, S., Amede, T., Descheemaeker, D.,. 2009 Livestock water productivity in mixed crop–livestock farming systems of the Blue Nile basin: Assessing variability and prospects for improvement. Agricultural system Volume 102, Issues 1-3, October 2009, Pages 33-40   6)      Haileslassie, A., Peden, D., Gebreselassie, S., Amede, T., Wagnew, A.Taddesse, G., 2009. Livestock water productivity in the Blue Nile Basin: assessment of farm scale heterogeneity. The Range land Journal 31: 213-222     7)      Peden, D., Tadesse, G., Haileslassie, A.,. 2009. Livestock water productivity: implications for sub-Saharan Africa. The Range land Journal 31:   8)      Katrien Descheemaeker, Tilahun Amede, Haileslassie, A. 2009. Improving water productivity in mixed crop–livestock farming systems of sub-Saharan Africa. Agricultural Water Management 97: 579–586.

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