pastoralism

This page brings together ILRI and partner resources on pastoralism. Click different tabs to see news items, research outputs, journal articles, video materials and presentations as well as ILRI projects and people related to pastoralism. See ILRI research on other subjects

The Athi-Kaputiei ecosystem covers about 2,200 square kilometres of Kenya’s Kajiado County, south of Nairobi. It is also home to Nairobi National Park—the world’s only game reserve within a major city. The ecosystem has experienced some dramatic changes since the late 19th century. The accounts of early writers paint a picture of a spectacular ecosystem teeming with diverse resident and migratory wildlife. Records describe abundant wildebeest that migrated seasonally with other wildlife species, livestock and pastoralists. In a recently published study my colleagues and I examined the impact of land fragmentation in the Athi-Kaputiei ecosystem between 1977 and 2014. Our study shows that urbanisation and development has put the ecosystem in distress. It has fragmented the landscape which has reduced the ability of animals to migrate as they used to. The result is that their numbers have plummeted. Continue reading →
ILRI clippings, Nov/2016
Under the livestock component of the Feed the Future Kenya Accelerated Value Chain Development (AVCD) program, ILRI is implementing a three – tier train – a – trainer model to train veterinarians and community disease reporters on the symptoms of prevalent livestock diseases. Continue reading →
Livestock system and environment , Nov/2016
A new paper on the consequences of land fragmentation and fencing on rangelands outside Nairobi, Kenya, formerly rich with wildlife and critical for the functioning of Nairobi's famed national park, has been published. All of the authors are former staff, and one former partner, of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), where this research work was conducted. Continue reading →
ILRI news blog, Nov/2016
Food security and resilience-building have become central in the international development community’s efforts to help developing countries and vulnerable populations manage climate change. Continue reading →
IBLI, Nov/2016
Insurance that pays out when forage coverage drops—known as index-based livestock insurance—is an elegant idea. Andrew Mude, an economist and principal scientist at ILRI, last month was awarded the Norman Borlaug Award for Field Research and Application. The award, a major prize in agricultural research, is given by the World Food Prize Foundation and financed by the Rockefeller Foundation. Tina Rosenberg covers the story in the New York Times. Continue reading →
ILRI news blog, Nov/2016
Developed in partnership with International Livestock Research Institute, Cornell University and University of California Davis, IBLI uses data gathered by satellite to create a vegetation index that can be used to track the density of vegetation available to pastoralists. Continue reading →
IBLI, Nov/2016
Andrew Mude, a Kenyan economist, has a way of explaining satellites. When he’s talking to pastoral in his country’s north — people who roam the earth with a dozen head of cattle and very little else — he talks about the stars that don’t act like other stars. “They’re actually taking pictures of the ground,” Mude says. Herders, a stargazing people, understand. Continue reading →
IBLI, Nov/2016
On 13 October 2016, the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and the National Land Commission (NLC) in Kenya signed an agreement to initiate collaboration between the two institutions on land use planning and rangeland management. Continue reading →
ILRI clippings, Oct/2016
BETTER SCIENCE, BETTER LIVES The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), headquartered in Africa and working in poor countries worldwide to provide better lives through livestock, held its Institute Planning Meeting from 4 to 7 Oct 2016. This is the sixth of a series of blog articles reporting on plans for ILRI research programs, including ILRI’s work in … Continue reading →
ILRI news blog, Oct/2016
Pastoral populations of Sub-Saharan Africa are particularly vulnerable to environmental shocks, which contribute to livestock mortality and therefore losses in both wealth and productive assets. Although conventional insurance mechanisms covering individual losses are generally not cost effective  (page 2) in low-income pastoral communities that engage in extensive grazing, index insurance for livestock offers a promising … Continue reading →
IBLI, Oct/2016

Pages

Birhanu Taddesse Ayana
Research Officer
Lance W. Robinson
Senior Scientist
Munenobu Ikegami
Economist
Racheal Mwaura
Project Management Specialist
Todd Andrew Crane
Climate Adaptation Scientist

Video

People working on pastoralism

Birhanu Taddesse Ayana
Research Officer
Lance W. Robinson
Senior Scientist
Munenobu Ikegami
Economist
Racheal Mwaura
Project Management Specialist
Todd Andrew Crane
Climate Adaptation Scientist